30 June 2006
General Assembly
GA/10480

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixtieth General Assembly

Plenary

92nd Meeting (Night)


GENERAL ASSEMBLY LIFTS SPENDING CAP, ALLOWING UNITED NATIONS OPERATIONS


TO CONTINUE FOR REMAINDER OF 2006, 2007

 


Also Approves Resolutions on Development Follow-Up,

Capital Master Plan, Financing of Peacekeeping Operations


The General Assembly this evening, acting on the recommendations of its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary), decided to lift a “spending cap” of $950 million, narrowly averting financial crisis, and allowing the world body’s operations to continue for the remainder of 2006 and 2007.  It also decided on $4.72 billion for 13 active peacekeeping operations and adopted a comprehensive resolution on development.


Tonight’s consensus action follows the Fifth Committee’s decision two days ago to recommend that the Assembly lift the spending cap, authorizing expenditure of the remaining funds appropriated in the 2006-2007 budget.  At that meeting, South Africa’s representative, on behalf of the Group of 77 developing nations and China, said the spending had been tantamount to “abuse and poison”.  The representatives of the Australia, Japan and the United States, however, disassociating themselves from the consensus, said the purpose of the cap, namely to put in place much needed management reforms, had eluded the Organization.


Last December, the Assembly adopted the Organization’s budget for the 2006-2007 biennium in the amount of $3.79 billion, (resolution 60/247 A) adding a proviso that would -- “as an exceptional measure” -- limit the first portion of the Secretary-General’s expenditures for 2006 to $950 million.  Further, it also decided that, “in order to ensure the availability of resources for programme delivery, [it] will act in response to a request from the Secretary-General, at an appropriate time, for expenditure of the remaining funds”.  Such a request was made on 20 June.


As the Assembly took the decision to lift the spending cap this evening, the representatives of Australia, Japan and the United States disassociated themselves from consensus on the text.  Canada’s representative added that he was deeply distressed that the Assembly had not seized the moment and had failed to modernize the Organization.  That failure undermined the Organization’s credibility and, ultimately, support among the Governments of the world.  That was a decision with which Canada could not associate itself.  Management structures must be suited to the times.  The Organization could not confront new problems with antiquated structures. 


In other action, the Assembly adopted a 63-paragraph resolution on development follow-up.  Introducing the text, General Assembly President Jan Eliasson ( Sweden) said it was gratifying to agree on the effective implementation of the decisions of the 2005 World Summit in the development area, as commitments in that field and the full realization of the Millennium Development Goals remained fundamental tasks for the Organization.  With the adoption of the draft resolution, important steps would be taken in all three pillars of the United Nations: development, peace and security, and human rights.  It was now time to translate the words of commitments into action.  That must be done in light of the sombre realities in the world, as well as the millions of people whose lives and futures must be improved.


By the terms of the text, the Assembly called for concerted efforts by all to ensure the timely and full realization of the development goals and objectives agreed at the major United Nations conferences and summits, including the Millennium Development Goals, which have helped to galvanize efforts towards poverty eradication.  It also called on Member States and the United Nations system to translate all commitments made at the major United Nations conferences and summits, including the 2005 World Summit, in the economic, social and related fields, into concrete and specific actions, in order to, among other things, achieve the internationally agreed development goals, including the Millennium Development Goals.


The Assembly also stressed the need for the United Nations to play a fundamental role in the promotion of international cooperation for development and the coherence, coordination and implementation of the internationally agreed development goals, including the Millennium Development Goals, and resolve to strengthen coordination within the United Nations system, in close cooperation with all other multilateral financial, trade and development institutions, in order to support sustained economic growth, poverty and hunger eradication, and sustainable development.


Expressing disappointment with the resolution, the representative of South Africa, on behalf of the “Group of 77” developing countries and China, said the resolution was just a reiteration of already agreed language from the World Summit Outcome, and did not address issues of implementation.  Without concrete actions to implement all the commitments on trade, agricultural subsidies and the transfer of vitally needed resources to developing countries, the goal to fully realize the outcomes of all major summits and conferences by 2015 would not be realized.  He hoped that, in the coming years, all commitment undertaken would be implemented in a timely manner, so as to create a better life for all those millions of people who so desperately needed to be lifted out of dehumanising poverty.


The Assembly also approved some $4.72 billion for 13 active peacekeeping missions, as follows:


MINURSO ( Western Sahara)

$44,460,000


MINUSTAH ( Haiti)

$510,394,700


MONUC ( Dem. Republic of the Congo)

$1,138,533,000


ONUB ( Burundi)

$82,386,000


UNOCI ( Côte d’Ivoire)

$438,366,800


UNDOF (Israel-Syria Disengagement)

$41,588,400


UNFICYP ( Cyprus)

$46,770,000


UNIFIL ( Lebanon)

$97,579,600


UNOMIG (Georgia)

$34,827,000


UNMEE ( Ethiopia and Eritrea)

$182,237,800


UNMIK (Kosovo)

$227,400,400


UNMIL ( Liberia)

$745,572,300


UNMIS ( Sudan)

$1,126,295,900


Total

$4,716,411,900


The appropriation for each mission includes a prorated share for the Support Account and the United Nations Logistics Base in Brindisi.  The total requirements for the Support Account amount to some $183.19 million, and $35.48 million for the Logistics Base.


All but one of the peacekeeping resolutions –- that on the financing of the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) –- were adopted without a vote.  That text on UNIFIL was adopted by a vote of 150 in favour to 3 against ( Israel, Palau, United States), with 1 abstention ( Australia). (See Annex II.)


A separate vote was also held on several paragraphs of the text referring to earlier Assembly resolutions that called on Israel to pay for damages resulting from an Israeli assault on the UNIFIL base at Qana in southern Lebanon on 18 April 1996.  The Committee approved those paragraphs by a recorded vote of 99 in favour to 6 against (Israel, Australia, Canada, United States, Palau, Papua New Guinea), with 49 abstentions. (See Annex I.)


All the texts on specific peacekeeping missions included provisions, by which the General Assembly expressed, among other things, concern at the delays the Secretary-General has faced in deploying and providing adequate resources to some recent peacekeeping missions, particularly those in Africa.  The Assembly also emphasized that no peacekeeping mission shall be financed by borrowing funds from other active peacekeeping missions.


Adopting a 16-part text on cross-cutting issues of peacekeeping operations, the Assembly addressed all aspects of peacekeeping, ranging from high vacancy rates to accountability and fraud, procurement opportunities and quick-impact projects.


On accountability, fraud, corruption, mismanagement, misconduct and conflict of interest, the Assembly requested the Secretary-General to ensure that United Nations staff would be held accountable for any proven wrongdoings.  It further requested the Secretary-General to ensure that the application and enforcement of accountability be carried out impartially at all levels and without exception.  Regarding use of consultants, the Assembly requested the Secretary-General to ensure full utilization of synergies present in the United Nations system.


In addressing quick-impact projects, the Assembly would emphasize the need for a comprehensive policy, including on resource allocations, for such projects, and request the Secretary-General to address such matters as definition of projects, the duration of them and how administrative costs could be minimized.


Acting on special political missions, good offices and other political institutions authorized by the Assembly and the Security Council, the Committee recommended the appropriation of some $85.40 million for the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA), the International Independent Investigation Commission (IIIC) and the United Nations Office in Timor-Leste (UNOTIL).


Turning its attention to the Capital Master Plan, the Assembly approved, effective 1 July, Strategy IV for the implementation of the Capital Master Plan -- the phased approach -- as recommended by the Secretary-General, including the phasing, swing space and cost, and would decide to review the updated projected costs at the main part of the sixty-first session.  The Assembly decided to convert the existing commitment authority of $77 million into an appropriation with assessment on Member States in 2006.  The Assembly reverted consideration of several reports and the Funding Plan to its sixty-first session.


The Assembly also further authorized the Secretary-General to enter into commitments of up to $4.98 million under the 2006-2007 programme budget for additional office accommodation in Geneva for the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights.


Statements on development follow-up were also made by the representatives of Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Argentina, United States, Finland (on behalf of the European Union), Bahrain, Canada, United Arab Emirates, Pakistan and the Observer Mission of the Holy See.


At the conclusion of the meeting, the Assembly President informed Member States that the Fifth Committee would meet from 5 to 7 July to continue considering reform measures.


Text on Development


JAN ELIASSON ( Sweden), President of the General Assembly, introducing the draft resolution on the follow-up to the development outcome of the 2005 World Summit, said it had been more than nine months since leaders had adopted the World Summit Outcome.  It was gratifying to agree on the effective implementation of the decisions of the Summit in the development area, as commitments in that field, and the full realization of the Millennium Development Goals, remained fundamental tasks for the United Nations.  With the adoption of the draft resolution before the Assembly, important steps would be taken in all three pillars of the United Nations: development, peace and security, and human rights.


It was now time to translate the words of commitments into action, he said.  That must be done in light of the sombre realities in the world, as well as the millions of people whose lives and futures must be improved.  Agreement on the resolution on reform of the Economic and Social Council still needed to be reached.  There were also a few outstanding issues in the resolution.  A strengthened Economic and Social Council was in the interest of all Member States, and crucial for the standing of the economic and social issues on the agenda of the United Nations.


The Assembly first took up the draft resolution on follow-up to the development outcome of the 2005 World Summit, including the Millennium Development Goals and the other internationally agreed development goals (document A/60/L.59).


By the terms of the text, the Assembly would call for concerted efforts by all to ensure the timely and full realization of the development goals and objectives agreed at the major United Nations conferences and summits, including the Millennium Development Goals, which have helped to galvanize efforts towards poverty eradication.  It would call on Member States and the United Nations system, and invite international organizations and institutions, to translate all commitments made at the major United Nations conferences and summits, including the 2005 World Summit, in the economic, social and related fields into concrete and specific actions, in order to, among other things, achieve the internationally agreed development goals, including the Millennium Development Goals.


The Assembly would stress the need for the United Nations to play a fundamental role in the promotion of international cooperation for development and the coherence, coordination and implementation of the internationally agreed development goals, including the Millennium Development Goals, and resolve to strengthen coordination within the United Nations system, in close cooperation with all other multilateral financial, trade and development institutions, in order to support sustained economic growth, poverty and hunger eradication and sustainable development.


Welcoming efforts by developing countries to implement national development strategies, the Assembly would call on those countries that have not yet done so to adopt such strategies by 2006, and, in this regard, call on developed countries and the international community to support those efforts, as set out in the 2005 World Summit Outcome, including through increased resources.  Calling upon all countries to promote good governance, it would reaffirm that sound economic policies, solid democratic institutions responsive to the needs of the people and improved infrastructure are the basis for sustained economic growth, poverty eradication and employment creation, and that freedom, peace and security, domestic stability, respect for human rights, the rule of law, gender equality and market-oriented policies are also essential and mutually reinforcing.


By yet other terms, the Assembly would resolve to encourage greater direct investment, including foreign direct investment, in developing countries and countries with economies in transition, to support their development activities and to enhance the benefits they can derive from such investments, including, among other things, continuing to support efforts by developing countries and countries with economies in transition to create a domestic environment conducive to attracting investments; putting in place policies to ensure adequate investment in a sustainable manner in health, clean water and housing; and underscoring the need to sustain sufficient and stable private financial flows to developing countries and countries with economies in transition.


Acknowledging recent increases and commitments to substantial increases in official development assistance, the Assembly would welcome the increased resources that are becoming available, as a result of the establishment of timetables by many developed countries to achieve the target of 0.7 per cent of gross national income for official development assistance, as well as the target of 0.15 per cent to 0.2 per cent for least developed countries.  It would urge those developed countries that have not yet done so to make concerted efforts in that regard, in accordance with their commitments.


The Assembly would, by further terms, call for the consideration of additional measures and initiatives aimed at ensuring long-term debt sustainability through increased grant-based financing, cancellation of 100 per cent of the official multilateral and bilateral debt of heavily indebted poor countries and, where appropriate and on a case-by-case basis, significant debt relief or restructuring for low- and middle-income developing countries with an unsustainable debt burden that are not part of the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) Debt Initiative.


The Assembly would also request the specialized agencies, and invite the Bretton Woods institutions and the World Trade Organization, to keep it informed about their contribution to the implementation of the outcomes of all major United Nations conferences and summits in the socio-economic and related fields, and stress the need to develop and promote innovate and additional sources of financing for development to increase traditional sources of financing.  It would call for the implementation of commitments in the Brussels Programme of Action on the objective of duty- and quota-free market access for all products of the least developed countries, to the markets of developed countries.


The Assembly would also call upon Member States to achieve the goal of universal access to reproductive health by 2015, as set out at the International Conference on Population and Development, integrating this goal in strategies to attain the internationally agreed development goals, including the Millennium Development Goals.  Calling for the full implementation of Agenda 21 and the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation, taking into account the Rio Principles, it would call for the promotion of the integration of the three components of sustainable development, economic development, social development and environmental protection, as mutually reinforcing pillars, and, to that end, call for concrete action.


Emphasizing the need to meet all the commitments and obligations undertaken in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and other relevant international agreements, including the Kyoto Protocol, the Assembly would reaffirm the commitment to moving forward the global discussion on long-term cooperative action to address climate change, in accordance with the principles enshrined in the Convention, of common but differentiated responsibilities.


By other terms, the Assembly would call for action to promote conditions for cheaper, faster and safer transfers of remittances in both source and recipient countries and, as appropriate, to encourage opportunities for development-oriented investment in recipient countries by beneficiaries that are willing and able to do so.  Stressing the important nexus between international migration and development, it would look forward to the General Assembly High-level Dialogue on International Migration and Development, to be held at Headquarters on 13 and 14 September, as an opportunity to discuss the multidimensional aspects of international migration, in order to identify appropriate ways to maximize its development benefits and minimize its negative impacts.


The Assembly would, by other terms, call upon all countries to pursue all necessary efforts to scale up nationally driven, sustainable and comprehensive responses to achieve broad, multisectoral coverage for prevention, treatment, care and support, with full and active participation of people living with HIV, among others, and the private sector, towards the goal of universal access to comprehensive HIV/AIDS prevention programmes, treatment, care and support by 2010.


The Assembly would emphasize the need to strengthen its role as the highest intergovernmental mechanism for the formulation and appraisal of policy on matters relating to coordinated and integrated follow-up to the major United Nations conferences and summits in the socio-economic field.  It would reiterate that the Economic and Social Council should strengthen its role as the central mechanism for system-wide coordination and, thus, promote the integrated and coordinated implementation of and follow-up to the outcomes of the major United Nations conferences.  The functional commissions, when mandated, should have the primary responsibility for the review and assessment of progress made in implementing the outcomes of the United Nations conferences and summits in the socio-economic and related fields.


Also according to the text, the Assembly would stress that all relevant organs, organizations and United Nations bodies should, in accordance with their respective mandates, strengthen their focus on the implementation of and follow-up to the outcome of the 2005 World Summit on development and the other major United Nations conferences and summits.


Emphasizing the need for a substantial increase in resources for operational activities for development on a predictable, continuous and assured basis to enable the United Nations funds and programmes and the specialized agencies to contribute effectively to the implementation of the outcomes of major United Nations conferences and summits, the Assembly would reiterate the need for continuous improvement in the effectiveness, efficiency, management and impact of the United Nations system in delivering its development assistance.  It would decide to dedicate a specific meeting focused on development, including an assessment of progress over the previous year, in each session of the Assembly, during the debate on the follow-up to the Millennium Declaration and the 2005 World Summit Outcome.  It would also emphasize the need for adequate and substantive preparation for the review conference on the implementation of the Monterrey Consensus.


DUMISANI S. KUMALO (South Africa), speaking on behalf of the “Group of 77” developing countries and China, said a process had been completed, which had started eight months ago.  The Group had hoped that a follow-up to the World Summit would lead along a path to enhance the momentum gained by the Outcome, to fully realize and implement the commitments of all major summits and conferences in the economic and social related fields, including the Millennium Development Goals, and help create an environment that would enhance global political will on the necessity of improving the lives of over a billion people who lived below the poverty line.


He said the resolution did not reflect issues of implementation.  In many cases, it was just a reiteration of already agreed language from the World Summit Outcome.  Without concrete actions to implement all the commitments on trade, agricultural subsidies and the transfer of vitally needed resources to developing countries, the goal to fully realize the outcomes of all major summits and conferences by 2015 would not be realized.  There was no political will to create an equitable and balanced financial, economic and social global order, which was necessary for creating a framework for implementation in an integrated, coordinated and comprehensive approach in the global partnership for development.


He said the resolution did not take the concept of national responsibility further into the realm of implementation, in the context of how developing countries could be assisted, so as to enable them to achieve the internationally agreed development goals, including the Millennium Development Goals.


The Group had two regrets, he said.  The first was that there was a reluctance to improve the structure of the resolution by slight reordering of paragraphs.  The second regret was that, during the negotiations, the generous offer by the Emir of Qatar to host a review conference on the implementation of the Monterrey Consensus had been left out, because of the objection of some partners.  The irony was that the Assembly already had accepted that offer in its resolution 60/188.


In conclusion, he said that he hoped that, in the coming years, all commitments undertaken would be implemented in a timely manner, so as to create a better life for all those millions of people who so desperately needed to be lifted out of dehumanising poverty.


Speaking in explanation of position before the decision, Qatar’s representative said his country was a partner for international efforts to bring about development, particularly concerning combating of poverty, and increasing development in a more just more manner around the world.  Qatar supported all international initiatives on development, and had been honoured to host the fourth ministerial conference of the World Trade Organization (WTO), which had led to the adoption of the Doha agenda.  Qatar had also hosted the second summit of the States of the South in 2005, at which time it had presented an initiative to establish a development fund.


On the offer to host a conference, he said Qatar had proposed the first review conference in 2007 to bring more progress in the area of development.  The Emir’s initiative had enjoyed the support of many Heads of State.  The General Assembly had welcomed Qatar’s initiative in resolution 60/188 on financing for development.  He had hoped that paragraph 62 of the draft resolution would stipulate a clear formulation to hold the first review conference in Qatar, as resolution 60/188 had welcomed the initiative.  It was regrettable that the draft about to be adopted had completely neglected referring to that initiative.  While expressing disappointment that the paragraph had been taken out of the resolution, he would join consensus concerning the draft, hoping that that mistake would be corrected during the negotiations on the preparatory part of the review conference.


Mr. ELIASSON noted that Qatar’s representative had reiterated the offer today.


Saudi Arabia ’s representative also supported the offer by Qatar to hold the first review conference in Doha, welcomed in resolution 60/188 on financing for development.  He looked forward to the adoption of a resolution, during the sixty-first session, responding to that initiative, in light of Qatar’s intense efforts to combat poverty.  He joined the consensus on the draft in that light.


The representative of Argentina, also speaking on behalf of Guatemala, said that, as a medium-income country, Argentina celebrated the achievement of the resolution.  He reiterated that his delegation would work to achieve consensus on the offer of Qatar to have Doha as host for the Monterrey follow-up conference.


The Assembly then adopted the resolution without a vote.


In explanation of the vote after the vote, the representative of the United States said negotiations on the resolution had been difficult not because of fundamental disagreement between Member States, but because of the complex issues involved.  The outcome was a good one.  However, commitment was not enough, implementation was the key.  He understood that references to the International Conference on Population and the Beijing Conference, as well as the use of the phrase reproductive health, did not mean any approval of abortion.


Also in explanation of position, the representative of Finland, speaking on behalf of the European Union, said the resolution was a complex one, but the follow-up to the World Summit would benefit from it.  The follow-up to development-related provisions could only be ensured through a long-term process.  The resolution was only a first step in that process.


The representative of Bahrain said he agreed with Qatar regarding paragraph 62.  He had hoped that the proposal of the Group of 77 would have been included.  He had accepted the current formulation, on the understanding that the matter would be corrected.


Canada’s representative said he took the floor in explanation of position.  Although Canada did not want to stand in the way of consensus, he expressed concerns about the challenges to achieve the greenhouse gas levels in the Kyoto Protocol, and was ready to deal with climate change within the Framework Convention.  At present, there was development of a new action programme dealing with air pollution that would enable a reduction of greenhouse gases.  


The representative of the United Arab Emirates, speaking in explanation of position, said he supported South Africa’s statement on the issue.  He had hoped that paragraph 62 would reflect the initiative by the Emir of Qatar to host the first review conference.  Since that initiative was a matter of great importance for pushing international cooperation ahead, he looked forward to activating the initiative during negotiations to be conducted on the agreement for the preparatory work for the review conference.

Pakistan’s representative said he was pleased that the resolution had been adopted by consensus.  The resolution repeated many of the commitments made in the past.  He hoped it would work to build a strong robust mechanism at the United Nations to ensure effective implementation.  He supported the statement by Qatar regarding the offer to host the first review conference in Doha.


The representative of the Observer Mission of the Holy See welcomed the resolution on the follow up of the 2005 World Summit, which renewed Member States commitment to work in favour of development.  He welcomed all measures to provide the achievement of equal rights everywhere and promote social progress.  While he supported the resolution, the term “reproductive health” and reaffirmation of the full implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action did not endorse the right to abortion or access to it as a service.


Reports of Fifth Committee


The Assembly first adopted a draft resolution on the “Financial reports and audited financial statements, and reports of the Board of Auditors” (document A/60/561/Add.1), by which it accepted the audited financial statement on the United Nations peacekeeping operations for the period from 1 July 2004 to 30 June 2005, and endorsed the recommendations contained in the report of the Board of Auditors.  It requested the Secretary-General to indicate an expected time frame for the recommendations’ implementation.


The Assembly then adopted a draft decision contained in document A/60/606/Add.1, by which it took note of the report of the Secretary-General on revised estimates arising in respect of Security Council resolution 1660 (2006) on the appointment of reserve judges at the International Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (document A/60/844), and requested the Secretary-General to report on any additional requirements arising from the appointment of the three reserve judges in the context of the second performance report for the biennium 2006-2007.


The Assembly then took up the Fifth Committee report on “Administrative and budgetary aspects of the financing of the United Nations peacekeeping missions” (document A/60/916), which contained three draft resolutions.


The first resolution was a 16-part text on cross-cutting issues, ranging from high vacancy rates to accountability, fraud, corruption, mismanagement, misconduct and conflict of interest, procurement opportunities and quick-impact projects.


On budget presentation, the Assembly, expressing regret at the late issuance and receipt of budgets of some operations, would request the Secretary-General to improve timely submission of peacekeeping budgets.  It further requested the Secretary-General to continue to undertake the review of staffing requirements, function and level of posts that reflected evolving mandates, changing operational requirements, actual responsibilities and function performed.


Regarding use of consultants, the Assembly requested the Secretary-General to ensure full utilization of synergies present in the United Nations system and to develop an effective evaluation mechanism for the use of outside expertise.  Addressing the issue of high vacancy rates, the Assembly requested the Secretary-General to intensify efforts, including through innovative approaches, to ensure the expeditious filling of all vacant post and to continue to ensure greater use of national staff.


On accountability, fraud, corruption, mismanagement, misconduct and conflict of interest, the Assembly noted with concern observations by the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ), the Board of Auditors and the Office of Internal Oversight Services (OIOS), and requested the Secretary-General to ensure that United Nations staff were held accountable for any proven wrongdoings.  It further requested the Secretary-General to ensure that the application and enforcement of accountability be carried out impartially at all levels, and without exception.


As for quick-impact projects, the Assembly stressed that they were an integral part of mission planning and development, as well as of the implementation of comprehensive strategies to meet the challenges facing complex peacekeeping operations.  It emphasized the need for a comprehensive policy, including on resource allocations, for such projects, and requested the Secretary-General to address such matters as definition of projects, the duration of them and how administrative costs could be minimized.


Turning to the staffing of field missions, including the use of 300-series and 100-series appointments, the Assembly decided to continue to suspend the application of the four-year maximum limit for appointments of limited duration, until 31 December.  It authorized the Secretary-General to reappoint, under the 100-series of the Staff Rules, those mission staff whose service under 300-series contracts has reached the four-year limit by 31 December, and requested him to continue the practice of using 300-series contracts as the primary instrument for the appointment of new staff.


Other sections of the draft addressed such issues as integrated missions, regional cooperation, fuel management, costing structure for air operations, spare parts, better use of technology, disaster recovery and strategic deployment stocks.


The Assembly adopted the resolution without a vote.


The Assembly also adopted without a vote a draft resolution on the Financing of the United Nations Logistics Base at Brindisi, Italy, by which the Assembly approved the cost-estimates for the Base, amounting to $35.48 million for the period from 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2007, and took note of the Secretary-General’s proposal to establish, at the Base during the fiscal year 2007/2008, a strategic air operations centre, an aviation quality assurance programme, a central design unit and a geographical information system centre.


The Assembly requested the Secretary-General to provide it, at its sixty-first session, detailed information on the efficiency and effectiveness of all Department of Peacekeeping Operations training programmes to be implemented at the Base, drawing a comparison with training programmes provided at other facilities and United Nations offices.  The Assembly reiterated the need to implement, as a matter of priority, an effective inventory management standard, especially in respect of peacekeeping operations involving high inventory value.


The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, a draft resolution on the support account for peacekeeping operations, by which the Assembly approved the support account requirements in the amount of $183.19 million for the period from 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2007, including 734 continuing and 56 new temporary posts, and their related post and non-post requirements. 


While it approved several posts, the Assembly decided not to approve the P-4 post of Security Coordinator Officer in the Department of Safety and Security, and requested the Secretary-General to re-justify the requirement for that post.  The Assembly approved $23.27 million in general temporary assistance, and an amount of $4.42 million in non-post resources for the African Peacekeeping Capacity in the Department of Peacekeeping Operations, Office of Internal Oversight Services (OIOS), Procurement Service, Headquarters Contracts Committee in the Department of Management, procurement related functions in the Office of legal Affairs and in the Department of Peacekeeping Operations, and conduct and discipline capacity in the Department of Peacekeeping Operations.  The Assembly did not approve $154,200 under consultancy.


The Assembly noted with concern that the financial provision for consultants has steadily increased in recent years, and requested the Secretary-General, when proposing resources for consultancies, to include a trend analysis, comparing the requested resource levels with the approved resource levels in the previous five years. The Assembly also requested the Secretary-General to report in the sixty-first session on efforts made in support of the African Union capacity-building.


The Assembly then adopted a draft resolution on the Financing of the United Nations Operation in Burundi (ONUB) (document A/60/917), by which it authorized the Secretary-General to enter into commitments for the period from 1 July to 31 October an amount not exceeding $78.96 million for the maintenance of the Operation, some $2.83 million (gross) for the support account and $596,400 for the United Nations Logistics Base.


The Assembly took note of the status of contributions to the Operation as at 30 April, including outstanding contributions of $47.3 million (some 7 per cent of total assessments), and noted with concern that only 39 Member States had paid their contributions in full.  The Assembly endorsed the conclusions and recommendations of the ACABQ.


The Assembly also approved a draft resolution on the financing of the United Nations Operation in Côte d’Ivoire (document A/60/540/Add.1) by which it decided to appropriate some $438.4 million to the Special Account for the Operation, inclusive of $420.18 million for the Operation’s maintenance, $15.02 million for the Support Account for peacekeeping operations and $3.2 million for the United Nations Logistics Base.


The Assembly took note of the status of contributions to the Operation as at 30 April, including outstanding contributions in the amount of $80.7 million (some 9 per cent of total assessments), and noted with concern that only 28 Member States had paid their assessed contributions in full.


The Assembly then took up a draft resolution on the financing of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) (document A/60/918), adopting the text without a vote.


By the terms of the text, the Assembly took note of the status of contributions to the Force as of 30 April 2006, including outstanding contributions in the amount of $16.9 million, representing about 6 per cent of the total assessed contributions.  It decided to finance resources for conduct and discipline equivalent to $253,900 under general temporary assistance.


Also according to the draft, the Assembly took note of the Secretary-General’s report on the financial performance for the Force for the period from 1 July 2004 to 30 June 2005.  It decided to appropriate to the Special Account for UNFICYP the amount of $46.77 million for the period from 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2007, including $44.83 million for the Force’s maintenance, $1.6 million for the peacekeeping support account and $337,400 for the United Nations Logistics Base.


The Assembly noted with appreciation that a one-third share of the net appropriation will be funded through voluntary contributions from the Government of Cyprus and the amount of $6.5 million from the Government of Greece.  It decided, taking into account its voluntary contribution for the financial period ending 30 June 2005, that the prorated share of the net unspent balance in the amount of $331,400 for the period ending 30 June 2005 shall be returned to the Government of Cyprus.  Also, taking into account its voluntary contribution for the period ending 30 June 2005, it decided that that prorated share of the net unspent balance in the amount of $130,989 shall be returned to Greece’s Government.


The Assembly then adopted a draft resolution on the financing of the United Nations Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC) (document A/60/574/Add.1), by which it would decide to appropriate to the Special Account for the Mission the amount of some $1.14 billion for the period from 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2007, inclusive of $1.1 billion for the Mission’s maintenance, $39.1 million for the Support Account for peacekeeping operations and $8.23 million for the United Nations Logistics Base.


The Assembly took note of the status of contributions as of 30 April, including outstanding contributions of $172.1 million (some 5 per cent of total assessments), noting with concern that only 57 Member States have paid their contributions in full.  It also noted with concern the late submission of the reports related to the financing of the Mission.  It welcomed the establishment and development of the logistics base for the Mission at Entebbe, Uganda, as a regional hub for common use by missions in the region.


The Assembly requested the Secretary-General to ensure that the recommendations of the consultant’s report on the comprehensive review of staffing and structure of the Mission be fully analysed by the Mission itself and that its results be reflected in the next budget.  Requesting the Secretary-General to ensure that quick-impact projects are implemented in compliance with the original intent of such projects, the Assembly decided to approve the requested resources for the projects in the interim.


The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, a resolution on the financing of the United Nations Mission of Support in East Timor (document A/60/919), by which the Assembly decided on the unencumbered balance and other income amounting to $16.78 million in respect of the financial period ended 30 June 2005.  It took note of the Secretary-General’s report on the final disposition of the Mission’s asset (document A/60/703).


The Assembly took note of the status of contributions to the United Nations Transitional Administration in East Timor (UNTAET) and the United Nations Mission of support in East Timor as at 30 April, including outstanding contributions amounting to $36.1 million (some 2 per cent of total assessments), noting with concern that only 105 Member States have paid their contributions in full.


The Assembly then approved, also without a vote, a text on financing of the United Nations Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea (UNMEE) (document A/60/920), by which it decided to appropriate to the Mission’s Special Account the amount for the period from 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2007 that included $174.7 million for the maintenance of the Mission, $6.23 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $1.31 million for the United Nations Logistics Base.  It also decided to finance resources for conduct and discipline capacity equivalent to $622,300 under general temporary assistance.


Taking note of the status of contributions to the UNMEE as at 30 April, including outstanding contribution of $29 million (some 2.6 per cent of total assessed contributions), the Assembly noted with concern that only 18 Member States had paid their assessed contributions in full.


The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, a draft resolution on the financing of the United Nations Observer Mission in Georgia (UNOMIG) (document A/60/921), by which it took note of the status of contributions to the Mission as of 30 April 2006, including outstanding contributions of some $16.8 million, representing about 6 per cent of the total assessed contributions and noted with concern that only 33 Member States have paid their assessed contributions in full.  It also took note of the Secretary-General’s report on the Observer Mission’s performance for the period from 1 July 2004 to 30 June 2005.


The Assembly further decided to appropriate to the Special Account for UNOMIG the amount of $34.83 million for the period from 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2007, including $33.4 million for the Mission’s maintenance, $1.2 million for the Support Account and $252,200 for the Logistics Base.  It decided that, for Member States that have fulfilled their financial obligations to the Mission, there shall be set off against their apportionment their respective share of the unspent balance of $1.85 million in respect of the financial period ending 30 June 2005.  For Member States that have not fulfilled their financial obligations, there shall be set off against their outstanding obligations their respective share of the unspent balance of $1.85 million for the financial period ending 30 June 2005.


The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, a draft resolution on the financing of the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) (document A/60/541/Add.1) by which it decided to appropriate $510.4 million to the Mission’s Special Account, inclusive of $489.21 million for its maintenance, $17.5 million for the Support Account for peacekeeping operations and $3.7 million for the Logistics Base.


The Assembly took note of the status of contributions to the Mission as at 30 April, including outstanding contributions of $66.8 million (some 11 per cent of total assessments), noting with concern that only 35 Member States had met their obligations in full.  It endorsed the conclusions and recommendations of the ACABQ and request the Secretary-General to ensure that future budget submissions include clear information regarding mandated disarmament, demobilization and reintegration activities, as well as to review the use of consultants in that area.


The Assembly also decided to approve the resources requested for quick-impact projects in the proposed budget, and request the Secretary-General to ensure full implementation of the projects for the financial period 2006-2007.  The Assembly noted that full information for the need for the establishment of an offsite, in-theatre secondary disaster recovery and business continuity centre for the Mission has yet to be provided.


The Assembly next adopted, without a vote, a draft resolution on the financing of the United Nations Iraq-Kuwait Observation Mission (UNIKOM) (document A/60/922), by which it took note of the status of contributions to the Mission as of 30 April 2006, including outstanding contributions of some $3.9 million, representing about 1 per cent of the total assessed contributions, and note with concern that only 141 member States had paid their assessed contributions in full.  It would express its continued appreciation to Kuwait’s Government to defray two thirds of the cost of the Observation Mission, effective 1 November 1993.


Endorsing the ACABQ’s recommendations, the Assembly also decided that, taking into account the Kuwait’s voluntary contributions, two thirds of the cash balance available as of 30 June 2005 in the amount of $27.84 million shall be returned to the Government.  It also decided that for Member States that have fulfilled their financial obligations to the Mission, there shall be credited their respective share of the remaining balance as of 30 June 2005 in the amount of $13.92 million.  It further decided that, for Member States that had not fulfilled their financial obligations to the Mission, their respective share of the remaining balance as of 30 June 2005 shall be set off against their outstanding obligations.


Acting without a vote, the Assembly then approved a draft resolution on the financing of United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) (document A/60/923), by which it decided to appropriate to the Mission’s Special Account the amount of $227.4 million for the period from 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2007, inclusive of $217.96 million for the Mission’s maintenance, $7.8 million for the Support Account for peacekeeping operations and $1.64 million for the United Nations Logistics Base.  The Assembly also decided to finance capacity for conduct and discipline the equivalent of $601,300 under general temporary assistance.


By other terms, the Assembly took note of the status of contributions to the Mission as at 30 April, including outstanding contributions of $58.7 million (some 2 per cent of the total assessed contributions), noting with concern that only 83 Member States had paid their assessed contributions in full.  It endorsed the conclusions and recommendations of the ACABQ, subject to the provisions of the present resolution.


The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, a draft resolution on the financing of United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL) (document A//60/924), by which it decided to appropriate to the Mission’s Special Account the amount of $745.6 million for the period from 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2007, inclusive of $714.61 million for the Mission’s maintenance, $25.6 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $5.4 million for the United Nations Logistics Base.


The Assembly took note of the status of contributions to the Mission as at 30 April, including outstanding contributions of $212.9 million (some 8.9 per cent of the total assessed contributions), noting with concern that only six Member States had paid their assessed contributions in full.  It endorsed the conclusions and recommendations of the ACABQ, subject to the provisions of the present resolution.


Also according to the text, the Assembly decided to provide $1 million for quick-impact projects for the period 2006-2007 in the interim and would request the Secretary-General to utilize resources in strict compliance with the original intent of that type of project.


The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, a draft resolution on the financing of the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF) (document A/60/925), by which it decided to appropriate to the Force’s Special Account $41.6 million, inclusive of $39.87 million for the maintenance of the Force, $1.42 million for the Support Account for peacekeeping operations and $299,900 for the United Nations Logistics Base.


The Assembly also took note of the status of contributions to the Force as at 30 April, including outstanding contributions in the amount of $20.1 million (some 1 per cent of the total assessments), noting with concern that only 40 Member States had paid their contributions in full.  It endorsed also the conclusions and recommendations of the ACABQ.


The Assembly then took up a draft resolution on the financing of the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) (document A/60/928) by which it would decide to appropriate to the Force’s Special Account the amount of $97.58 million for the period from 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2007, inclusive of $93.53 million for the maintenance of the Force, $3.35 million for the Support Account for peacekeeping operations and $705,400 for the United Nations Logistics Base.


Expressing deep concern that Israel did not comply with Assembly resolutions, the first being 51/233 and the last 59/307, the Assembly would stress once again that Israel should comply with them and request the Secretary-General to take the necessary measures to ensure the full implementation of the relevant paragraph in the resolutions.  [Those paragraphs concern a demand that Israel shall pay the amount of some $1.12 million resulting from a shooting incident at Qana on 18 April 1996.]


By other terms of the text, the Assembly would take note of the status of contributions to the Force at 30 April, including outstanding contributions of $71 million, noting with concern that only 30 Member States had paid their contributions in full.  The Assembly would note with great concern the reported fuel and rations fraud and request the Secretary-General to take all necessary action to ensure that the Force was administered with a maximum of efficiency and economy.


The Assembly first adopted preambular paragraph 4 and operative paragraphs 4, 5 and 17 by a recorded vote of 99 in favour to 6 against (Australia, Canada, Israel, Palau, Papua New Guinea, United States), with 49 abstentions.  (See Annex I.)


The Assembly then adopted the text as a whole by a vote of 150 in favour to 3 against ( Israel, Palau, United States), with 1 abstention ( Australia). (See Annex II.)


Next up was a draft resolution on the financing of the United Nations Mission in Sierra Leone (UNAMSIL) (document A/60/926), by the terms of which the Assembly, taking note of the Secretary-General’s report on the Mission’s financial performance for the period from 1 July 2004 to 30 June 2005, decided that, for Member States that had fulfilled their financial obligations to the Mission, there shall be credited their respective share of the unspent balance in the amount of some $99.3 million in respect of the financial period ending 30 June 2005.  For Member States that had not fulfilled their financial obligations to the Mission, their share of the unspent balance should be set out against their outstanding obligations.  It further decided that the decrease of $1.34 million in the estimated staff assessment income in respect of the financial period ending 30 June 2005 shall be set off against the credits from the amount of $99.3 million.


Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted the text.


The Assembly then took up a draft resolution on the financing of the United Nations Mission in the Sudan (UNMIS) (document A/60/562/Add.1), by which it took note of the status of contributions to UNMIS as of 30 March 2006, including the contributions outstanding in the amount of $52.9 million, representing some 4 per cent of the total assessed contributions, and noted with concern that only 60 Member States had paid their contributions in full.


By other terms, the Assembly welcomed the use of the installation in Entebbe, Uganda, to enhance the responsiveness of its logistical support operations for peacekeeping missions in the region.  The Assembly decided to establish a Planning Officer post (at the P-4 level) in the Strategic Planning Unit.  It requested the Secretary-General to enhance coordination and provision of technical advice and operational demining in support of the Mission’s full deployment.  Noting the considerable reliance on air assets for transportation, it requested the Secretary-General to ensure that the Mission use and, where possible, increase the available road, rail and inland waterway transport modes where they were reliable, cost-effective and safer than air transportation.


Also according to the text, the Assembly decided to approve the resources requested for quick impact projects in section IV of the proposed budget for the Mission for the period from 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2007 and request the Secretary-General to ensure the fullest implementation of the quick-impact projects in 2006-2007 in light of the Mission’s capacity to undertake these activities.


Taking note of the Secretary-General’s report on the Mission’s financial performance for the period from 1 July 2004 to 30 June 2005, the Assembly decided to appropriate for the Special Account for UNMIS the amount of $1.13 billion for the period from 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2007.


The Assembly adopted the draft resolution, acting without a vote.


The Assembly then adopted, also without a vote, a draft resolution on the financing of the United Nations Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara (MINURSO) (document A/60/927).  By its terms, the Assembly decided to appropriate to the Special Account for MINURSO the amount of $44.46 million for the period from 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2007.


Spending Cap


The Assembly next took up a draft decision on expenditure authorization for the biennium 2006-2007 (document A/60/608/Add.3), by which it would decide to authorize expenditure of the remaining funds appropriated in Assembly resolution 60/247 A.


In explanation of position before the vote, the representative of Japan said he had disassociated himself from consensus two days ago in the Fifth Committee and had expressed his hope that progress would be made on management reform, mandate review and other issues.  Over the past two days, intensive efforts had been made to find solutions.


He regretted that, on the issue of management reform, no consensus was possible.  He had put forward a modest suggestion on the matter of limited budgetary discretion for the Secretary-General.  That proposal had been well received.  He hoped it would be a useful basis for further consensus.  Also on the issue of mandate review, he regretted that consensus had eluded the Committee, although progress had been made.


It was with great regret that his delegation could not change its position and, therefore, would disassociate itself from consensus, he said.  Japan was proud of fulfilling its financial obligations to the United Nations on time, in full and without conditions.  Causing financial crisis had never been the aim of the spending cap.  The cap was intended as concrete evidence for Member States of their intention to realize reform.  He was, therefore, determined to continue to work constructively to achieve results on mandate review in the coming weeks.


The representative of Australia said his delegation disassociated himself from consensus.  The cap as adopted in December had demonstrated a commitment to reform and the conviction that reform should be achieved as soon as possible.  Lifting the cap without reform would be to defeat the purpose of the cap.  Reforms had not been achieved on management and oversight, and mandate review had also not been achieved.  That was a serious failure of Member States.  Review was just a sensible practice.  The need to implement best management practices should also be beyond debate and should not take months.


The representative of the United States said his delegation had in the Fifth Committee disassociated itself from consensus and would do so again tonight.  He thanked Alan Rock of Canada for his tireless service to the Assembly and wished him well.


Canada’s representative said the breadth and depth of his country’s commitment to the Organization was well known.  Canada was one of the few countries that had paid its dues in full and on time –- a concrete expression of its commitment to the United Nations reliable financing.  Canada had not disassociated from the consensus on the draft resolution in the Fifth Committee in the expectation that progress would have been achieved, including on management reform and mandate review.  His delegation had worked hard to bring that about.  Sadly, however, what had transpired could not be seen as a serious effort to advance reform or find common ground.

He said the United Nations could not continue to be effective unless it modernized its work programme through mandate review and its method of work through management reform.  Management structures must be suited to the times.  The Organization could not confront new problems with antiquated structures.  He was deeply distressed that the Assembly had not seized the moment and had failed to modernize the Organization.  That failure undermined the Organization’s credibility and, ultimately, support among the Governments of the world.  That was a decision with which Canada could not associate itself.  Canada would dedicate itself to the achievement of management reform and mandate review in the weeks and months ahead.


The Assembly then adopted the draft decision.


Other Texts


The Assembly then adopted the draft resolution contained in document A/60/608/Add.4 on estimates in respect of special political missions, good offices and other political initiatives authorized by the General Assembly and/or Security Council.


By the terms of the text, the Assembly approved the budget for United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) of $59.65 million gross ($54.74 million net) for the period of 1 April-31 December 2006, the budget for the International Independent Investigation Commission (IIIC) of $18.97 million gross ($17.02 million net) for the period from 16 June through 31 December 2006, and the budget for United Nations Office in Timor-Leste (UNOTIL) of $5.78 million gross ($5.25 million net).


Taking note of the unencumbered balance in the amounts already appropriated for the three missions totalling $6.04 million, the Assembly approved a charge of $51.91 million, corresponding to the unassigned balance in the provision for special political missions appropriated under section 3, Political Affairs, of the 2006-2007 programme budget, and to appropriate, under the procedures provided for in resolution 41/213 of 19 December 1986, an amount of $19.07 million under section 3, Political Affairs, and $7.38 million under section 35, Staff assessment, to be offset by a corresponding amount under income section 1, Income from Staff Assessment, of the 2006-2007 programme budget.


The Assembly then adopted the draft resolution contained in document A/60/608/Add.5 on additional office accommodation for the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights.


By the terms of the draft decision, the Assembly authorized the Secretary-General to enter into commitments of up to $4.98 million under the 2006-2007 programme budget for additional office accommodation in Geneva of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights.  That amount would comprise $2.19 million under section 28E, Administration, Geneva, $1.59 million under section 32, Construction, Alteration, Improvement and Major Maintenance, $1.19 under section 33 Safety and security, and $232,000 under section 35, Staff Assessment, to be offset by an equal amount under income section 1, Income from Staff Assessment.


The Assembly, by the decision, also welcomed with appreciation the intention of the host Government to contribute financial resources towards meeting the initial rental obligations, as well as the cost of exterior perimeter security protection.


Finally, the Assembly adopted, without a vote, the draft resolution on the Capital Master Plan (document A/60/608/Add.6).


According to the text, the Assembly, reiterating its serious concern at the hazards, risks and deficiencies of the current conditions of the United Nations Headquarters building that endanger the safety, health and well-being of staff, visitors, tourists and delegations, including high-level delegations, took note of several Secretary-General reports on the issue and decided to revert to the consideration of the reports at the main part of its sixty-first session.


The Assembly also requested the Secretary-General to ensure that no action is taken that would preclude any decision that the Assembly might take on the construction of a new permanent building on the North Lawn at some future date.  The Assembly requested that a comprehensive study on the feasibility of the proposed construction on the North Lawn be made.


Speaking in explanation of position, Finland’s representative, on behalf of the European Union, said the constructive spirit that had come to the fore during negotiations encouraged the Union.  Member States had demonstrated that tangible progress could be achieved when they worked together.  The lifting of the cap was important as it was in the shared interest of all that the Organization continued to deliver services around the world.


She noted that, in his letter of 28 June, the President of the Assembly had outlined the remarkable progress achieved so far.  Much had been achieved in a little over six months.  Today, the Assembly had adopted a resolution on development follow-up, reflecting a spirit of global partnership.  However, agreement had not been reached on mandate review or management reform, and efforts must be redoubled to reach consensus next week.  Reform was an ongoing process and much remained to be done.  The Union would work hard with all partners with a view to achieving a successful conclusion.  She appealed to all delegations to enhance global partnership to take decisions on substance and process necessary to make the Organization more efficient and effective.  It was crucial to achieve meaningful results by 7 July.


Concluding Remarks


Mr. ELIASSON ( Sweden), President of the General Assembly, said that, during the last few weeks, there had been intensive work on management reform, as well as on mandate review.  By those efforts, the process had begun to create the necessary conditions for a more efficient, effective and accountable United Nations.  The sixtieth session could already look back on a number of significant accomplishments.


He said that, over the last few days, the Fifth Committee had focused on various issues regarding reform.  In those negotiations -- where work must still be continued, he stressed -– some areas of possible agreement had emerged, including agreement on establishing the post of Chief Information Technology Officer; support for adoption of the International Public Sector Accounting Standards; and support for the intention of the Secretary-General to submit a single, comprehensive annual report.  Consultations were being pursued on the idea of providing the Secretary-General with limited discretion in budgetary implementation.


While the Fifth committee had been working on those issues, it had also had had to deal with peacekeeping budgets.  Nearly 20 resolutions, amounting to almost $5 billion, had been negotiated.  In that situation, it was understandable that more time might be needed to finalize negotiations.   The Committee had, thus, decided to extend its resumed session until 7 July.


He said another important aspect of the reform efforts was the mandate review.  In parallel to the work of the Assembly, processes of mandate review were going on in the Security Council and the Economic and Social Council.  He understood that there was support for the idea that, as soon as the review of the mandates that were five years and older, which had not been renewed, had been concluded, consideration should be given to entering a second phase of discussion on the remaining mandates.  He also understood that further consultations would be needed on the guiding principles for the second phase.  He would, therefore, convene informal consultations in the month of July.


In conclusion, he expressed his satisfaction that the Assembly, by consensus, had authorized the expenditure of the remaining funds appropriated in resolution 60/247 A.  By that decision, the United Nations was now in a position to fully implement its programme of work during the remainder of the biennium 2006-2007, and deliver its services to peoples and crises areas all over the world.  In order to do that effectively, the work to reform, streamline and modernize the United Nations must be pursued with vigour and a sense of shared responsibility.


The Assembly then decided to extend the work of the Fifth Committee for the period from 5 to 7 July.


ANNEX I


Vote on Financing of UNIFIL


Preambular paragraph 4 and operative paragraphs 4, 5 and 17 of the draft resolution on the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) (document A/60/928) was adopted by a recorded vote of 99 in favour to 6 against, with 49 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Fiji, Gambia, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Australia, Canada, Israel, Palau, Papua New Guinea, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uruguay.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Bahamas, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Honduras, Kiribati, Liberia, Malawi, Marshall Islands, Montenegro, Nauru, Nicaragua, Republic of Moldova, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.


ANNEX II


Vote on Financing of UNIFIL


The draft resolution on the financing of the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) (document A/60/928) was adopted by a recorded vote of 150 in favour to 3 against, with 1 abstention, as follows:


In favour:  Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Australia.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Bahamas, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Guinea-Bissau, Honduras, Iran, Kiribati, Liberia, Marshall Islands, Montenegro, Nauru, Nicaragua, Republic of Moldova, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.


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For information media • not an official record