15/12/2005
General Assembly
GA/EF/3139

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixtieth General Assembly

Second Committee

37th Meeting (PM)


second committee approves draft resolution stressing need for development


strategies to maximize globalization’s positive social impacts


Action on Other Texts Postponed, 3 Paragraphs Passed, Amendment Rejected

The General Assembly would stress that development strategies must be designed to minimize the negative and maximize the positive social impacts of globalization, while striving to ensure that all population groups benefited from it, according to one of eight draft resolutions that the Second Committee (Economic and Financial) approved by consensus this afternoon.


By other terms of that draft, on the role of the United Nations in promoting development in the context of globalization and interdependence, the Assembly would stress also that ensuring internal conditions for mobilizing domestic savings, sustaining adequate productive investment and increasing human capacity were critical challenges in pursuing growth, poverty eradication and sustainable development.  It would further stress the crucial tasks of enhancing the efficacy, coherence and consistency of macroeconomic policies, as well as creating an enabling domestic environment, which were vital to the mobilization of domestic resources, increasing productivity, reducing capital flight, encouraging the private sector and attracting and effectively using international investment and assistance.


Another draft resolution, on the international financial system and development, would have the Assembly underscore the importance of competitive and inclusive private and public financial markets in mobilizing and allocating savings for productive investment.  That would contribute vitally to national development, as well as to a supportive international financial architecture.  By further terms, the Assembly would stress the importance of strong domestic institutions in promoting business activities and financial stability, which could be achieved through sound macroeconomic policies, as well as those aimed at strengthening corporate, financial and banking regulations.


The Assembly would also, by other terms, stress the importance of cooperative efforts by all countries and institutions to cope with the risks of financial instability.  It would note that global economic growth and a stable international financial system could support the ability of developing countries to achieve internationally agreed development goals.  Also by the draft, it would emphasize that the effective and equitable participation of developing countries in formulating financial standards and codes was essential, and underscore the need to ensure their implementation, on a voluntary and progressive basis, in reducing vulnerability to financial crisis and contagion.


By a draft resolution relating to the Third United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries, the Assembly would decide to convene a high-level meeting, in New York from 19 to 20 September 2006, to review implementation of the Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2001-2010.  In a separate prior action, the Committee approved operative paragraph 6 of that text by a recorded 117 votes in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 45 abstentions.  (For voting details, see Annex III.)


In another separate action on the same draft resolution, the Committee rejected an attempt to amend the text by which the Assembly would have convened a preparatory meeting of experts on 4, 5 and 6 September 2006.  The amendment was rejected in a recorded vote of 45 in favour to 112 against, with 5 abstentions ( Armenia, Iceland, Israel, Japan, Norway) (Annex II).


By a recorded vote of 159 in favour to 2 against (Japan, United States), with 1 abstention (Israel), the Committee approved operative paragraph 18 of a draft resolution relating to implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification, before approving, without a vote, the text as a whole (Annex IV).


The Committee also approved, acting again without a vote, a draft resolution on protection of the global climate for present and future generations of mankind.  In a separate prior action, it approved operative paragraph 7 of that text by a recorded 158 votes in favour to 3 against ( Japan, Somalia, United States), with 2 abstentions ( Israel, Kazakhstan) (Annex I).


Acting without a vote, the Committee also approved 3 draft resolutions relating to the needs and problems of landlocked developing countries, global partnerships, and migrant remittances.


In another consensus action today, the Committee took note of the Secretary-General’s report on actions taken in organizing the activities of the International Decade for Action, “Water for Life”, 2005-2015.


The Second Committee will meet again at 3 p.m. on Friday 16 December, when it is expected to take action on outstanding drafts and conclude its session.


Background


The Second Committee (Economic and Financial) met today to take action on 13 draft resolutions relating to the international financial system, sustainable development, globalization and interdependence, migration, countries in special situations, poverty eradication, and global partnerships.


Draft Resolutions


Before the Committee was a draft on the international financial system and development (document A/C.2/60/L.67), by which the Assembly would stress the importance of cooperative efforts by all countries and institutions to cope with the risks of financial instability.  It would note that global economic growth and a stable international financial system can support the ability of developing countries to achieve internationally agreed development goals.  By further terms, it would emphasize that economic growth should be further strengthened and sustained, noting that global economic growth depends on national economic growth, and that implementation of sound macroeconomic policies could significantly contribute to a revitalization of economic growth.


Also by that text, the Assembly would underline the importance of promoting international financial stability and sustainable growth, welcoming efforts to this end by the International Monetary Fund and the Financial Stability Forum, as well as consideration by the International Monetary and Financial Committee, of ways to sharpen tools designed to promote international financial stability and enhance crisis prevention.  The Assembly would also underline the importance of national efforts to increase resilience to financial risk, stressing in this regard the importance of better assessment of a country’s debt burden and its ability to service that debt in both crisis prevention and resolution.


Further by the draft, the Assembly would underscore the importance of competitive and inclusive private and public financial markets in mobilizing and allocating savings towards productive investment, making a vital contribution to national development efforts and to an international financial architecture that is supportive of development.  By other terms, it would stress the importance of strong domestic institutions in promoting business activities and financial stability for the achievement of growth and development, including through sound macroeconomic policies and policies aimed at strengthening the regulatory systems of the corporate, financial and banking sectors, and also stress that international cooperation initiatives in those areas should encourage flows of capital to developing countries.


The Assembly would, by other terms, underline that enhancing the voice of developing countries and countries with economies in transition in the Bretton Woods institutions is of vital importance, and stress the importance of enhancing ongoing work in this regard.  By further terms, it would emphasize that it is essential to ensure the effective and equitable participation of developing countries in the formulation of financial standards and codes, and underscore the need to ensure their implementation, on a voluntary and progressive basis, as a contribution to reducing vulnerability to financial crisis and contagion.


Also by that text, the Assembly would call for continued efforts by multilateral financial institutions to provide policy advice, technical assistance and financial support to member countries; to work on the basis of nationally owned reform and development strategies; to pay due regard to the special needs and implementing capacities of developing countries and countries with economies in transition; and to minimize the negative impacts of adjustment programmes on vulnerable segments of society.  By further terms, it would stress the need to continuously improve standards of corporate and public sector governance, including accounting, auditing and measures to ensure transparency.


A draft on the protection of the global climate for present and future generations of mankind (document A/C.2/60/L.23/Rev.1) would have the Assembly call on States to work cooperatively towards achieving the ultimate objective of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.  Further by that draft, the Assembly would encourage cooperation to promote complementarities among the secretariats of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa, and the Convention on Biological Diversity.  Also by the text, the Assembly would request the Secretary-General to make provisions for the session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, and its subsidiary bodies, in his proposal for the programme budget for the biennium 2006-2007.


Also before the Committee was a draft resolution on the International Year of Deserts and Desertification, 2006 (document A/C.2/60/L.34), by which the General Assembly would reiterate its call to Member States and international organizations to support activities related to desertification, including land degradation, to be organized by affected countries, in particular African and least developed countries.


By other terms, the Assembly would also reiterate its call to countries to contribute to the Convention to Combat Desertification, and to undertake special initiatives in observance of the Year.  Further, it would call upon Member States to make voluntary contributions to the Convention’s Special Fund.  Also by the text, the Assembly would request the Executive Secretary of the Convention to Combat Desertification to make available to the Parties to the Convention and to observers a consolidated list of all activities reported, including lessons learned and best practices, in order to coordinate information and avoid overlapping of activities.


According to a draft on implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa (document A/C.2/60/L.35/Rev.1), would have the Assembly call on Governments, in collaboration with multilateral organizations -- including the Global Environment Facility implementation agencies -- to integrate desertification into their plans and strategies for sustainable development.


By further terms, the Assembly would stress the importance of implementing all decisions of the Conference of the Parties, particularly those at its seventh session on strengthening of the Committee on Science and Technology, and on the follow-up to the report of the Joint Inspection Unit, and support development of a 10-year strategy to foster implementation of the Convention.


Also by that text, the Assembly would call on Governments -- and invite multilateral financial institutions, regional development banks, regional economic integration organizations, non-governmental organizations and the private sector -- to contribute generously to the Supplementary Fund and the Special Fund in accordance with the financial rules of the Conference of the Parties.


A draft on the role of the United Nations in promoting development in the context of globalization and interdependence (document A/C.2/60/L.71) would have the Assembly stress that, in the increasingly globalizing interdependent world economy, a holistic approach to the interconnected national, international and systemic challenges of financing for development is essential, and that such an approach must open up opportunities for all and help to ensure that resources are created and used effectively, and that solid and accountable institutions are established at all levels.  Further, it would stress that development strategies have to be formulated with a view to minimizing the negative social impact of globalization and maximizing the positive impact, while striving to ensure that all groups of the population benefit from it, and that at the international level, efforts should focus on the means to achieve the internationally agreed development goals.


Also by the text, the Assembly would stress further that in the common pursuit of growth, poverty eradication and sustainable development, a critical challenge is to ensure the necessary internal conditions for mobilizing domestic savings, both public and private, sustaining adequate levels of productive investment and increasing human capacity.  A crucial task is to enhance the efficacy, coherence and consistency of macroeconomic policies and an enabling domestic environment, which is vital for mobilizing domestic resources, increasing productivity, reducing capital flight, encouraging the private sector and attracting and making effective use of international investment and assistance.


By other terms, the Assembly would underline that the increasing interdependence of national economies in a globalizing world and the emergence of rule-based regimes for international economic relations have meant that the space for national economic policy, especially in the areas of trade, investment and industrial development, is now often framed by international disciplines, commitments and global market considerations.  It is for each Government to evaluate the trade-off between the benefits of accepting international rules and commitments and the constraints posed by the loss of policy space, and that it is particularly important for developing countries that all countries take into account the need for appropriate balance between national policy space and international disciplines and commitments.


The Assembly would, by other terms, underline also that in addressing the linkages between globalization and sustainable development, particular focus should be placed on identifying and implementing mutually reinforcing policies and practices that promote sustained economic growth, social development and environment protection.  It would underline further that the issue of enhancing the voice of developing countries and countries with economies in transition in the Bretton Woods institutions is of vital importance, and stress the importance of advancing ongoing work in this regard.


Also by the text, the Assembly would stress the importance of building a people-centred and inclusive information society, so as to enhance digital opportunities for all people in order to help bridge the digital divide, putting the potential of information and communication technologies at the service of development and addressing new challenges of the information society.  In this regard it would call for the implementation of the outcomes of the World Summit on the Information Society.


Further by the draft, the Assembly would stress the importance of migration as a phenomenon accompanying increased globalization, including its impact on economies.  It would underline further the need for greater coordination and cooperation among countries, as well as relevant regional and international organizations.  By other terms, the Assembly would emphasize the importance of recognizing and addressing the specific concerns of countries with economies in transition so as to help them to benefit from globalization, with a view to their full integration into the world economy.


A draft on facilitation and reduction of the cost of transfer of migrant remittances (document A/C.2/60/L.15/Rev.1) would have the Assembly encourage Governments and other stakeholders to consider adopting measures, in accordance with national legislation, that facilitate migrant remittance flows to recipient countries, including through simplifying procedures and facilitating access to formal means of remittances transfers; and promoting access to, and awareness on the availability and use of, financial services for migrants.  Further by the text, it would look forward to the High-level Dialogue of the General Assembly on International Migration and Development, to be held in 2006, which will offer an opportunity to discuss the multidimensional aspects of international migration and development in order to identify ways to maximize their development benefits and minimize their negative impacts.


The Committee also had before it a text on the Third United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries:  high-level meeting on the midterm comprehensive global review of the implementation of the Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2001-2010 (document A/C.2/60/L.32/Rev.1).  By its terms, the Assembly would stress that progress in implementing the Programme of Action will require effective implementation of national policies and priorities for the economic growth and sustainable development of least developed countries, as well as strong and committed partnership between those countries and their development partners.


Also by that draft, the Assembly would decide to convene a high-level meeting on the comprehensive global review of the implementation of the Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2001-2010 in New York from 19 to 20 September 2006, to be chaired by the President of the General Assembly.  It would decide also to convene a three-day preparatory meeting of experts during its sixtieth session, preferably on 4 to 6 September, for the review in order to propose measures to advance implementation of the Programme of Action.


The Assembly would, by other terms, stress that the global review should assess progress made in implementing commitments, and provide the occasion to reaffirm goals and objectives agreed upon at the Third United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries; share best practices and lesson learned; and identify obstacles and constraints, actions and initiatives to overcome them, and important measures for further implementing the Brussels Programme of Action, as well as new challenges and emerging issues.


By further terms, the Assembly would emphasize that the comprehensive global review is of particular significance, as it will provide an opportunity for the international community, in particular, the least developed countries and their development partners, to discuss implementation of the Brussels Programme of Action so as to ensure the timely, effective and full implementation of the Programme of Action during the remainder of the decade.  Further by the text, the Assembly would emphasize the importance of country-level preparations as a critical input to the preparatory process for the comprehensive global review and to the implementation of and follow-up to its outcome.  It would also call on least developed countries to undertake national reviews on implementing the Programme of Action, with a particular focus on progress, obstacles, constraints, actions, and measures necessary to further its implementation.


Also by the draft, the Assembly would stress that adequate resources should be provided for full participation of least developed countries in the comprehensive review at the national, regional and global levels, and request the Secretary-General to mobilize extrabudgetary resources to cover the cost of participation of two Government representatives from each least developed country in the high-level meeting on the comprehensive global review.


A draft on the Third United Nations Conference of the Least Developed Countries:  high-level meeting on the midterm comprehensive global review of the implementation of the Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2001-2010 (document A/C.2/60/L.69) amends the operative paragraph by which the Assembly would convene a preparatory meeting of experts on 4, 5 and
6 September 2006 in order to propose measures to advance the implementation of the Programme of Action.  By the new text, the Assembly would invite Member States to consider adopting a short declaration aimed at reaffirming and expressing recommitment to the Brussels Programme of Action.


Another draft, on specific actions related to the particular needs and problems of landlocked developing countries:  outcome of the International Ministerial Conference of Landlocked and Transit Developing Countries and Donor Countries and International Financial and Development Institutions on Transit Transport Cooperation (document A/C.2/60/L.68), would have the Assembly emphasize that assistance for the improvement of transit transport facilities and services should be integrated into the overall economic development strategies of the landlocked and transit developing countries and that donor countries should consequently take into account the requirements for the long-term restructuring of the economies of landlocked developing countries.


The Assembly would, by other terms, stress the need for the implementation of the São Paulo Consensus, adopted at the eleventh session of the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) held in São Paulo, Brazil, from 13 to 18 June 2004, in particular paragraphs 66 and 84, by the relevant international organizations and donors in a multi-stakeholder approach.


Further by the text, the Assembly would request the United Nations system, particularly the Office of the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States, and regional commissions, to continue their efforts to establish effective indicators to measure progress in implementing the Almaty Programme.


By a draft entitled towards global partnerships (document A/C.2/60/L.38/Rev.1), the Assembly would recall that the 2005 World Summit resolved to enhance the contribution of non-governmental organizations, civil society, the private sector and other stakeholders in national development efforts.  Further by the text, it would encourage the United Nations system to develop a common and systemic approach, which places greater emphasis on impact, transparency, accountability and sustainability, while striving for balanced representation of relevant partners from developed and developing countries and countries with economies in transition.


Also by that text, the Assembly would request the Secretary-General to enhance partnership management through adequate training at all levels; institutional capacity in country offices; strategic focus and local ownership; the sharing of best practices; and the improvement of partner selection processes.  Further, it would request the Secretary-General, in consultation with Member States, to promote impact-assessment mechanisms, taking into account the best tools available.


Action on Draft Resolutions


The Committee first took up the draft on the international financial system and development (document A/C.2/60/L.67), approving it without a vote.


Speaking after that action, the representative of the United Kingdom, on behalf of the European Union and associated countries, said that net outflows from developing countries -- as mentioned in operative paragraph 5 -- indicated, in a great number of cases, the successful integration of those countriesinto the global economy, including their ability to pay off debts.  Such positive effects had been highlighted in previous resolutions.


He also said that risk-rating mechanisms, as mentioned in operative paragraph 13, were important in helping to increase transparency and competition, and could function as yardsticks for investment decisions.  Development institutions should be encouraged to continue their work in that context.


The representative of the United States associated itself with the European Union on the topic of risk rating mechanisms, as well as that of net outflow of financial resources.  On the one hand, net outflows could reflect a successful export strategy, or, on the other, the outward flight of investments, payment of debt servicing, or the accumulation of foreign reserves taken in national interests.  Indeed, investors often studied such outward flows when making investment decisions.  It was misleading to draw attention to net outflow of financial resources in a negative way, and a way of criticizing the pro-growth policies promoted by the United States.


The representative of Jamaica, speaking on behalf of the “Group of 77” and China, reacted to the comments by the European Union and the United States by saying that developing countries had been experiencing net outflow of financial resources for the eighth consecutive year.  While such effects could be a positive indicator in some specific cases, it was, nevertheless, important to request the Secretary-General to continue collaborating with financial institutions to analyze the reasons for that phenomenon, as mentioned in operative paragraph 5.


The Committee then withdrew an earlier version of the text (document A/C.2/60/L.2).


Next, the Committee took note of the report of the Secretary-General on actions taken in organizing the activities of the International Decade for Action, “Water for Life”, 2005-2015, as contained in document A/60/158.  That action was taken without a vote.


The Committee then took up a draft on the protection of the global climate for present and future generations of mankind (document A/C.2/60/L.23/Rev.1), deciding to hold a vote on operative paragraph 7 of that text.


The representative of the United States said he would vote “no” on the draft and expressed disappointment over the continual use of resources from the regular United Nations budget for treaty bodies, which should collect funds from their memberships.


The representative of Japan said he would vote against the draft since the Convention had its own budget and secretariat, and not all States were parties to it.  The costs for its meetings should be separate from the regular budget.


The Committee then approved operative paragraph 7 of that draft, by a recorded vote of 158 in favour to 3 against ( Japan, Somalia, United States), with 2 abstentions ( Israel, Kazakhstan).  (See Annex I.)


The representative of the United Kingdom, speaking on behalf of the European Union, said she was disappointed that important decisions on climate change that had been made at the highest level were not reflected in the resolution.  However, the European Union was satisfied with important outcomes of the most recent meetings of the States parties to the Convention on Climate Change, as well as its Kyoto Protocol.


The representative of Somalia said he wished to correct a mistake he had made by voting “no” instead of “yes” on the draft.


The Committee then took up the draft as a whole, approving it as orally corrected.


The representative of the United States said the implied reference in preambular paragraph 10 to the Kyoto Protocol was historical and had been overtaken by changed policies and circumstances.


The Committee then approved, without a vote and as orally corrected, the draft on the role of the United Nations in promoting development in the context of globalization and interdependence (document A/C.2/60/L.71),withdrawing an earlier version (document A/C.2/60/L.12).


In an explanation of position, the representative of the United States said her delegation understood “right to development” to mean that each individual should enjoy the right to development of his or her intellectual or other capabilities to the maximum extent possible through the exercise of a full range of civil and political rights.


The representative of the United Kingdom, speaking on behalf of the European Union, said her delegation was committed to internal and external policies that sought to minimize the cost of globalization for all.  The European Union welcomed the efforts of corporate social responsibility initiatives to promote fair play, which underlined the relationship between business and pro-poor growth.  The European Union was currently taking initiatives to enhance private-sector development.


The representative of Canada said her delegation recognized the dual nature of cultural goods and services as having both economic and social value, as well as the link between culture and development.  The Convention on the Protection and Promotion of Cultural Diversity played a key role in preserving cultures so that they could be transmitted to future generations, and Canada regretted that there was no explicit reference to the Convention in the draft resolution.


Following those remarks, the Committee approved, without a vote, the draft on facilitation and reduction of the cost of transfer of migrant remittances (document A/C.2/60/L.15/Rev.1).


The representative of the United States said his delegation joined the consensus, but noted that the text fell short in calling for greater transparency to help halt the transfer of illegal funds, such as those used to fund terrorism, and in calling for more competition to improve services and lower transmission costs.


The representative of the United Kingdom, speaking on behalf of the European Union, said it was important to reduce the cost of remittances and to create opportunities for investments for the benefit of development.  Indeed, reports by the World Bank and the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs provided evidence of the development dimensions of remittances, and underlined the need to further develop measures to reduce costs through competition, as well as to strengthen data collection.  Those would be addressed during the next session of the General Assembly.


The representative of Argentina then spoke to make corrections to the Spanish text.


The representative of Canada aligned herself with the explanation of position by the European Union.


The Committee then postponed action on the draft on international migration and development (document A/C.2/60/L.62) until the next meeting.


It then took up the draft on the Third United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries:  high-level meeting on the midterm comprehensive global review of the implementation of the Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2001-2010 (document A/C.2/60/L.32/Rev.1) and an amendment to that text (document A/C.2/60/L.69) introduced by the representative of the United Kingdom on behalf of the European Union.


The representative of Jamaica, speaking on behalf of the Group of 77 and China, said the draft resolution had been extensively negotiated the group was unable to accept any further amendments to the text.


The Committee then decided to vote on the amendment.


The representative of the United States said he would vote “no” on the amendment because it failed to address budgetary implications.

The Committee then rejected the amendment by a recorded vote of 45 in favour to 112 against, with 5 abstentions ( Armenia, Iceland, Israel, Japan, Norway).  (See Annex II.)


The representative of Norway said she had abstained because her delegation supported the Group of 77’s original paragraph 6, which the amendment would replace.


The representative of the United States asked for a vote on operative paragraph 6, stating that he would vote against it.  Least developed countries were more confronted by poverty and obstacles to developmental goals than any others, but the global review had budgetary implications of nearly $800,000.  That amount would not go to poverty eradication and could have been substantially reduced.


The Committee then approved operative paragraph 6 in a recorded vote of
117 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 45 abstentions.  (See Annex III.)


The representative of the United Kingdom, speaking on behalf of the European Union, said she had abstained due to the ambiguity of paragraph 6, which failed to outline clearly the objectives of the review.


The Committee then addressed the text as a whole, approving it without a vote.


The representative of the United States said his delegation had shown great flexibility in negotiations on the draft resolution and expressed regret that the Group of 77 and least developed countries had not, creating the unfortunate precedent of breaking consensus on least developed countries.  The review had heavy budgetary implications that would be wasteful and unnecessary.


The representative of Japan said he had joined consensus because his country’s partnership with least developed countries was of principal importance.  However, the additional costs incurred through paragraphs 5 and 6 could undermine the credibility of the United Nations, which was currently engaged in budgetary reform.


The representative of Benin stressed the importance of all contributions to the better implementation of the Programme of Action.


The representative of Jamaica, speaking on behalf of the Group of 77 and China, expressed regret that a vote was needed on implementation of the Brussels Programme of Action.  The Group also resented a comment that it had been high-handed in negotiations, and wished that objection to be placed on the record.


The Committee then approved, without a vote and as orally corrected, the draft on specific actions related to the particular needs and problems of landlocked developing countries:  outcome of the International Ministerial Conference of Landlocked and Transit Developing Countries and Donor Countries and International Financial and Development Institutions on Transit Transport Cooperation (document A/C.2/60/L.68).  It withdrew an earlier draft (document A/C.2/60/L.33).


Turning to the next agenda item, “Towards global partnerships” (document A/C.2/60/L.38/Rev.1), the Committee approved the related draft, without a vote, as orally corrected.


Speaking after that action, the representative of the United States said his delegation supported greater use of private-public partnerships by the United Nations system in carrying out its activities because of the wealth of expertise that non-governmental organizations and civil society could bring to the table.  The United States delegation understood that any reference to partnership referred to partnerships between the United Nations and all relevant partners.


He also said that while the United States applauded and supported good corporate citizenship, it must be placed in its proper context.  Corporations had a contractual responsibility towards their owners, creditors and customers to produce goods and services in markets.  The protection of human rights, for example, was a responsibility of Governments and must not be shifted to the private sector under the guise of corporate responsibility.


The representative of Jamaica then expressed his regret that no agreement had been reached on the issue of corporate social responsibility.


Taking up the draft on the implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (document A/C.2/60/L.35/Rev.1), the Committee decided to hold a vote on operative paragraph 18 of the text.


In an explanation of vote, the representative of the United States said he would vote against the operative paragraph, expressing disappointment at the diversion of resources to subsidize independent treaty bodies, which should rightfully collect funds from their membership.  However, the United States supported the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification and would do so through voluntary contributions.


The representative of Japan said his delegation would vote against operative paragraph 18 because the Convention was an independent body with its own budget and secretariat and not all Member States were party to it.  The cost of services should be separated from the regular budget, unless those services were sub-contracted to other parties.


The Committee then approved operative paragraph 18 by a recorded vote of 159 in favour to 2 against ( Japan, United States), with 1 abstention ( Israel) (annex IV).


The Committee then approved the draft as a whole without a vote.


The representative of the United States said his delegation was committed to the Convention, but any contributions from Governments should be made strictly on a voluntary basis.


(annexes follow)


ANNEX I


Vote on Operative Paragraph 7


Operative paragraph 7 of the draft resolution on protection of the global climate for present and future generations of mankind (document A/C.2/60/L.23/Rev.1) was approved by a recorded vote of 158 in favour to 3 against, with 2 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Japan, Somalia, United States.


Abstain:  Israel, Kazakhstan.


Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gabon, Gambia, Iraq, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Marshall Islands, Mozambique, Nauru, Niger, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Togo, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.


(END OF ANNEX I)


ANNEX II


Vote On Amendment to Draft on Third United Nations Conference on Least Developed Countries


The amendment to the draft resolution on the Third United Nations Conference on the least developed countries:  high-level meeting on the midterm comprehensive global review of the Programme of Action for the least developed countries for the decade 2001-2010 (document A/C.2/60/L.69) was rejected by a recorded vote of 45 in favour to 112 against, with 5 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom.


Against:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Abstain:   Armenia, Iceland, Israel, Japan, Norway.


Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Costa Rica, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gabon, Gambia, Iraq, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Marshall Islands, Mozambique, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Togo, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu,


(END OF ANNEX II)


ANNEX III


Vote on Operative Paragraph 6 of Least Developed Countries Draft


Operative paragraph 6 of the draft resolution on the Third United Nations Conference on the least developed countries:  high-level meeting on the midterm comprehensive global review of the Programme of Action for the least developed countries (document A/C.2/60/L.32/Rev.1) was approved by a recorded vote of 117 in favour to 1 against, with 45 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom.


Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gabon, Gambia, Iraq, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Marshall Islands, Mozambique, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Togo, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.


(END OF ANNEX III)


ANNEX IV


Vote on Operative Paragraph 18 of Desertification Convention


Operative paragraph 18 of the draft resolution on Implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (document A/C.2/60/L.35/Rev.1) was approved by a recorded vote of 159 in favour to 2 against, with 1 abstention, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Japan, United States.


Abstain:  Israel.


Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gabon, Gambia, Iraq, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Marshall Islands, Mozambique, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.


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For information media • not an official record