09/12/2005
General Assembly
GA/EF/3137

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixtieth General Assembly

Second Committee

35th Meeting (PM)


SECOND COMMITTEE APPROVES TEXT STRESSING THAT GLOBAL TRADE TALKS SHOULD MARK


MILESTONE IN REALIZING DEVELOPMENT DIMENSION OF DOHA WORK PROGRAMME


The General Assembly would stress that the World Trade Organization (WTO) meeting in Hong Kong next week should “constitute a milestone” in realizing the development dimension of the Doha work programme by 2006, especially in enhancing market access for developing-country goods and services, according to one of five texts approved by the Second Committee (Economic and Financial) this afternoon.


Also by that draft resolution, approved by a recorded vote of 109 in favour to 1against ( United States), with 48abstentions, the need to establish trade-related intellectual property rules, and offer special and differential treatment to developing countries would also be stressed.  By other terms of the text, on international trade and development, the Assembly would stress the importance of transparent and inclusive procedures in the multilateral trading system to enable developing countries to have their interests reflected in the outcome of trade negotiations.  It would further underline that each Government must evaluate the trade-off between the benefits of accepting international rules and commitments and the constraints posed by the loss of policy space.  (See Annex II.)


In a separate prior action, the Committee voted on paragraph 13 of the text, by which the Assembly would call on developed countries to provide immediate duty-free and quota-free market access to all products from least developed countries, and on developing countries to extend duty-free and quota-free market access to all their exports.  That paragraphwasapproved by a recorded vote of 149 in favour to 4against ( Canada, Japan, Republic of Korea, United States), with 5abstentions ( Iceland, Israel, Liechtenstein, Russian Federation, Switzerland).  (See Annex I.)


The Assembly would, by additional terms, call for accelerated negotiations on the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPs) in the Doha Ministerial Declaration, to support the Convention on Biological Diversity.  It would also call for the acceleration of negotiations on trade-related aspects of intellectual property rights and public health, to address the problems resulting from HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and other epidemics afflicting many developing countries, including the least developed.  Further by the text, the Assembly would stress the need to effectively operationalize the aid-for-trade initiative, so as to address adjustment challenges facing developing countries, and to build their trade capacities, infrastructure and institutions.


By a recorded vote of 157 in favour to 1against ( United States), with no abstentions, the Committee also approved a draft decision on operational activities for development of the United Nations system.  By that text, the Assembly would take note of the Secretary-General’s reports on comprehensive statistical data on the system’s 2003 operational activities for development and on funding options and modalities for financing those operational activities.  It would also decide to request the Economic and Social Council to consider those reports in conjunction with a General Assembly resolution on evaluating the full implementation of the resolution.  (See Annex III.)


Further by that draft, the Assembly would take note of the Joint Inspection Unit report on measures to improve the overall performance of the United Nations system at the country level, the related note by the Secretary-General transmitting the comments of the United Nations System Chief Executives Board for Coordination on that report, and his note transmitting the report of the Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) on the activities of the Untied Nations Development Fund for Women.


Acting without a vote, the Committee also approved a draft on the promotion of new and renewable sources of energy, including the implementation of the World Solar Programme.  By its terms, the Assembly would call on Governments and other regional and international organizations to combine the use of renewable energy and cleaner fossil fuel technologies with the sustainable use of traditional energy resources.  Further by that text, it would encourage national and regional initiatives to promote access to energy for the poorest, and stress that a wider use of renewable energy required technology transfer and diffusion on a global scale, including through North-South and South-South cooperation.


Two additional drafts -- on the implementation of Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development, and on the Convention on Biological Diversity -- were approved without a vote.


The Second Committee will meet again at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, 13 December, to take action on further draft resolutions.


Background


The Second Committee (Economic and Financial) met to take action today on six draft resolutions relating to trade, sustainable development and training and research, as well as a draft decision on operational activities for development.


Draft Resolutions


Before the Committee was a draft resolution on international trade and development (document A/C.2/60/L.18), by which the General Assembly would call for the successful and timely conclusion of negotiations on the Doha work programme to maximize the contribution of the trading system towards raising living standards, eradicating hunger and poverty, generating employment and achieving internationally agreed development goals.  It would underscore the need to enhance market access for goods and services of export interest to developing countries, as well as for strong, special and differential treatment, balanced rules, and well-targeted sustainably financed technical assistance and capacity-building programmes for developing countries, so as to realize the development dimension in the Doha work programme.  The Assembly would also stress that the Sixth Ministerial Conference of the World Trade Organization (WTO), to be held in Hong Kong from 13 to 18 December 2005, should constitute an important milestone to that end, particularly for finalizing the negotiating modalities for successful conclusion of the Doha Round by 2006.


Also by the text, the Assembly would stress the importance of open, transparent, inclusive, democratic and more orderly processes and procedures in the multilateral trading system, to enable developing countries to have their vital interests duly reflected in the outcome of trade negotiations.  By further terms, it would stress the need for the effective operationalization of the recent aid-for-trade initiative, to address adjustment challenges, as well as to build the supply and trade capacities, infrastructure and institutions of developing countries, with sufficient and additional funding of the initiative to benefit recipient countries.


The Assembly would, by other terms, call for the acceleration of negotiations on the development-related mandate concerning the Agreement on Trade-related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights in the Doha Ministerial Declaration, in order for intellectual property rules fully to support the objectives of the Convention on Biological Diversity.  It would also call for the acceleration of trade-related aspects of intellectual property rights and public health, to address the problems afflicting many developing countries, including the least developed countries, and especially those problems resulting from HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and other epidemics.


Further by the draft, the Assembly would underline that the increasing interdependence of national economies in a globalizing world, and the emergence of rule-based regimes for international economic relations, have meant that the space for national economic policy is now often framed by international disciplines, commitments and global market considerations.  It would further underline that each Government must evaluate the trade-off between the benefits of accepting international rules and commitments and the constraints posed by the loss of policy space, and that all countries should consider the need for an appropriate balance between national policy space and international disciplines and commitments.


Also by the text, the Assembly would emphasize the importance of developing human, institutional, regulatory, research, trade policy, and development capacities and infrastructures aimed at enhanced supply-side capacity and competitiveness.  It would also emphasize the need to ensure an international environment conducive to the full and effective integration of developing countries into the international trading system.  It would urge donors to provide the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) with increased resources to deliver effective and demand-driven assistance to developing countries, as well as to enhance their contributions to the trust funds of the Integrated Framework for Trade-related Technical Assistance to Least Developed Countries and the Joint Integrated Technical Assistance Programme.


The Assembly would, by other terms, emphasize the need for further work to foster greater coherence between the multilateral trading system and the financial system, and urge UNCTAD to undertake relevant policy analysis in those areas, and operationalize such work, including through its technical assistance activities.  It would call on developed countries to provide immediate duty- and quota-free market access, and also call on developing countries in a position to do so to extend duty- and quota-free market access to the exports of least developed countries.


By another draft, on the use of spirulina to combat hunger and malnutrition and help achieve sustainable development (document A/C.2/60/L.14/Rev.1), the Assembly would call on Member States, United Nations agencies, other intergovernmental organizations, non-governmental organization and the private sector to encourage the production and use of spirulina.  It would emphasize the importance of assisting national activities to produce and use spirulina, especially in member countries of the Convention for the Use of Food Micro-Algae and the Intergovernmental Institution for the Use of Spirulina against Malnutrition.


A draft on implementation of Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development (document A/C.2/60/L.58), would have the Assembly call on Governments, the Economic and Social Council, United Nations bodies, regional commissions and specialized agencies, international financial institutions, the Global Environment Facility, other intergovernmental organizations, as well as major groups, to ensure the implementation and follow-up to commitments, programmes and time-bound targets adopted at the World Summit.


Further by that text, the Assembly would encourage Governments to participate with representatives in the fourteenth session of the Commission on Sustainable Development (CSD), from departments and organizations working in the areas of energy for sustainable development, industrial development, air/atmosphere pollution and climate change, and finance.  It would request the Commission’s secretariat to make the necessary arrangements to ensure the balanced participation of major groups from developed and developing countries in the CSD’s sessions.


By a draft on promotion of new and renewable sources of energy, including the implementation of the World Solar Programme (document A/C.2/60/L.53), the Assembly would call on Governments and other relevant stakeholders, such as regional and international organizations, to combine the increased use of new and renewable energy resources, more efficient use of energy, greater reliance on advanced energy technologies, including advanced and cleaner fossil fuel technologies, and the sustainable use of traditional energy resources.


Also by that draft, the Assembly would call on Governments to take further action to mobilize the provision of financial resources, technology transfer, capacity-building and the diffusion of environmentally sound technologies, as set out in the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation.  By other terms, it would stress that wider use of renewable energy requires technology transfer and diffusion on a global scale, including through North-South and South-South cooperation.  The Assembly would, by further terms, encourage national and regional initiatives on new and renewable energies to promote access to energy for the poorest.


A draft on the Convention on Biological Diversity (document A/C.2/60/L.55), would have the Assembly urge Member States to fulfil their commitments to significantly reduce the rate of biodiversity loss by 2010, and emphasize that this will require an appropriate focus on biodiversity loss in their policies and programmes, and the continued provision of new and additional financial and technical resources to developing countries, including through the Global Environmental Facility.


Further by the text, the Assembly would urge parties to the Convention to facilitate the transfer of technology for its implementation.  Also by the draft, it would encourage developed-country parties to the Convention to contribute to its trust funds, so as to enhance the full participation of developing countries in all its activities.  By other terms, the Assembly would stress the importance of reducing duplicative reporting requirements of the biodiversity-related conventions, while respecting their independent legal status and independent mandates.


Another draft, on the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (document A/C.2/60/L.56), would have the Assembly underline the need to further develop and expand the scope of partnerships between the Institute and other organizations and United Nations bodies, with respect to their training programmes.  By other terms, it would stress that the Institute’s courses should focus primarily on development issues and the management of international affairs.


Further by the draft, the Assembly would urge States that have interrupted their voluntary contributions to consider resuming them in view of the successful restructuring and revitalization of the Institute.  By other terms, it would stress the need for an expeditious solution of issues related to the Institute’s rent, rental rates and maintenance costs, taking into account its financial situation.  The Assembly also encouraged the Institute’s Board of Trustees to resolve its critical financial situation, particularly with a view to broadening its donor base and further increasing the contributions to the General Fund.


Also before the Committee was a draft decision on operational activities for development of the United Nations system (document A/C.2/60/L.30), by which the Assembly would take note of the Secretary-General’s reports on comprehensive statistical data on operational activities for development of the United Nations system for 2003, and on funding options and modalities for financing operational activities for development of the United Nations system.  It would decide to request the Economic and Social Council to consider the reports in conjunction with General Assembly resolution 59/250 on evaluating full implementation of that resolution.


By other terms, the Assembly would take note of the Joint Inspection Unit report on measures to improve overall performance of the United Nations system at the country level, the related note by the Secretary-General transmitting the comments of the United Nations System Chief Executives Board for Coordination on that report, and the Secretary-General’s note transmitting the report of the Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) on activities of the United Nations Development Fund for Women.


Action on Draft Resolutions


The Committee first took up the draft on international trade and development (document A/C.2/60/L.18), deciding to hold a recorded vote on operative paragraph 13, as well as the entire text


The representative of Jamaica, speaking for the “Group of 77” developing countries and China, expressed regret that the Committee could not reach consensus on such an important resolution, especially in light of the 2005 World Summit Outcome Document, which strongly reaffirmed that the United Nations had a strong role to play in international cooperation for development.  It had been hoped that the Committee could send a strong message on trade to the upcoming WTO meeting in Hong Kong.


The representative of the United Kingdom, speaking for the European Union, said the Union would vote in favour of paragraph 13, and expressed the hope that the WTO meeting would produce a result that was satisfactory to all parties.


The representative Canada said he would vote against the draft, since his country had specific concerns about the text.  The Assembly had a legitimate role to play in encouraging progress in the WTO negotiations, but it should not alter the balance of agreements that had already been reached.  Paragraph 13 went beyond commitments that WTO members had made in a ministerial declaration and in the July Framework.   Canada also opposed the paragraph’s use of the phrase “all products”.


The representative of Australia expressed support for paragraph 13, as well as hope that the issue would be resolved successfully in Hong Kong.


The representative of Norway said he would vote in favour of paragraph 13, and urged all developed countries to provide duty- and quota-free access for products from least developed countries.


The representative of Benin sought to know which delegation had asked for a vote on the draft.


Committee Vice-Chairman JURAJ KOUDELKA ( Czech Republic) said the United States had requested a vote.


The Committee then approved paragraph 13 by a recorded vote of 149 in favour to 4against ( Canada, Japan, Republic of Korea, United States), with 5abstentions ( Iceland, Israel, Liechtenstein, Russian Federation, Switzerland).  (See Annex I.)


Following that action, the representative of Benin expressed regret that a resolution so important for development must be put to a vote, especially in a Committee where the overwhelming majority supported developmental issues.  Unfortunately, statements that had been made in support of least developed countries were not always matched by deeds. 


The Committee then addressed the trade and development text as a whole.


The representative of Australia, speaking on behalf of several agricultural trading countries, said she was disappointed that consensus had not been reached on the draft.  The Doha Round was drawing to a critical point and leaders must seize the opportunity to draw the negotiations to a successful close.  Trade was vital to unlocking the full potential for development in developing countries.


Everyone knew who had been holding up progress in agricultural trade.  There had been a welcome push for increased official development assistance (ODA), and many nations had responded, but genuine commitment to development must include agreements on agricultural trade.  Solidarity could not exist while agricultural distortions continued to undermine developing-country agricultural sectors, which were vital to furthering development and poverty eradication.


The representative of the United States said his country supported certain elements of the draft, but felt that it pre-judged the outcome of negotiations taking place in Hong Kong and beyond.  It made the General Assembly a vehicle for shadow negotiations on issues that were under negotiation or review in the WTO and other specialized agencies.  Therefore, the United States would vote against the draft resolution.


The representative of the United Kingdom, speaking on behalf of the European Union, expressed regret that no consensus had been reached on the draft, which would have reaffirmed the Committee’s commitment to a balanced outcome of the Hong Kong meeting.  The Union would abstain from voting, since some paragraphs of the draft created uncertainty regarding WTO commitments.


The representative of Japan said his country would abstain from the vote, since there were aspects of the text that it had difficulty accepting.  The United Nations should send a strong message to the WTO regarding the development round, but the present resolution was not the correct medium. 


The Committee then approved the draft by a recorded vote of 109 in favour to 1against ( United States), with 48abstentions.  (See Annex II.)


Following the vote, the representative of Benin said he did not understand why many countries that talked about supporting least developed countries had voted “no”, or abstained from voting, on development issues affecting those nations.  A certain faction spoke about international trade and commerce, but actually opposed developing-country need for development.


The Committee then decided to withdraw the draft on the use of spirulina to combat hunger and malnutrition (document A/C.2/60/L.14/Rev.1).


The representative of the Dominican Republic noted that a consensus resolution on such considerations had not been reached, yet the need remained for stakeholders -- Governments, non-governmental organizations, United Nations agencies and the private sector -- to continue their work in that area.  The Dominican Republic hoped to continue receiving support to table the text at a later date.


Next, the Committee approved, without a vote and as orally corrected, the draft on implementation of Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development (document A/C.2/60/L.58), withdrawing an earlier version (document A/C.2/60/L.20).


Speaking after that action, the representative of the United States said his country supported the implementation of Agenda 21, the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development, corporate responsibility, and the promotion of micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises as a tool for achieving sustainable development.  The United States was concerned, however, that consensus could not be reached on promoting women’s participation in decision-making at all levels, mainstreaming gender perspectives, access by women to economic opportunity, land, credit, education and health care in the further implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcomes of the World Summit.  That was especially troubling in light of the fact that many of the same Governments that had agreed to include gender in the 2005 World Summit Outcome Document had opposed its inclusion in the World Summit resolution at the General Assembly.


The representative of Grenada said her delegation had wished to vote in favour of the text on international trade and development.


Acting again without a vote, the Committee then approved, as orally revised, the draft on promotion of new and renewable sources of energy.  Including the implementation of the World Solar Programme (document A/C.2/60/L.53), withdrawing an earlier text (document A/C.2/60/L.28).


It then approved, without a vote, a draft on the Convention on Biological Diversity (document A/C.2/60/L.55), withdrawing an earlier version (document A/C.2/60/L.22).


The Committee then turned to the draft decision on operational activities for development of the United Nations system (document A/C.2/60/L.30), deciding to hold a recorded vote.


In reply to a question by the representative of Cuba, Mr. KOUDELKA ( Czech Republic), Committee Vice-Chairman, said the United States had requested the vote.


The Committee then approved the text by a recorded vote of 157 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with no abstentions.  (See Annex III.)


Following that action, the representative of the United States said voluntary funding was the most effective way to ensure results and accountability.  Schemes such as the “voluntary indicative scales of contribution” were unacceptable because they were unrelated to performance results and accountability, and incompatible with the voluntary funding principle for operational activities enshrined in previous resolutions.


The representative of Norway said that while her country supported the text and praised the usefulness of the reports mentioned in it, it was to be hoped that the statistics contained in those reports, which dated from 2003, would be updated in time for the next meeting of the Economic and Social Council in 2006.


The Committee then decided to postpone consideration of the draft on the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (document A/C.2/60/L.56) until its next meeting.


ANNEX I


Vote on Operative Paragraph 13


Operative paragraph 13 of the draft resolution on international trade and development (document A/C.2/60/L.18) was approved by a recorded vote of 149 in favour to 4 against, with 5 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Canada, Japan, Republic of Korea, United States.


Abstain:  Iceland, Israel, Liechtenstein, Russian Federation, Switzerland.


Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Liberia, Mali, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Republic of Moldova, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Swaziland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.


ANNEX II


Vote on Trade and Development


The draft resolution on international trade and development (document A/C.2/60/L.18) was approved by a recorded vote of 109 in favour to 1 against, with 48 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Cuba, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom.


Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Liberia, Mali, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Republic of Moldova, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Swaziland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.


ANNEX III


Vote on Operational Activities for Development


The draft decision on operational activities for development of the United Nations system (document A/C.2/60/L.30) was approved by a recorded vote of 157 in favour to 1 against with no abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Abstain:  None.


Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Liberia, Mali, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Republic of Moldova, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Swaziland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.


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