9/11/2005
Security Council
SC/8552

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Security Council

5302nd Meeting (PM)


Security Council condemns assassination attempt against Somali prime minister,


says any use of force during transition unacceptable


Presidential Statement Expresses Disappointment Contention

Between Transitional Institutions Not Eased, Federal Parliament Not Functioning


The Security Council today condemned in the strongest terms the assassination attempt on 6 November against Somalia’s Prime Minister Ali Mohammed Gedi in Mogadishu, Somalia and the killing on 3 October of a United Nations national security officer in Kismayo.


The Council, in a statement read out by its President, Andrey I. Denisov ( Russian Federation), expressed concern over recent reported military activities and hostile rhetoric and emphasized that any resort to military force as a means for dealing with the current differences within the transitional federal institutions was unacceptable.


Concerned and disappointed over the lack of progress in ameliorating the contention between the transitional federal institutions and over the non-functioning of the Transitional Federal Parliament, which had an essential role in promoting the peace process, the Council called upon all Somali parties and the leaders of the transitional federal institutions to take concrete steps towards reaching a consensus agreement through inclusive dialogue without delay.


Further to the text, the Council condemned the increased inflow of weapons into Somalia and the continuous violations of the United Nations arms embargo.  It further reminded all States of their obligations to comply fully with the measures imposed by resolution 733 (1992), by which the Council first imposed the arms embargo, and urged them to take all the necessary steps to hold violators accountable.


In addition, the Council expressed its growing concern over the situation of 1 million Somalis in a state of humanitarian emergency or suffering from severe livelihood distress and the rising civil and food insecurity in parts of southern Somalia, where malnutrition levels had increased.  It stressed that improving humanitarian access to all Somalis in need was an essential component of durable peace and reconciliation.


The meeting began at 12:13 p.m. and adjourned at 12:26 p.m.


Presidential Statement


The statement, to be issued as document S/PRST/2005/54, reads as follows:


“The Security Council reaffirms all its previous statements and resolutions concerning the situation in Somalia, in particular the statement by its President (S/PRST/2005/32) of 14 July 2005 and resolution 1630 of 14 October 2005.


“The Security Council welcomes the report of the Secretary-General of 11 October 2005 (S/2005/642), and reaffirms its commitment to a comprehensive and lasting settlement of the situation in Somalia and its respect for the sovereignty, territorial integrity, political independence and unity of Somalia, consistent with the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations.


“The Security Council expresses its concern over recent reported military activities and hostile rhetoric, and emphasizes that any resort to military force as a means for dealing with the current difference within the transitional federal institutions is unacceptable.  The Council condemns in the strongest terms the assassination attempt on 6 November 2005 against Prime Minister Ali Mohammed Gedi in Mogadishu.


“The Security Council expresses its concern and disappointment over the lack of progress in ameliorating the contention between the leaders of the transitional federal institutions, and over the non-functioning of the Transitional Federal Parliament, which has an essential role in promoting the peace process.  The Council calls upon all Somali parties and the leaders of the transitional federal institutions to take concrete steps towards reaching a consensus agreement through inclusive dialogue without delay.  The Council commends the Prime Minister’s initiative for the early convening of a full Council of Ministers in Mogadishu, to be followed by a full session of Parliament.  The Council underlines that primary responsibility for progress in restoring an effective functioning government to Somalia lies with the leaders and members of the transitional federal institutions.


“The Security Council underlines its strong support for the Special Representative of the Secretary-General in his efforts at facilitating the peace process in Somalia, supporting ongoing Somali-owned internal initiatives.  The Council calls upon all Member States to provide their full and active support in this regard.


“The Security Council commends the neighbouring countries, Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), African Union, the League of Arab States, European Union and concerned Member States for their keen interest and persistent efforts in support of the peace process in Somalia.  The Council urges them to use their influence and leverage through a common approach to ensure that the transitional federal institutions resolve their differences and build trust, through an inclusive dialogue, and to move ahead on the key issues of security and national reconciliation.


“The Security Council affirms its continuing support to the transitional federal institutions and reiterates the need for a national security and stabilization plan to be agreed, through which any efforts to rebuild the security sector should be directed.


“The Security Council condemns the increased inflow of weapons into Somalia and the continuous violations of the United Nations arms embargo.  The Council further reminds all States of their obligations to comply fully with the measures. imposed by resolution 733 and urges them to take all necessary steps to hold violators accountable.


“The Security Council expresses serious concern over the increasing incidents of piracy off the coast of Somalia.  The Council condemns recent hijackings of vessels in the area, particularly of ships carrying humanitarian supplies to Somalia.  The Council urges the transitional federal institutions, regional actors and relevant international organizations to work together to address this problem.


“The Security Council expresses its growing concern over the situation of 1 million Somalis in a state of humanitarian emergency or suffering from severe livelihood distress and the rising civil and food insecurity in parts of southern Somalia, where malnutrition levels have increased.  The Council stresses that improving humanitarian access to all Somalis in need is an essential component of durable peace and reconciliation.


“The Security Council recognizes the role of civil society, in particular women’s groups, and their contribution to progress on demobilizing militias and improving the humanitarian situation in Somalia.


“The Security Council strongly urges the transitional federal institutions to ensure humanitarian access and provide guarantees for the safety and security of aid workers.  The Council condemns in the strongest terms the killing of a United Nations national security officer on 3 October in Kismayo.  The Council calls for those responsible to be held accountable.


“The Security Council reaffirms its full support for the peace process in Somalia and the commitment of the United Nations to assist in this regard.”


Background


The Council had before it a report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Somalia (document S/2005/642), which focuses on efforts by the international community and the Secretary-General’s Special Representative to foster inclusive dialogue among the leaders of the Somali transitional federal institutions.  It also provides an update on the security situation and the humanitarian and development activities of United Nations programmes and agencies in Somalia.


The report notes that, while some progress has been made in the peace process in Somalia, the peace process remains fragile, and much remains to be done in overcoming the current political impasse through dialogue.  The effective functioning of the transitional federal institutions is urgent.  It is unfortunate that, one year after the conclusion of the Somalia National Reconciliation Conference, the leaders of those institutions are still assuming rigid positions, even against entering into a dialogue, instead of tackling the more pressing issues of a national security plan, reconciliation and improvement of the quality of life of the Somali people.


Unless the differences within the transitional federal institutions are addressed, the report states, the current political impasse could grow into deeper divisions and undermine the very institutions that the Somali people ardently desire and the international community and the United Nations are willing to support.  Political tensions between the leaders of the transitional federal institutions have given rise to military preparations on their part and there are also persistent reports of increased violations of the arms embargo.  Calling on Somali leaders and countries of the region not to exacerbate political and military tensions, the Secretary-General urges the Somali leaders to enter into a comprehensive ceasefire agreement.


Outlining events that forced the relocation of international United Nations staff from Jawahar in early September, the Secretary-General states that the Somali people both need and want the assistance of international workers.  Tangible improvement in the security situation on the ground is an essential responsibility of the Somali leaders.  Welcoming the expressed willingness of the Speaker of the Parliament to enter into dialogue under the United Nations auspices, as well as the public statements of the Prime Minister in favour of dialogue within the framework of the transitional federal institutions, he urges all Somali leaders to take the necessary steps towards reconciling their differences.


The Secretary-General also urges the Somali leaders and the international community to help build the capacity of the Somali transitional institutions, including the Transitional Federal Government, the Parliament and the judiciary.  An active and robust parliament could serve as a national forum of debate and reconciliation and is essential for the realization of a healthy democratic order in Somalia.  Likewise, the functioning of an independent judiciary is urgently needed for the restoration of law and order and the protection of human rights in Somalia.


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For information media • not an official record