22 December 2006
General Assembly
GA/10566

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-first General Assembly

Plenary

84th Meeting (PM & Night)


GENERAL ASSEMBLY ADOPTS ASSESSMENT SCALES FOR REGULAR, PEACEKEEPING BUDGETS,


CAPITAL MASTER PLAN, AS IT CONCLUDES MAIN PART OF SIXTY-FIRSt SESSION


President Cites Many Successes, Including Strengthened ECOSOC,

Says Much Can Be Achieved When States Unite in Partnership, Overcome Mistrust


Wrapping up the main part of its sixty-first session this evening, the General Assembly approved the scale of assessments for the regular and peacekeeping budgets of the United Nations and paved the way for a $1.9 billion renovation to begin on the world body’s landmark Headquarters building.


Reiterating its “serious concern at the hazards, risks and deficiencies of the current conditions of the building… which endanger the safety, health and well-being of staff, delegations, visitors and tourists”, the Assembly, acting on the recommendations of its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary), adopted the Capital Master Plan for refurbishing the 54-year-old building, to be completed by 2014 at a cost of $1.88 billion dollars, with a working capital of $45 million, including requirements for a temporary space to house staff.


In her closing statement, Assembly President Sheikha Haya Rashed Al Khalifa (Bahrain) said that, during the main part of the session, she had worked with Member States and outgoing Secretary-General Kofi Annan to build bridges and trust and that she intended to continue to do so when Secretary-General-designate Ban Ki-moon took office in the new year.


“You have shown that, when we are united in partnership and overcome mistrust, we can achieve much more for each other,” she said, noting that the adoption of a long-awaited resolution on strengthening the Economic and Social Council was a good example of that.  She also pointed out other successes, including the Assembly’s adoption of two important international Conventions, respectively to protect and promote the rights and dignity of persons with disabilities, and to protect all persons from enforced disappearance. 


She also highlighted the informal thematic debate on development as an example of the increasing visibility of the Assembly, and expressed the hope that consensus would be reached on a comprehensive convention on international terrorism.  She previewed the two debates she planned to convene, the first this coming March on gender equality and the empowerment of women and then, in the summer of 2007, on dialogue and tolerance among civilizations and cultures.  She expressed the hope that “we can begin the new year by working even more closely together in the spirit of cooperation, mutual trust and collective responsibility”.


Earlier in the day, the Assembly adopted without vote a number of plenary-generated draft resolutions, including on support by the United Nations system of the efforts of Governments to promote and consolidate new or restored democracies (document A/61/L.51); and on the report of its Credentials Committee for the sixty-first session.


The Assembly also adopted without vote several texts dealing with situations on the African Continent, including on the 2001-2010: Decade to Roll Back Malaria in Developing Countries, Particularly in Africa; the new Partnership for Africa’s Development(NEPAD):  progress in implementation and international support; on implementation of the recommendations contained in the report of the Secretary-General on the causes of conflict and promotion of durable peace and sustainable development in Africa; and on mandate review.


In other business, the Assembly took up the report of the Fourth Committee (Special Political and Decolonization) on implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and People by the specialized agencies and institutions associated with the United Nations (document A/61/413), adopting the relevant resolution therein by a recorded vote of 100 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 52 abstentions (see annex I).


On the recommendations of its Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian, Cultural) the Assembly took up the report on the human rights situation in Myanmar (document A/61/443/Add.3) along with programme budget implications (document A/61/666) and adopted a relevant resolution, as orally corrected, by a vote of 82 in favour to 25 against, with 45 abstentions (see annex II). 


The Assembly also adopted without a vote, a draft decision on the report of the Human Rights Council.


With the current scales for determining Member States’ dues to the United Nations regular and peacekeeping budgets fixed only through 31 December, the Assembly, by adopting the Fifth Committee’s recommendations on the scales of assessment for 2007-2009, opened the way for uninterrupted financing of the Organization’s activities.  The new scales had to be adopted during the main part of the session, to allow individual States’ assessments to be sent out at the beginning of 2007, and the Committee had reached a compromise decision on the matter, deciding to leave in place the main elements of the preceding budget scale, which had initially been set in 2000.


By a 17-part draft resolution on human resources management reform, the Assembly requested a review of the staff selection system, with emphasis on performance, and suggested a report to verify that the highest standards of efficiency, competence and integrity are applied in employment of staff, with due regard to achieving a wide geographical base.


It requested the Secretary-General to reduce the period required to fill vacancies by addressing the factors contributing to delays, and asked for further proposals in connection with his intention to establish a dedicated recruitment and staffing centre.  It also appropriated $3 million for leadership and management development and training, but decided not to pursue the Secretary-General’s proposal on staff buyout.


With the Office of Human Resources Management preparing to begin the execution phase of managed mobility in 2007, the Secretary-General was also asked to provide an analysis of the mobility programme, including its financial implications and usefulness, along with several reports on mobility policies and their results.  The Assembly requested the Secretary-General to present a detailed road map on the implementation of proposed unified contractual arrangements, asking for a report from the International Civil Service Commission (ICSC) on the proposal to introduce “one staff contract under one set of staff rules”.  As for the proposals on the harmonization of the conditions of service and the creation of a cadre of civilian peacekeeping positions, the Assembly decided to revert to those issues during its resumed session.


Also adopted today was a text on the United Nations common system, by the terms of which the Assembly approved the recommendations of the International Civil Service Commission (ICSC) on an increased level of hazard pay for internationally recruited staff, new arrangements for mobility and hardship grants, and revised amounts of children’s and secondary dependant’s allowances.  Also approved was the recommendation to adjust the base/floor salary scale for the Professional and higher categories by 4.57 per cent, on a no loss/no gain basis.


Other Fifth Committee texts adopted concerned a comprehensive review of governance and oversight within the United Nations system, which was undertaken by the steering committee of experts that undertook that exercise at the request of the 2005 World Summit; the ongoing procurement reform; the proposed strategic framework and preliminary budget outline for the next biennium; revised budget appropriations for the 2006-2007 biennium; the United Nations pension system; and financing of the Development Account, the International Tribunals and the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL).


The Assembly will reconvene at a time and date to be announced.


Background


The General Assembly met this afternoon to take up the reports of its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary), as well as to consider matters related to new or restored democracies, the Credentials Committee, the 2001-2010 Decade to Roll Back Malaria, the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD), follow-up to the Millennium Summit and human rights.


Plenary Documents


A draft on support by the United Nations system of the efforts of Governments to promote and consolidate new or restored democracies (document A/61/L.51) would have the Assembly urge the Secretary-General to continue to improve the capacity of the Organization in responding effectively to the requests of Member States by providing adequate support for their efforts to achieve the goals of good governance and democratization, including through the activities of the Democracy Fund at the United Nations.  It would further encourage Governments to strengthen national programmes devoted to the promotion and consolidation of democracy, including through increased bilateral, regional and international cooperation, taking into account innovative approaches and best practices.


A report of the Credentials Committee on credentials of representatives presented to the Assembly’s sixty-first session (document A/61/648) contains a resolution that would have the Assembly approve the report prepared on the basis of a memorandum of the Secretary-General in accordance with the Assembly’s rules of procedure. 


A draft 2001-2010:  Decade to Roll Back Malaria in Developing Countries, Particularly in Africa (document A/61/L.50) would have the Assembly call upon the international community to continue to support the “Roll Back Malaria” partner organizations, including the World Health Organization, the World Bank and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), as vital complementary sources for the efforts of malaria-endemic countries to combat the disease.  It would likewise appeal to the international community to work towards increased and sustained bilateral and multilateral assistance to combat malaria, including support for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, in order to assist States in the implementation of sound national plans to control malaria in a sustained and equitable way.


It would also have the Assembly urge malaria-endemic countries to work towards financial sustainability, to increase domestic resource allocation to malaria control and to create favourable conditions for working with the private sector in order to improve access to good quality malaria services.


In other provisions, the draft would urge all Member States experiencing resistance to conventional monotherapies to replace them with combination therapies, as recommended by the World Health Organization, to develop the necessary financial, legislative and regulatory mechanisms.  Finally, it would call upon malaria-endemic countries to encourage regional and intersectoral collaboration, both public and private, at all levels, especially in education, agriculture, economic development and the environment to advance malaria control objectives.


A draft resolution on the New Partnership for Africa’s Development:  progress in implementation and international support (document A/61/L.23/Rev.1), under the heading “actions by African countries and organizations”, would have the Assembly stress that conflict prevention, management and resolution and post-conflict consolidation are essential for the achievement of objectives of the New Partnership and also welcome the cooperation and support granted by the United Nations and development partners to the African regional and subregional organizations. 


On “response of the international community”, the Assembly would urge continued support of measures to address the challenges of poverty eradication and sustainable development in Africa, including debt relief, improved market access, support for the private sector and entrepreneurship, enhanced official development assistance and increased flows of foreign direct investment and transfer of technology.


In other provisions, the draft would call for a comprehensive and sustainable solution to the external debt problems of African countries, including cancellation or restructuring for heavily indebted African countries not part of the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries Initiative, with unsustainable debt burdens.


Finally, a draft decision on mandate review (document A/61/L.52) would have the Assembly decide to continue the process during the sixty-first session.  Submitted by the Assembly President, the decision and the review are part of the follow-up to the outcome of the Millennium Summit.


Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural) Documents


A draft on implementation of the recommendations contained in the report of the Secretary-General on the causes of conflict and promotion of durable peace and sustainable development in Africa (document A/61/L.41/Rev.1) would have the Assembly urge the United Nations and invite other development partners to increase their support for the African Union in order to enhance its capacity and effectiveness in the planning, deployment and management of peacekeeping operations and the advanced training to African peacekeepers.  It would also urge the donor community to replenish the Peace Fund of the African Union.


Furthermore, it would call for a holistic and coordinated approach at the national, regional and international levels to identify causes of each conflict as a means to improve the effectiveness of conflict prevention and resolution, crisis management, peacemaking, peacekeeping and post-conflict peacebuilding efforts in Africa. 


In other provisions, it would have the Assembly stress the critical importance of a regional approach to conflict prevention, particularly with respect to cross-border issues such as disarmament, demobilization and reintegration programmes, prevention of illegal exploitation of natural resources and trafficking of high-value commodities and the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons.


Finally, it would stress the importance of effectively addressing challenges which continue to hamper the achievement of peace and security on the continent, among others, youth unemployment, and the devastating social, economic and political impact of the HIV/AIDS crisis.  It would also call for the role of women in conflict prevention, conflict resolution and post-conflict peacebuilding to be enhanced.


Draft resolution II of addendum 3 to the Third Committee’s report on the promotion and protection of human rights (document A/61/443/Add.3) on the situation of human rights in Myanmar would have the Assembly express grave concern at ongoing systematic violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms of the people of Myanmar, including discrimination and violations suffered by persons belonging to ethnic nationalities, the continuing use of torture, deaths in custody, political arrests, continuing imprisonment and other detentions, as well as the continuing recruitment and use of child soldiers, the use of landmines, forced labour and denial of freedom of assembly, association, expression and movement.


It would also express grave concern at attacks by military forces on villages in Karen state and other ethnic states; continued severe restrictions on the National League for Democracy and other political parties, including the extension of the house arrest of the League’s General Secretary, Aung San Suu Kyi and her Deputy, Tin Oo; the absence of progress towards genuine democratic reform; the inability of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Myanmar and the former Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Myanmar to visit the country for almost three years; and the denial of freedom to human rights defenders.


It would have the Assembly strongly call upon the Government of Myanmar to end systematic human rights violations, military operations targeting civilians in ethnic areas, the recruitment and use of child soldiers and forced displacements.  It would further strongly call for the release of all political prisoners, immediately and unconditionally, the lifting of all restraints on peaceful political activity and safe and unhindered access to the entire country to the United Nations and international humanitarian organizations.  It would also call upon the Government of Myanmar to permit all political representatives and representatives of ethnic nationalities to participate fully in the political transitional process, to end the conflict with all ethnic nationalities in Myanmar and to restore the independence of the judiciary and due process of law.


The draft decision contained in the Third Committee’s report on the report of the Human Rights Council (document A/61/448) would have the Assembly take note of that report (document A/61/53).


Special Political Committee Document (Fourth Committee)


A report of the Special Political and Decolonization Committee on Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations (document A/61/413) contains one draft resolution, by which the Assembly would recommend that all States intensify efforts in the specialized agencies and other organizations of the United Nations system to ensure the full and effective implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples.  The Committee approved that text by a recorded vote on 11 October.


Fifth (Administrative and Budgetary) Committee Reports


Before the Assembly was a report on the financial reports and audited financial statements, and reports of the Board of Auditors (document A/61/631).  It commends the superior quality of reports and accepts the financial reports, audited financial statements and audit opinions of the Board on the organizations of the United Nations system.  Further, the Assembly would express its concern that the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS) has been unable to submit its financial statements to the Board, thereby preventing it from expressing an opinion on them.  By the text, UNOPS would be requested to ensure that the situation is not repeated in the future.


By the draft, the Assembly would also reiterate requests to the Secretary-General and executive heads of the Organization’s funds and programmes to ensure full implementation of the Board’s recommendations, as well as related recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ), and to hold programme managers accountable for non-compliance.  The Secretary-General would be requested to provide a full explanation for the delays in the implementation, in particular of the recommendations not fully implemented after two or more years.  In his future reports, the Secretary-General would be asked to indicate an expected time frame and priorities for the implementation of the recommendations, as well as the office holders to be held accountable.


A resolution on enhancing the role of the subregional offices of the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) is contained in the Committee’s report on efficiency and programme budget for 2006-2007 (document A/61/652).  By it, the Assembly would be requested to develop a comprehensive plan of action to strengthen those offices.  The Assembly would also recall its request to ensure that adequate resources are provided to continue their support for the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) and the regional communities of Africa.


By a draft on programme planning (document A/61/), the Assembly would adopt the proposed strategic framework for 2008-2009, the Organization’s principal policy directive for the biennium.  The first such document was prepared on a trial basis for 2006-2007, to replace the previous four-year plan.  By the text, the Assembly would take no decision on part one of that document, a plan outline for the biennium.  The Assembly would decide on eight main priorities for 2008-2009, on the basis of which the Secretary-General should prepare his next budget proposal: maintenance of international peace and security; sustainable development; development of Africa; human rights; coordination of humanitarian assistance; justice and international law; disarmament; and drug control, crime prevention and combating international terrorism.


Taking note of the Organization’s performance report for 2004-2005, the Assembly would recognize the role of the Committee for Programme and Coordination, encouraging it to provide action-oriented recommendations to enhance the effectiveness of the Organization.  The Secretary-General would be requested to ensure that future performance reports provide more detailed reasons for the less-than-full implementation of programmed outputs or the postponement or termination thereof.


A report related to the budgetary and financial situation of the organizations of the United Nations system contained a draft decision on the International Atomic Energy Agency (document A/61/632), adopted without a vote in the Committee.  By its terms, the Assembly would take note of the statistical report on the budgetary and financial situation of the organizations, prepared by the United Nations System Chief Executives Board for Coordination.  The ninth such report of its kind, it is the only system-wide source of statistics on the matter, grouped under such subject headings as regular resources, extra-budgetary resources, assessed contributions and working capital funds.


A resolution on pattern of conferences (document A/61/597) was adopted without a vote in the Committee.  It contains the Committee’s recommendations on the calendar of conferences and meetings; utilization of conference-servicing resources; the impact of the Capital Master Plan on the meetings at Headquarters; integrated global management of conference services; documentation- and publication-related matters; and questions related to interpretation and translation.


A resolution on the Joint Inspection Unit (document A/61/654) would have the Assembly welcome the Unit’s efforts to improve implementation of its reform process and would urge the Unit, as the only system-wide external oversight body, to continue to focus on system-wide issues relevant to the efficient functioning of all organizations to which it provides services.


A report on the United Nations common system (document A/61/663) contains a draft resolution in document A/C.5/61/L.27.


The report on the United Nations pension system (document A/61/664) has the text of a draft resolution contained in document A/C.5/61/L.29.


The Assembly also had before it the reports on the financing of the International Criminal Tribunal on Rwanda (document A/61/655) and financing of the International Tribunal on the Former Yugoslavia (document A/61/656).


The report on the scale of assessments for peacekeeping operations (document A/61/665) has the text of a resolution contained in another report (document A/C.5/61/L.26).  It would have the Assembly the endorse the updated composition of levels to be applied in adjusting regular budget scale rates to establish the rates of assessment for the period 2007-2009 as set forth in the Secretary-General’s report (document A/61/139 and Corr.1, annex II).  The changes are based on average per capita gross national income of Member States during the period 1999-2004.  The Assembly would also decide that Montenegro and Serbia should both be assigned to level I for 2006.  The structure of levels of contribution for peacekeeping operations would again be reviewed during the Assembly’s sixty-forth session.  The draft was approved without a vote in the Committee.


A draft resolution on comprehensive review of governance and oversight within the United Nations and its funds, programmes and specialized agencies and another on procurement reform  are contained in a report on integrated and coordinated implementation of conference and summit outcomes as related to measures and proposals for United Nations reform (document A/61/658). 


A 17-part draft resolution on human resources management (document A/61/658) addresses the issues of human resources management reform; recruitment and staffing; national competitive examinations; mobility; career development and support; contractual arrangements; harmonization of conditions of service; reform of the field service; building leadership and management capacity; measures to improve equitable geographic distribution; gender representation; accountability; human resources information technology; staff buyout; consultants and individual contractors; employment of retired staff; and other matters.


The Assembly also had before it draft resolutions on financing of the United Nations Operation in Côte d’Ivoire (document A/61/621), the Union Nations Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea (document A/61/617), the Integrated Mission in Timor-Leste (document A/61/644) and the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (document A/61/657).


A report on the programme budget for the biennium 2006-2007 (document A/61/592/Add.1 and 2) contains a draft on the Capital Master Plan.  It reiterates serious concern over the risks and deficiencies of the United Nations Headquarters complex and would have the Assembly approve the reconstruction to be completed in 2014, at a total cost of up to $1.88 billion and with a working capital reserve of $45 million.  The Plan would be funded on the basis of the regular budget scale of assessments for 2007.  Member States would be allowed, within a specified period, to select the option of one-time or multi-year payments.  The Assembly would also establish a letter of credit facility, to be used “as a last resort”.


Two resolutions and two decisions in addendum 2 were adopted without a vote in the Committee.  Resolution I on questions relating to the programme budget for the biennium 2006-2007 was adopted without a vote in the Committee, as was resolution II on programme budget for the biennium 2006-2007.  Draft decision I on the United Nations Fund for International Partnerships was adopted without a vote, as was decision II on comprehensive review of governance and oversight within the United Nations and its funds, programmes and specialized agencies.


Finally, a draft resolution on the proposed programme budget outline for the biennium 2008-2009 and a draft decision on questions deferred for future consideration are contained in a report on review of the efficiency of the administrative and financial functioning of the United Nations (document A/61/667), with the text of the resolution contained in document A/C.5/61/L.21 and the text of the decision contained in document A/C.5/61/L.21.


By the terms of the text on the 2008-2009 budget outline, the Assembly would invite the Secretary-General to prepare his budget proposal for the next biennium on the basis of an estimated $4.19 million at revised 2006-2007 rates.  In connection with the Secretary-General’s recommendation that the level of the Contingency Fund be adjusted upward by 0.6 per cent, from 0.75 per cent to 1.35 per cent of the overall level of resources, the Assembly would decide to set the level of that Fund at 0.75 per cent of the preliminary estimate for 2008-2009, requesting the Secretary-General to review the experience of the utilization of the Fund and report to the Assembly at its next session.


The Assembly would further take note of the observation of ACABQ that, as the Contingency Fund is set at a percentage of the overall level of resources, its amount increases with the size of the budget.  Moreover, the level of the Contingency Fund has almost never been exceeded.  Furthermore, in its resolution 60/283, the Assembly authorized the Secretary-General a limited discretion for budgetary implementation for the biennia 2006-2007 and 2008-2009, to enter into commitments up to $20 million in each biennium to meet the evolving needs of the Organization in attaining its mandated programmes and activities.  Under the circumstances, ACABQ recommends that the level of the Contingency Fund for 2008-2009 remain at 0.75 per cent.  In that connection, the Assembly, by today’s draft, would stress that the limited discretion experiment shall not imply any changes to the provisions guiding the use of the Contingency Fund.


A report on the scale of assessments (document A/61/512/Add.1) would be considered along with the draft resolution in document A/C.5/61/L.28).   It would have the Assembly reaffirm the obligation of all Member States to bear the expenses of the United Nations under the Charter and the fundamental principle that the expenses of the Organization are to be apportioned according to capacity to pay.  The Assembly would leave in place the main elements of the previous scale, basing individual countries’ assessments on their gross national income, with adjustments for external debt and low per capita income.  With minimum and maximum set for rates, called “floor” and “ceiling”, it would also keep the maximum rate, or the “ceiling”, at 22 per cent.  In 2000, that ceiling was reduced from 25 per cent and then applied to the Organization’s main contributor, the United States, with the points arising as a result of the change distributed pro rata among other States, except for those affected by the floor (0.001 per cent) and the least developed countries’ ceiling of 0.01 per cent.


Also by the draft, the Assembly would affirm that the determination of the scale shall remain its prerogative and request the Committee on Contributions, in accordance with its mandate and the rules of procedure, to review the elements of the methodology of the scale of assessments in order to reflect Member States’ capacity to pay and report thereon to the Assembly by the main part of its sixty-third session.  Notwithstanding the terms of financial regulation 3.9, the Secretary-General would be empowered to accept, at his discretion and after consultation with the Chairman of the Committee on Contributions, a portion of the contributions of Member States for the calendar years 2007, 2008 and 2009 in currencies other than the United States dollar.


The Assembly would urge all Member States to pay their assessed contributions in full, on time and without imposing conditions.  It would also take note of the report of the Secretary-General on multi-year payment plans and related conclusions and recommendations of the Committee on Contributions and encourage Member States in arrears to the United Nations to consider submitting multi-year payment plans.


Tribute to President of Turkmenistan


General Assembly President Sheikha HAYA RASHED AL KHALIFA ( Bahrain) began the meeting by paying tribute to the late President Saparmurat Niyazov of Turkmenistan, who passed away on 21 December. 


After observing a minute of silence in his memory, the Assembly heard additional expressions of condolences from ABOUBACAR IBRAHIM ABANI (Niger), on behalf of the African Group; ZAINOL RAHIM ZAINUDDIN (Malaysia), on behalf of the Asian Group; AMIR MUHAREMI (Croatia), on behalf of the Eastern European States; VICTOR CAMELLERI (Malta), on behalf of the Western European and other States; JOSEPH MELROSE (United States); YERZHAN KAZYKHANOV (Kazakhstan), on behalf of the Commonwealth of Independent States; and DINA MARTINA (Ukraine), on behalf of the GUAM States.


AKSOLTAN ATAEVA ( Turkmenistan) expressed her appreciation to Member States for their words of condolences and show of solidarity with Turkemistan at a time of grief and pain.  The people of her country had experienced great loss with the passing of their leader of 21 years, who was closely associated with the rebirth of Turkmenistan’s statehood.  Mr. Niyazov ensured that the world understood the country’s contribution to the world’s civilizations, all the while demonstrating an uncommon leadership ability and talent as a diplomat.


She said the thoughtful and consistent internal and foreign policies he spearheaded helped create the conditions needed for securing independence and had epitomized the interests of the people.  Mr. Niyazov also restored the mother tongue, with ancient roots, in addition to other traditions of the Turkmen people, and, in doing so, affirmed the principles of unity, solidarity and mutual trust.


She went on to say that, under his leadership, the country raised the standard of living of its people.  Meanwhile, harmonious relations with other nations helped Turkmenistan to gain its authority in the international arena, strengthening peace and stability in the central Asian region.  For example, negotiations that took place in 1995 to 1996, under his guidance and in conjunction with the United Nations, allowed for peace talks between warring parties during a time of civil conflict.  In addition, Turkmenistan provided technical and organizational support to facilitate the transfer of humanitarian cargo to the Afghan people, something that continued today.


She said Turkmenistan would continue to follow the political course set by their late leader, based on peace, humanism and justice.  It would pursue good neighbourly relations and mutually advantageous cooperation, while meeting its obligations under international charters and bilateral accords.


Action on Plenary Drafts


The representative of Qatar introduced the draft resolution on support by the United Nations system of the efforts of Governments to promote and consolidate new or restored democracies (document A/61/L.51).  Summarizing the Sixth International Conference of New or Restored Democracies held in Qatar from 29 October to 1 November, he said the Conference had two main objectives.  One was to enhance the linkages between democracy, peace and social progress in the global development agenda and the other was to initiate a systematic implementation and follow-up to consolidate achievements and recommendations of earlier Conferences.


He said a draft resolution had been issued as an outcome document with four objectives, which were to transmit the concrete results of the Conference; underline the close cooperation on the matter between the United Nations and Governments, as well as between Governments, parliamentarians and civil society; highlight the Conference theme, which was the importance of implementing resolutions; and to ask the Secretary-General to include a summary of the Conference in his report on the matter.


The Assembly adopted the resolution without a vote. 


Speaking in explanation of position after action, Venezuela’s representative said her country had always led in consolidating democratic values, peace and solidarity.  It would remain committed to supporting United Nations efforts in promoting and consolidating new and restored democracies.  However, the reference to the 2005 World Summit Outcome document did not constitute a mandate for her country. 


The representative of Japan said his country attached great value to democracy as a universal value.  The resolution urged the Secretary-General to continue to improve the capacity of the Organization to respond effectively to the requests of Members States in that regard by providing support for their efforts to achieve the goals of good governance and democratization, including through the United Nations Democracy Fund.  Towards that end, Japan would make a contribution to the Fund in the amount of $10 million.


The representative of Yemen said the resolution just adopted made no mention of the Conference resolution and that was unfortunate.


Next, the Assembly took up the report of the Credentials Committee (document A/61/648), containing one draft resolution.


GILES NOGHES ( Monaco), Chairman of the Credentials Committee, said that, in addition to Member States listed in paragraph 5 of the report, credentials had also been submitted by Lichtenstein, Monaco, Montenegro, Peru and Venezuela.  In addition to Member States listed in paragraph 6 of the report, Belgium, Belize, Ethiopia, Mozambique and Saint Lucia had provided the Secretary-General with information regarding the designation of their Permanent Representatives.


The draft resolution was then adopted, without a vote.


In an explanation of position after the action, the representative of Iran said his country joined the consensus on the resolution, but had reservations in parts of the report that might be construed as recognition of the Israeli regime.


Following that action, the Assembly took up the item entitled “2001-2010:  Decade to Roll Back Malaria in Developing Countries, Particularly in Africa”, whereupon the President recalled the Assembly’s debate on that agenda item on 12 and 13 October.


Introducing the draft resolution contained in that report (document A/61/L.50), the representative of Niger, on behalf of the African Group, said that up to 3 billion people in 107 countries and territories were still affected by malaria.  It was a global problem undermining economic development not just in Africa, but also in Asia, Latin America, Europe and the South Pacific.  The disease caused more than 1 million deaths, of which 86 per cent occurred in sub-Saharan Africa. 


He said that the African Group had tabled the resolution on the effort to roll back that preventable and curable disease, in line with Millennium Development Goal 6, and that it was an update of a similar resolution from last year.  Hopefully, the draft would be adopted by consensus.


The Assembly then adopted the draft, without a vote.


Taking up the item entitled “New Partnership for Africa’s Development:  progress in implementation and international support”, the Assembly turned its attention to a draft resolution of the same name (document A/61/L.23/Rev.1). 


Upon being told, by the Secretariat, that its adoption would not give rise to any financial implications, the Assembly adopted the draft text.


The Assembly also adopted, without a vote, a resolution on the causes of conflict and the promotion of durable peace and sustainable development in Africa (document A/61/L.41/Rev.1).


The Assembly next took up the resolution on mandate review (document A/61/52) as part of the implementation of the follow-up to the outcome of the Millennium Summit.


The resolution was adopted without a vote.


In explanation of position after action on behalf of the Non-Aligned Movement and the “Group of 77” developing countries and China, the representative of Egypt recapped the guidelines that had been set out for the mandate review.  For example, the exercise was to be conducted in an open and transparent manner in line with the Charter principles of fairness and non-discrimination.  Adequate financial resources were to be allocated to the process, which was intended to promote efficiency and effectiveness and was not meant to be a cost-cutting process.  Political motivation should be excluded from the process and the information working group should be involved in substantive mandates.  While the process was to have been finished by end of 2006, he was willing to continue the process as long as it was intended to improve the efficiency of the United Nations.


The representative of Japan said he welcomed the continuation of the mandate review process.


The Assembly then took up the report of the Fourth Committee (Special Political and Decolonization) on implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and People by the specialized agencies and institutions associated with the United Nations (document A/61/413).


Speaking in his capacity as Committee Rapporteur, Syria’s representative made textual clarifications on the draft.


The resolution was adopted by a recorded vote of 100 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 52 abstentions.  (See annex I.)


Speaking in explanation of vote, the representative of the United Kingdom said that the participation of Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) associates should be through Member States delegations, rather than as separate entities.


The representative of the United States said he had voted against the resolution.  While he agreed in principle that the funds, programmes and specialized agencies of the United Nations could provide support to non-United Nations members, it was only true so long as those territories’ laws allowed such support.  The United States considered it inappropriate to link the work of such agencies to the issue of colonial peoples and objected to provisions in the resolution making recommendations with respect to participation of territories in United Nations bodies.


He said it was up to the administrative powers in those territories and not the General Assembly or the Economic and Social Council to decide the nature, if any, of those territories’ participation in the Organization.  For example, the United States Federal Government had the sole responsibility for conducting the country’s foreign relations with those territories, using arrangements that had been accepted by them.  Meanwhile, the term “non-self-governing” seemed inappropriate for territories able to establish a constitution, hold elections, have representation in Washington, D.C., and choose its own economic path.


He said the United States was proud to welcome countries that chose independence as sovereign partners.  As for those that did not choose to be independent, the United States supported their right to exercise a full measure of self-government, including that of integration and free association.


Finally, he noted that, in supporting the resolution, its sponsors continued to ignore the wishes of the Economic and Social Council and its subsidiaries, since those bodies had themselves declined to adopt the resolutions for the reasons mentioned.


The Assembly concluded its consideration of the item and recessed to await reports from the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary).


Action on Third Committee Drafts


The Assembly took up the report on the human rights situation in Myanmar (document A/61/443/Add.3) along with programme budget implications (document A/61/666).


Before action, the representative of Finland, on behalf of the European Union, read out technical corrections to the text.


The draft was adopted, as orally corrected, by a recorded vote of 82 in favour to 25 against, with 45 abstentions.  (See annex II.)


The Assembly then took up a draft decision on the report of the Human Rights Council (document A/61/441/Corr.1).


The draft was adopted without a vote.


Action on Fifth Committee Reports


DIEGO SIMANCAS ( Mexico), Rapporteur of the Fifth Committee, introduced the reports.  He said all resolutions had been approved without vote, with the exception of a draft on the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) and some on programme budget implications.


The Assembly took up the resolution on the financial reports and audited financial statements, and reports of the Board of Auditors (document A/61/631).  The resolution was adopted without a vote.


A resolution was taken up on enhancing the role of the subregional offices of the Economic Commission for Africa as contained in the Committee’s report on efficiency and programme budget for 2006-2007 (document A/61/652).  It was adopted without a vote.


The Assembly took up the Committee’s report on programme planning (document A/61/653).  It was adopted without a vote.


Next, the Assembly took up a resolution on the budgetary and financial situation of the organizations of the United Nations system as contained in the Committee’s report on the International Atomic Energy Agency (document A/61/632).  It was adopted without a vote.


A resolution on pattern of conferences was taken up (document A/61/597) and adopted without a vote.


A resolution on the scale of assessments (document A/61/512/Add.1) was taken up, with the text of a draft resolution contained in document A/C.5/61/L.28.


The representative of Finland, speaking on behalf of the European Union, said that, while his delegation was a staunch supporter of the consensus principle, which was fundamental for the Fifth Committee decisions on budgetary matters, the Union had proposed changes to the methodology.  The Union believed that there were better, fairer and more balanced ways to share the budgetary responsibilities for the Organization.  The status quo was not sustainable in the long term.


The Union had gone into the negotiations with an open mind and looking forward to a debate, he said.  The delegation recognized that it had not been able to convince others to take its concerns into account.  With that in mind, the Assembly had now requested the Committee on Contributions to review the matter and present alternatives to the methodology reflecting the capacity to pay.  As the role of the United Nations had grown in recent years, the Organization’s budget had likewise increased and seemed likely to continue to do so.  As the largest contributor of resources, the European Union had great interest in ensuring that resources were spent in an efficient, effective and transparent way.


He said that the growing budget also made the United Nations more dependent on timely payments of contributions.  The Union had consistently shown its responsibility in that regard, and once again appealed to Member States to do the same -- pay in full, on time and without conditions.


The representative of South Africa, speaking on behalf of the “Group of 77” and China on the scale of assessments, said that, by adopting a resolution on that, the Assembly reaffirmed that the principle of “capacity to pay” remained the fundamental criterion in determining how expenses should be apportioned among Member States.  It would further ensure that the United Nations received adequate and predictable financing, in order to successfully implement the numerous mandates bestowed upon it.  While the final outcome did not reflect some of the concerns of developing countries, it was, nevertheless, a good one.


Though negotiations on the scale of assessments had been traditionally challenging, her delegation was encouraged by the transparency and spirit of compromise that all the negotiating groups and delegations had shown throughout.  The Group welcomed the resolution’s reaffirmation that the determination of the scale of assessments remained the prerogative of the Assembly, as well as reaffirming that the Committee on Contributions was a technical body, and that, in its consideration of the elements of future methodologies, needed to be guided by relevant Assembly resolutions and rules of procedure.


On the subject of principles relating to the elements of the scale’s methodology, the main element affecting and distorting the application of “capacity to pay” was the ceiling.  That was contrary to the Assembly’s intention, she continued, while it also placed an unfair burden on the rest of the membership.  In accordance with Assembly resolution 55/5 C, the rationale for reducing the ceiling to 22 per cent was to facilitate the payment of contributions and arrears by the main contributor.  Furthermore, the consensus decision in 2000 had been based on the understanding that the rationale for requesting the reduction would be honoured.  It was, thus, incumbent upon the Assembly to continue to undertake the review as stated in paragraph 2 of the draft.


She also emphasized that the lower per capita income adjustment had been an integral part of the scale methodology since its existence and, as such, needed to be maintained as a fundamental element.  Her delegation would both continue to oppose attempts to undermine that principle and maintain that the debt burden adjustment reflected an important factor in the capacity to pay of Member States.  She was concerned by attempts to eliminate that adjustment.  She also expressed concern over a number of Member States having faced substantial increases in their rates of assessment.  On that, she expected the Committee on Contributions to make proposals in addressing such increases through a phase-in mechanism.


The representative of Liechtenstein, speaking in explanation of vote, said that, under the new scale, her Government’s contribution to the United Nations budget would increase by 66 per cent, attaining a rate of assessment of 0.01 per cent.  Although Liechtenstein believed that rate did not accurately reflect its capacity to pay, the new scale had been accepted.  Her Government had been paying the difference between the former rate of 0.01 per cent and the subsequent rates of 0.005 and 0.006 per cent in the form of voluntary contributions.  She was pleased that, for the period of 2007 to 2009, Liechtenstein’s rate had attained the level always considered appropriate.  In light of that, her Government would stop making the additional contributions mentioned, while it would continue to make other kinds of voluntary contributions.


The representative of Mexico said that, given the shortcoming that continued to exist in the current system, he hoped his delegation’s recommendations would be taken into consideration.   Mexico had repeatedly asked that the United Nations be reformed to reflect today’s realities.  That held true for the scale of assessments.  Mexico was dedicated to ensuring transparency and credibility in the Organization’s assessment process.


The resolution on the scale of assessments was adopted without a vote.


Taking up the Fifth Committee’s report on the Joint Inspection Unit (document A/61/654), the Assembly adopted the resolution contained in it without a vote.


The Assembly took up the draft on the United Nations common system: report of the International Civil Service Commission (document A/61/663) with the text of the draft resolution contained in document A/C.5/61/L.27.  The resolution was adopted without a vote.


Next, the Assembly took up the United Nations pension system (document A/61/664), with the text of the draft resolution contained in document A/C.5/61/L.29, and adopted the resolution without a vote.


Moving on, the Assembly took up the reports on the financing of the International Criminal Tribunal on Rwanda (document A/61/655) and financing of the International Tribunal on the Former Yugoslavia (document A/61/656).  Both resolutions were adopted without a vote.


Next to be taken up was the scale of assessments for peacekeeping operations (document A/61/665), with the text of a resolution contained in document A/C.5/61/L.26.  The resolution was adopted without a vote.


The Assembly then adopted without a vote a draft resolution on human resource management (document A/61/659).


The Assembly next took up a draft resolution on comprehensive review of governance and oversight within the United Nations and its funds, programmes and specialized agencies and another on procurement reform in a report on integrated and coordinated implementation of conference and summit outcomes, as related to measures and proposals for United Nations reform (document A/61/658).  The resolutions were adopted without a vote.


Speaking in explanation of position after action, the Russian Federation’s representative said his delegation believed that the Assembly had been able to adopt a relatively balanced text on human resources management, but he expressed concern that it had not gone further on matters related to the granting of immunities for United Nations officials other than the Secretariat.  He believed that, in certain cases that had occurred concerning the granting of immunities, the Secretary-General had disregarded the provisions set out in Assembly resolution 56/280.  The Russian Federation supported the ability of all delegations to receive information on decisions taken by the Secretariat.


He said the Russian Federation believed that the efforts by some States to deny access to information on the premise that it might have some impact on the legal systems of those States could set a negative precedent for the future.  The Russian Federation expected the new Secretary-General to examine the whole issue more closely when he submitted his report on the basic rights and duties of officials other than the Secretariat, which the Assembly had repeatedly requested.


Next the Assembly took up draft resolutions on financing of the United Nations Operation in C ôte d’Ivoire (document A/61/621), of the Union Nations Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea (document A/61/617) and of the Integrated Mission in Timor-Leste (document A/61/644).  All three were adopted without a vote.


Taking up a resolution on the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) (document A/61/657), the text of separate paragraphs contained in preambular paragraph 4 and operative paragraphs 4, 5 and 21 were adopted by a recorded vote of 95 in favour to 5 against (United States, Palau, Israel, Australia, Canada), with 45 abstentions.  (See annex III.)  The resolution as a whole was adopted by a recorded vote of 145 in favour to 3 against ( United States, Israel, Palau), with 1 abstention ( Australia).  (See annex IV.)


Speaking in explanation of position after action, the representative of Syria said his delegation had voted in favour of the resolution financing UNIFIL based on the understanding that the responsibility of financing the Force must be borne by Israel, as the aggressor and occupier.


A draft resolution on programme budget implications of the UNIFIL draft document A/61/592/Add. 1 and 2) was adopted without a vote.


Speaking in explanation of position after that action, the representative of Syria said that he had expressed reservations about the logical framework of the budget of the Secretary-General’s Envoy for a number of reasons.  There was concern that there had been expansion of the mandate on the implementation of Security Council resolution 1559 (2004) to include some of the demands in resolution 1701 (2006).  First, that duplicated work in the Secretariat, and second, it led to taking resolution 1701 outside of its original context and in a direction outside of why it was adopted, that of ending Israeli aggression against Lebanon.


Furthermore, the logical framework ignored the continuing occupation of parts of southern Lebanon, as well as Israeli breaches of Lebanese airspace, he added.  It was a genuine threat to the sovereignty of Lebanon and the continuing breach of resolution 1559 by Israel.  It was imperative that the Secretary-General ensure that envoys have the highest degree of professionalism and neutrality.  He remained convinced that those guidelines would be followed in future appointments for the region.


The representative of Finland, speaking on behalf of the European Union, said that the objective applied under section 7 of the text should be taken in accordance with paragraph 91 of the relevant ACABQ report, and as clarified by the Chairman of ACABQ in the formal meeting of the Committee earlier today.


The Assembly next considered a report on the programme budget for the biennium 2006-2007 (document A/61/592/Add.1 and 2).  A resolution on the Capital Master Plan contained in addendum 1 was adopted without a vote.  Two resolutions and two decisions were contained in addendum 2.  Resolution I on questions relating to the programme budget for the biennium 2006-2007 was adopted without a vote, as was resolution II on programme budget for the biennium 2006-2007.  Draft decision I on the United Nations Fund for International Partnerships was adopted without a vote, as was decision II on comprehensive review of governance and oversight within the United Nations and its funds, programmes and specialized agencies.


Finally, a draft resolution on the proposed programme budget outline for the biennium 2008-2009 and a draft decision on questions deferred for future consideration were contained in a report on review of the efficiency of the administrative and financial functioning of the United Nations (document A/61/667), with the text of the resolution contained in document A/C.5/61/L.21 and the text of the decision contained in A/C.5/61/L.21.  Both were adopted without a vote.


Closing Statement by Assembly President


The President of the Assembly, Sheikha HAYA RASHED AL KHALIFA ( Bahrain), said that it had been an honour for her to preside over this “busy and productive” period of the Assembly’s work.  The plenary had met 83 times and its General Committee five times.  The Assembly had also held four meetings of its resumed tenth emergency session, twenty rounds of informal consultations and adopted 225 resolutions.


She said that, during the main part of the session, she had worked with Member States and outgoing Secretary-General Kofi Annan to build bridges and trust, and she intended to continue to do so when Secretary-General-designate Ban Ki-moon took office in the new year.  “You have shown that, when we are united in partnership and overcome mistrust, we can achieve much more for each other,” she said, noting that the adoption of a long-awaited resolution on strengthening the Economic and Social Council was a god example of that.


She went on to point to progress made on many other areas on the Assembly’s agenda, including the debate on Security Council reform, Assembly revitalization, Secretariat and management reform and a new scale of assessment.  She also noted that the Assembly had adopted two important international Conventions, respectively to protect and promote the rights and dignity of persons with disabilities, and to protect all persons from enforced disappearance.  She expressed the hope that there would be movement on Security Council reform in the new year, and that “we would be able to look at this matter in a fresh and innovative manner”, despite the fact that differences remained among Member States.


She also highlighted the informal thematic debate on development as an example of the increasing visibility of the Assembly, and expressed the hope that consensus would be reached on a comprehensive convention on international terrorism.  She also previewed the two thematic debates she planned to convene, this coming March on gender equality and the empowerment of women and, in the summer of 2007, on dialogue and tolerance among civilizations and cultures.  She expressed the hope that “we can begin the New Year by working even more closely together in the spirit of cooperation, mutual trust and collective responsibility”.


ANNEX I


Vote on Decolonization Declaration


The draft resolution on implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples (document A/61/413-II) was adopted by a recorded vote of 100 in favour to 1 against, with 52 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Dominica, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Libya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritius, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Qatar, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Micronesia (Federated States of), Moldova, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Chad, China, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominican Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Haiti, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Malawi, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mongolia, Montenegro, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Seychelles, Somalia, Tajikistan, Togo, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Vanuatu.


ANNEX II


Vote on Human Rights in Myanmar


The draft resolution on the situation of human rights in Myanmar (document A/61/443/Add.3) was adopted by a recorded vote of 82 in favour to 25 against, with 45 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burundi, Canada, Chile, Congo, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Moldova, Monaco, Morocco, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay.


Against:  Algeria, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belarus, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, China, Cuba, Egypt, Guinea, India, Indonesia, Iran, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Libya, Malaysia, Myanmar, Pakistan, Russian Federation, Sudan, Syria, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Zimbabwe.


Abstain:  Antigua and Barbuda, Bahrain, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Fiji, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Niger, Philippines, Qatar, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Swaziland, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Zambia.


Absent:  Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Grenada, Haiti, Iraq, Kiribati, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mongolia, Montenegro, Oman, Papua New Guinea, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Somalia, Tajikistan, Togo, Tonga, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Vanuatu.


ANNEX III


Vote on Separate Paragraphs in UNIFIL Text


Preambular paragraph 4 and operative paragraphs 4, 5 and 21 in the resolution on financing the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (document A/61/657) were retained by a recorded vote of 95 in favour to 5 against, with 46 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Cuba, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Australia, Canada, Israel, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Malta, Moldova, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uruguay.


Absent:  Angola, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Mongolia, Montenegro, Myanmar, Nauru, Nicaragua, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Tajikistan, Togo, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.


ANNEX IV


Vote on Financing of UNIFIL


The draft resolution on the financing of the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) (document A/61/657) was adopted by a recorded vote of 145 in favour to 3 against, with 1 abstention, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Monaco, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Australia.


Absent:  Angola, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Iran, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Luxembourg, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Mongolia, Montenegro, Myanmar, Nauru, Nicaragua, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Tajikistan, Togo, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.


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For information media • not an official record