22/12/2005
General Assembly
GA/10441

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixtieth General Assembly

Plenary

68th Meeting* (AM)


General Assembly calls for timely conclusion to negotiations on doha agenda,


as it adopts 38 texts recommended by its Second Committee

 


Success in World Trade Talks Could Help Raise Living Standards,

Generate Employment, Resolution on International Trade, Development States


The General Assembly called today for the successful and timely conclusion of negotiations on the World Trade Organization’s Doha agenda so as to maximize the international trading system’s contribution to raising living standards, eradicating poverty, and generating employment, according to one of 38 resolutions and four decisions adopted today on the recommendation of the Second Committee (Economic and Financial).


By other terms of that resolution, adopted by a recorded vote of 121 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 51 abstentions, the Assembly underscored the need to enhance market access for developing-country goods and services, and called on developed, as well as developing countries, to provide immediate duty- and quota-free market access to all products from the least developed countries.  (See Annex II.)


Also by that text, on international trade and development, the Assembly called for the acceleration of trade-related aspects of intellectual property rights and public health, in order to address the problems afflicting many developing countries, especially those resulting from HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and other epidemics.  It also stressed the need to put into operation the recent aid-for-trade initiative, to address adjustment challenges and to build supply and trade capacities, infrastructure and institutions in developing countries.


Among several other resolutions on macroeconomic policy, the Assembly adopted a text on external debt crisis and development, stressing the need to resolve the debt problems of low- and middle-income developing countries with unsustainable debt burdens that were ineligible for assistance under the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries Initiative.


Adopting a text on follow-up to the outcome of the International Conference on Financing for Development, the Assembly underlined the need to implement commitments laid down in the Monterrey Consensus, to establish good governance and the rule of law, create enabling environments so as to mobilize domestic resources, and enhance coherence and consistency in the international monetary, financial and trading systems.  It also decided to hold a follow-up international conference on Financing for Development between 2008 and 2009 to review implementation of the Monterrey Consensus, and welcomed the offer by the Government of Qatar to host that event.


By a resolution on the international financial system and development, the Assembly underscored the importance of competitive and inclusive private and public financial markets in mobilizing and allocating savings for productive investment, which would make vital contributions to national development.  
It stressed the importance of strong domestic institutions in promoting business activities and financial stability, which could be achieved through sound macroeconomic policies, as well as those aimed at strengthening corporate, financial and banking regulations.  The Assembly emphasized the essential need for effective and equitable participation by developing countries in formulating financial standards and codes, and underscored the need to ensure their implementation in reducing vulnerability to financial crisis and contagion.


Adopting a resolution on unilateral coercion, by a recorded 120 votes in favour to 1 against (United States), with 50 abstentions, the Assembly urged the international community to eliminate the use against developing countries of coercive economic measures that were neither authorized by United Nations organs nor consistent with the principles of the Organization’s Charter, and which contravened the basic principles of the multilateral trading system.  (See Annex III.)


The Assembly also adopted, without a vote, several texts relating to sustainable development, including one on the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, which endorsed the Hyogo Declaration and the Hyogo Framework for Action 2005-2015:  Building the Resilience of Nations and Communities to Disasters, as adopted by the World Conference on Disaster Reduction, held at Kobe, Hyogo, Japan, in January 2005.  That resolution called for a more effective integration of disaster-risk reduction into sustainable development policies, planning and programming; for the development and strengthening of institutions, mechanisms and capacities to build resilience to hazards; and for the incorporation of risk reduction approaches into the implementation of emergency preparedness, response and recovery programmes.


By a draft on follow-up to and implementation of the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States, the Assembly called for the full implementation of the commitments, programmes and targets adopted at the International Meeting in Port Louis, Mauritius, in January 2005, and for the fulfilment of the Mauritius Strategy.  It urged the Secretary-General to ensure that the Small Island Developing States Unit of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs was sufficiently and sustainably staffed to undertake its mandated functions.


The Assembly also adopted, without a vote, a resolution on the protection of the global climate for present and future generations, by which it called on States to work cooperatively towards achieving the ultimate objective of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.  In a separate, but related, prior action the Assembly adopted, by a recorded 170 votes in favour to 2 against (Japan, United States), with 1 abstention (Israel), operative paragraph 7 of that text, by which the Assembly requested the Secretary-General to make provisions for the session of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention and its subsidiary bodies in his proposal for the programme budget for the biennium 2006-2007.  (See Annex IV.)


Adopting a resolution on the International Year of Deserts and Desertification, 2006, by a recorded vote of 120 in favour to 1 against ( Syria), with 47 abstentions, the Assembly reiterated its call to Member States and international organizations to support activities related to desertification, including land degradation, especially in Africa and least developed countries.  (See Annex VII.)


By a recorded vote of 54 in favour to 33 against, with 68 abstentions, the Assembly adopted preambular paragraph 4 of that text, expressing concern at Israel’s extensive destruction of agricultural land and orchards in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including the uprooting of a vast number of fruit-bearing trees.  (See Annex V.)


And by a recorded vote on preambular paragraph 7 of the same text -- adopted by 97 in favour to 27 against, with 25 abstentions --  the Assembly welcomed Israel’s decision to host an international conference on “Deserts and Desertification:  “Challenges and Opportunities”, at Be’er Sheva in November 2006 (Annex VI).


According to a resolution on implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa, the Assembly called on Governments, in collaboration with multilateral organizations, to integrate desertification into their plans and strategies for sustainable development.  It took that action by a recorded 168 votes in favour to 2 against ( Japan, United States), with no abstentions.  (See Annex VIII.)


Adopting a resolution on the permanent sovereignty of Arab peoples in occupied territories over their natural resources, the Assembly called on Israel not to exploit, damage, cause loss or depletion of, or endanger natural resources in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and in the occupied Syrian Golan.  It took that action by a recorded 156 votes in favour to 6 against (Australia, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 8 abstentions (Albania, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Nauru, Papua New Guinea, Tuvalu).  (See Annex I.)


The Assembly stressed by that text that the wall being constructed by Israel in the Occupied Palestinian Territory contravened international law and seriously deprived the Palestinian people of their natural resources.  It also called on Israel to cease the dumping of waste materials in the Occupied Palestinian Territory and occupied Syrian Golan, which gravely threatened their water and land resources, posing an environmental hazard and health threat to civilian populations.


Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted a resolution by which it decided to declare 2008 the International Year of the Potato.  In another consensus action, it declared 2008 the International Year of Planet Earth.


Other sustainable development texts adopted by consensus included resolutions on implementation of Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development; natural disasters and vulnerability;implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa; Convention on Biological Diversity; sustainable mountain development;promotion of new and renewable sources of energy, including the implementation of the World Solar Programme; Global Code of Ethics for Tourism;and the report of the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme on its twenty-third session.


In the area of globalization and interdependence, the Assembly adopted, also by consensus, a resolution on preventing and combating corrupt practices and transfer of funds of illicit origin, condemning corruption in all its forms, including bribery, money-laundering and the transfer of assets of illicit origin.  Also by that text, it called for further international cooperation in support of national, subregional and regional efforts to prevent and combat corrupt practices and the transfer of assets of illicit origin, as well as for asset recovery consistent with the principles of the United NationsConvention against Corruption.


By a text on implementation of the first United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (1997-2006), the Assembly stressed that international cooperation was vital in supplementing developing-country efforts to use their domestic resources for development and poverty eradication.  It recognized the devastating effects of HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis and other infectious and contagious diseases on human development, economic growth, food security and poverty reduction, and urged Governments and the international community to give urgent priority to combating those diseases.


The Assembly also adopted a series of resolutions relating to special economic assistance for individual countries or regions, including a text on international cooperation and coordination for the human and ecological rehabilitation and economic development of Kazakhstan’s Semipalatinsk region.  By that text, it called on the international community and United Nations bodies to support that country in tackling the challenges of rehabilitating Semipalatinsk and its population, including by implementing Kazakhstan’s national programme to address comprehensively the problems facing the former Semipalatinsk nuclear-testing grounds.


According to another text, on humanitarian assistance and rehabilitation for Ethiopia, the Assembly stressed the need to address the underlying causes of food insecurity, as well as recovery, asset protection and sustainable development in affected areas of that country.  Further by that text, it called on development partners, in cooperation with the Ethiopian Government, to integrate relief efforts with recovery, asset protection and long-term development, including the structural and production options needed to stimulate accelerated rural growth.


Also under that theme, the Assembly adopted resolutions on economic assistance for the reconstruction and development of Djibouti; assistance for humanitarian relief and the economic and social rehabilitation of Somalia; and humanitarian assistance and reconstruction for El Salvador and Guatemala in the wake of tropical storm Stan earlier this year.


The Assembly also adopted texts relating to the role of the United Nations in promoting development in the context of globalization and interdependence; implementation of the outcome of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT);women in development; human resources development; South-South Cooperation; United Nations Institute for Training and Research; United Nations System Staff College in Turin, Italy; towards global partnerships; facilitation and reduction of the cost of transfer of migrant remittances; and science and technology for development.


In addition, the Assembly adopted, by a recorded vote of 172 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with no abstentions, a decision on operational activities for development of the United Nations.  By that text it took note of documents on improving United Nations performance at the country level, and on the activities of the United Nations Development Fund for Women.  (See Annex IX.)


Other decisions that the Assembly adopted today related to information and communication technologies for development; the International Decade for Action, “Water for Life”, 2005-2015; and the Second Committee’s draft programme of work for the sixty-first session of the General Assembly.


The General Assembly will meet again at 10 a.m. tomorrow, Friday, 23 December, when it is expected to consider the reports of its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary), and conclude its session.


Background


The General Assembly met this morning to follow up on implementation of the Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS, and to consider the reports of its Second Committee (Economic and Financial).


Document on HIV/AIDS


A draft resolution on implementation of the Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS (document A/60/L.43) is part of preparations for a 2006 follow-up to the outcome of the twenty-sixth special session of the General Assembly (2001) on that subject.  By the draft, the Assembly would decide to hold a meeting on 31 May and 1 June 2006 to review progress made in achieving the Declaration targets, followed by a meeting at the highest level on 2 June to continue the engagement of world leaders in a comprehensive global response to the pandemic.


The organizational arrangements for the meetings, as set out in the draft, would focus on interactive participation by relevant United Nations officials across the system, including the Secretary-General, the Assembly President, the Executive Director of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), special envoys and the head of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.  Representatives of civil society and of non-governmental and intergovernmental organizations will also be invited to participate.


By other terms of the draft, the Assembly would decide, without setting a precedent for other events, that the Assembly President would draw up a list of further participants by 15 February 2006 for consideration by Member States, on a non-objection basis for a final decision to be made by the Assembly on participation.  States would be encouraged to submit, by the end of the current year, progress reports on meeting the Declaration targets.  The Secretary-General would be asked to submit his report six weeks prior to the meetings.


Finally, UNAIDS and its co-sponsors would be asked to facilitate activities to scale up HIV prevention, treatment, care and support, so as to maximize progress towards the Declaration goal of universal access by 2010 for all who need treatment.  That would entail addressing issues related to availability of resources, removal of stigma, making medicine affordable and reducing vulnerability.  The results of activities would be summarized for review and input at the high-level meeting, with a focus on common obstacles and how to address them at an accelerated and expanded level.  Member States would be asked to consider adopting a new Declaration that would incorporate those results into a renewed commitment to implementing the Declaration.


Reports of the Second Committee


Before the Assembly were reports relating to sovereignty of occupied Arab peoples over their natural resources; information and communication technologies; macroeconomic policy questions; financing for development; sustainable development; human settlements; globalization and interdependence; countries in special situations; eradication of poverty; operational activities for development; training and research; and humanitarian and disaster relief.


Permanent Sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab Population in the Occupied Syrian Golan over their Natural Resources


The Second Committee’s report on that agenda item (document A/60/484) contains a draft resolution entitled permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources, which the Committee approved on 2 December by a recorded vote of 151 in favour to 7 against (Australia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 9 abstentions (Albania, Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, El Salvador, Malawi, Papua New Guinea, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu).


By the terms of that draft, the Assembly would call on Israel not to exploit, damage, cause loss or depletion of, or endanger natural resources in the Occupied Palestinian Territory and in the occupied Syrian Golan.  The Assembly would recognize the Palestinian people’s right to claim restitution as a result of such actions, resulting from illegal measures by Israel, expressing the hope that the issue would be dealt with in final negotiations between the Palestinian and Israeli sides.


Also by that text, the Assembly would stress that the wall being constructed by Israel in the Occupied Palestinian Territory is contrary to international law and is seriously depriving the Palestinian people of their natural resources, and call for full compliance with legal obligations mentioned in the 9 July 2004 advisory opinion of the International Court of Justice and General Assembly resolution ES-10/15.


By further terms, the Assembly would call upon Israel to cease the dumping of waste materials in the Occupied Palestinian Territory and in the occupied Syrian Golan, which gravely threatens their water and land resources, and poses an environmental hazard and health threat to the civilian populations.  It would call on Israel to comply strictly with its obligations under international law, including international humanitarian law, with respect to altering the character and status of the Occupied Palestinian Territory.


Information and Communication Technologies for Development


The Second Committee’s report on that item (document A/60/485) contains a draft decision on the report of the Secretary-General on information and communication technologies for development:  progress in the implementation of General Assembly resolution 57/295, which was approved without a vote on 23 November, and by which the Assembly would take note of that report (document A/60/323).


Macroeconomic policy questions


The Second Committee’s report on macroeconomic policy questions (documents A/60/486 and A/60/486/Add.1 through Add.3) contains three draft resolutions, the first of which, on international trade and development, was approved on 9 December by a recorded vote of 109 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 48 abstentions.  By that text, the Assembly would call for the successful and timely conclusion of negotiations on the Doha work programme to maximize the contribution of the trading system towards raising living standards, eradicating hunger and poverty, generating employment and achieving internationally agreed development goals.  It would underscore the need to enhance market access for goods and services of export interest to developing countries, as well as for strong, special and differential treatment, balanced rules, and well-targeted sustainably-financed technical assistance and capacity-building programmes for developing countries, so as to realize the development dimension in the Doha work programme.  The Assembly would also stress that the Sixth Ministerial Conference of the World Trade Organization (WTO), held in Hong Kong from 13 to 18 December 2005, should constitute an important milestone to that end, particularly for finalizing the negotiating modalities for the successful conclusion of the Doha Round by 2006.


Also by that text, the Assembly would stress the importance of open, transparent, inclusive, democratic and more orderly processes and procedures in the multilateral trading system, to enable developing countries to have their vital interests duly reflected in the outcome of trade negotiations.  The Assembly would stress the need for the effective operationalization of the recent aid-for-trade initiative, to address adjustment challenges, as well as to build the supply and trade capacities, infrastructure and institutions of developing countries, with sufficient and additional funding of the initiative to benefit recipient countries.


The Assembly would, by other terms, underline that the increasing interdependence of national economies in a globalizing world, and the emergence of rule-based regimes for international economic relations, have meant that the space for national economic policy is now often framed by international disciplines, commitments and global market considerations.  It would further underline that each Government must evaluate the trade-off between the benefits of accepting international rules and commitments and the constraints posed by the loss of policy space, and that all countries should consider the need for an appropriate balance between national policy space and international disciplines and commitments.


Also by that text, the Assembly would emphasize the need to ensure an international environment conducive to the full and effective integration of developing countries into the international trading system.  It would urge donors to provide the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) with increased resources to deliver effective and demand-driven assistance to those countries, as well as to enhance their contributions to the trust funds of the Integrated Framework for Trade-related Technical Assistance to Least Developed Countries and the Joint Integrated Technical Assistance Programme.


In a separate action, the Committee approved operative paragraph 13 of that draft resolution by a recorded 149 votes in favour to 4 against (Canada, Japan, Republic of Korea, United States), with 5 abstentions (Iceland, Israel, Liechtenstein, Russian Federation, Switzerland).


A draft resolution on unilateral economic measures as a means of political and economic coercion against developing countries was approved by the Committee on 2 December by a recorded vote of 117 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 48 abstentions.  By its terms, the Assembly would urge the international community to adopt measures to eliminate the use of unilateral coercive economic measures against developing countries that are not authorized by relevant United Nations organ, or are inconsistent with the principles set forth in the United Nations Charter, and that contravene the basic principles of the multilateral trading system.


By a draft resolution on the international financial system and development,which was approved on 15 December without a vote, the Assembly would stress the importance of cooperative efforts by all countries and institutions to cope with the risks of financial instability.  It would emphasize that economic growth should be further strengthened and sustained, noting that global economic growth depends on national economic growth, and that implementation of sound macroeconomic policies could significantly contribute to a revitalization of economic growth.


Also by that text, the Assembly would underline the importance of promoting international financial stability and sustainable growth, welcoming efforts to this end by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the Financial Stability Forum, as well as consideration by the International Monetary and Financial Committee, of ways to sharpen tools designed to promote international financial stability and enhance crisis prevention.  The Assembly would also underline the importance of national efforts to increase resilience to financial risk, stressing in this regard the importance of better assessment of a country’s debt burden and its ability to service that debt in both crisis prevention and resolution.


Further by that draft, the Assembly would underscore the importance of competitive and inclusive private and public financial markets in mobilizing and allocating savings towards productive investment, making a vital contribution to national development efforts and to an international financial architecture that is supportive of development.  By other terms, it would stress the importance of strong domestic institutions in promoting business activities and financial stability for the achievement of growth and development, including through sound macroeconomic policies and policies aimed at strengthening the regulatory systems of the corporate, financial and banking sectors, and also stress that international cooperation initiatives in those areas should encourage flows of capital to developing countries.


The Assembly would, by other terms, underline that enhancing the voice of developing countries and countries with economies in transition in the Bretton Woods institutions is of vital importance, and stress the importance of enhancing ongoing work in this regard.  It would emphasize that it is essential to ensure the effective and equitable participation of developing countries in the formulation of financial standards and codes, and underscore the need to ensure their implementation, on a voluntary and progressive basis, as a contribution to reducing vulnerability to financial crisis and contagion.


By a draft resolution on external debt crisis and development, which the Committee approved on 7 December without a vote, the Assembly would emphasize the special importance of a timely, effective, comprehensive and durable solution to developing-country debt problems, and of creditors and debtors sharing responsibility for preventing unsustainable debt.


Also by that text, the Assembly would stress that debt relief could play a key role in liberating resources that should be directed towards poverty eradication, sustained economic growth, sustainable development, and achievement of internationally agreed development goals.  It would underline that long-term debt sustainability depends on economic growth; mobilization of domestic resources and debtor-country export prospects; an enabling environment conducive to development; progress in following sound macroeconomic policies; transparent and effective regulatory frameworks; and success in overcoming structural development problems.


The Assembly would, by further terms, emphasize that country-specific circumstances and the impact of external shocks should be considered in debt sustainability analyses, underscore that no single indicator should be used to make definitive judgements about debt sustainability, and invite the IMF and World Bank to consider changes caused by natural disasters, conflicts, changes in global growth prospects, or in the terms of trade and other such events.


Also by that text, the Assembly would emphasize that the key element of the Gleneagles proposal by the Group of Eight, to cancel 100 per cent of debt owed by heavily indebted poor countries to the IMF, the International Development Association and the African Development Fund, is that debt relief will be fully financed by donors to ensure that the financing capacity of international financial institutions is not reduced.  It would further stress the importance of promoting responsible borrowing and lending, and the need to help heavily indebted poor countries manage their borrowing and avoid a build-up of unsustainable debt, including through grants.


By other terms, the Assembly would emphasize that the Evian approach of the Paris Club, decided upon by creditors in October 2003, deals with the bilateral debt of non-heavily indebted poor countries and low- and middle-income countries, considering not only financing gaps but also the medium-term debt sustainability of these countries.  Further by the draft, it would stress the need to resolve the debt problems of low- and middle-income developing countries with unsustainable debt burdens that are ineligible for assistance under the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries Initiative, and stress that this should not detract from official development assistance (ODA) resources, while maintaining the financial integrity of multilateral financial institutions.


Follow-up to and implementation of the outcome of the International Conference on Financing for Development


The Second Committee’s report contains a draft resolution on follow-up to and implementation of the outcome of the International Conference on Financing for Development, which was approved without a vote on 19 December.  By its terms, the Assembly would underline the importance of implementing the Monterrey commitment to sound policies, good governance at all levels and the rule of law.  It would further underline the importance of implementing the commitment to create an enabling environment for mobilizing domestic resources; the importance of sound economic policies, solid democratic institutions that are responsive to the needs of the people, and improved infrastructure as a basis for sustained economic growth, poverty eradication and employment creation; and the importance of implementing the commitment to enhance the coherence and consistency of the international monetary, financial and trading systems.


Also by that text, the Assembly would stress the importance of a universal, rule-based, open, non-discriminatory and equitable multilateral trading system, as well as meaningful trade liberalization that can substantially stimulate development worldwide, and emphasize the importance of fulfilling the development dimension of the Doha work programme, and the successful completion of the Doha round as soon as possible.  The Assembly would, by other terms, call on developed countries to continue to devise source-country measures to encourage and facilitate the flow of foreign direct investment (FDI), including through provision of export credits and other lending instruments, risk guarantees and business development services; and call upon developing countries and countries with economies in transition to continue their efforts to create a conducive domestic environment for attracting investments, including through achievement of a transparent, stable and predictable investment climate with proper contract enforcement and respect for property rights.


The Assembly would, by further terms, urge developed countries to make concrete efforts to establish timetables to achieve the target of 0.7 per cent of gross national product (GNP) for ODA by 2015, at least 0.5 per cent by 2010, and 0.15-0.20 per cent for the least developed countries by no later than 2010.  It would emphasize the importance of microcredit and microfinance in the eradication of poverty, and highlight that observance of the International Year of Microcredit 2005 has provided a significant opportunity to raise awareness, share best practices and further enhance financial sectors that support sustainable pro-poor financial services in all countries.


Further by the text, the Assembly would decide to hold a follow-up international conference on Financing for Development to review implementation of the Monterrey Consensus, between 2008 and 2009, and welcome the offer of the Government of Qatar to host this conference.  It would decide that the review conference should assess progress made, reaffirm goals and commitments, share best practices and lessons learned, identify obstacles and constraints encountered, actions and initiatives to overcome them, and important measures for further implementation, as well as new challenges and emerging issues.  It would further decide to commence the preparatory process, including a decision on the exact date of that conference at the sixty-first session of the General Assembly.


Sustainable Development


The Second Committee’s report on “Sustainable Development” (documents A/60/488 and A/60/488/Add.1 through Add.8) contains a draft resolution on the report of the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme on its twenty-third session, which wasapproved without a vote on 13 December,and by whichthe Assembly would call on the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to continue with activities relating to small island developing States, in pursuance of the outcome of the International Meeting to Review the Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States, held in Port Louis, Mauritius, in January 2005.


Also by that text, the Assembly would emphasize the need for UNEP to further contribute to sustainable development programmes, implementation of Agenda 21 and the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation, and to the work of the Commission on Sustainable Development (CSD).  It would also emphasize the need to enhance coordination and cooperation among United Nations organizations in the promotion of the environmental dimension of sustainable development, and welcome the Programme’s continued active participation in the United Nations Development Group.


A draft resolution on the Global Code of Ethics for Tourism, approved by the Committee without a vote on 13 December, would have the Assembly emphasize the need to promote responsible and sustainable tourism for the protection and safeguarding of natural and cultural heritage that could benefit all sectors of society and the natural environment, towards achieving sustainable development.  The Assembly would invite Member States and other stakeholders to support World Tourism Organization activities favouring sustainable tourism in developing countries for the eradication of poverty.  It would reiterate its invitation to Member States to consider introducing the Global Code of Ethics for Tourism into their laws, regulations and professional practices.


According to a draft resolution on the International Year of the Potato, 2008, which the Committee approved without a vote on 13 December, the Assembly would decide to declare 2008 the International Year of the Potato.  It would invite the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) to facilitate the implementation of the International Year, in collaboration with Governments, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research centres, other United Nations bodies, and non-governmental organizations.


By a draft on the International Year of Planet Earth, 2008, which the Committee approved without a vote on 11 November, the Assembly would declare 2008 the International Year of Planet Earth.  It would also designate the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) to organize activities to be undertaken during the Year, in collaboration with UNEP and other relevant United Nations bodies, the International Union of Geological Sciences and other Earth sciences societies and groups throughout the world.  Also by that draft, the Assembly would encourage Member States, the United Nations system and other actors to use the Year to increase awareness of the importance of Earth sciences in achieving sustainable development and promoting local, national, regional and international action.


A draft on implementation of Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development, approved without a vote on 9 December, would have the Assembly call on Governments, the Economic and Social Council, United Nations bodies, regional commissions and specialized agencies, international financial institutions, the Global Environment Facility, other intergovernmental organizations, as well as major groups, to ensure the implementation and follow-up to commitments, programmes and time-bound targets adopted at the World Summit.  The Assembly would encourage Governments to participate with representatives in the fourteenth session of the CSD, from departments and organizations working in the areas of energy for sustainable development, industrial development, air/atmosphere pollution and climate change, and finance.


The report also includes a document by which the Assembly would take note of the Secretary-General’s report on actions taken in organizing the activities of the International Decade for Action, “Water for Life”, 2005-2015.


By a draft resolution on follow-up to and implementation of the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States, which the Committee approved without a vote on 2 December, the Assembly would call for the full implementation of the commitments, programmes and targets adopted at the international meeting to review the implementation of that Programme and, to that end, for the fulfilment of the Mauritius Strategy adopted at that International Meeting.


Further by that text, the Assembly would urge the Secretary-General to ensure that the Small Island Developing States Unit in the Department of Economic and Social Affairs is sufficiently and sustainably staffed to undertake its mandated functions.  It would encourage small island developing States and their development partners to continue their wide consultations when developing implementation projects and programmes.  The Assembly would request the United Nations system to mainstream the Mauritius Strategy for Implementation in their work programmes and to establish a small island developing States focal point within their respective secretariats.


By a draft resolution on the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, approved by the Committee without a vote on 2 December, the Assembly would endorse the Hyogo Declaration and the Hyogo Framework for Action 2005-2015:  Building the Resilience of Nations and Communities to Disasters, as adopted by the World Conference on Disaster Reduction, held at Kobe, Hyogo, Japan, in January 2005.  Further, it would call for a more effective integration of disaster-risk reduction into sustainable development policies, planning and programming; for the development and strengthening of institutions, mechanisms and capacities to build resilience to hazards; and for a systemic incorporation of risk reduction approaches into the implementation of emergency preparedness, response and recovery programmes.


Also by that text, the Assembly would call upon the United Nations system and international organizations to integrate the goals of the Hyogo Framework for Action into their strategies and programmes, making use of existing mechanisms to assist developing countries in urgently designing disaster-risk reduction measures.  The Assembly would call on the United Nations system to support efforts led by disaster-stricken countries for disaster-risk reduction in post-disaster recovery and rehabilitation processes.  It would stress also the importance of strengthening the capacity of the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction system to provide a solid basis for action, as mandated by the Hyogo Framework for Action.  It would stress also the importance of identifying, assessing and managing risks prior to the occurrence of disasters, as well as the importance of integrating disaster-risk reduction into development plans and poverty eradication programmes.


The Assembly would, by further terms, stress the need to foster better understanding and knowledge of the causes of disasters, and to build and strengthen coping capacities by transferring and exchanging experiences and technical knowledge, access to relevant data and information, and strengthening institutional arrangements, including community organizations.  It would also emphasize the need for the international community to maintain its focus beyond emergency relief and support medium- and long-term rehabilitation, reconstruction and risk reduction, as well as stress the importance of implementing programmes related to poverty eradication, sustainable development and disaster-risk reduction management in the most vulnerable regions.


According to a draft on natural disasters and vulnerability, which the Committee approved without a vote on 2 December, the Assembly would stress the importance of international cooperation and partnerships to support national efforts for sustainable development and disaster-risk reduction, including through implementation of and follow-up to the Hyogo Framework for Action.  It would stress the importance of the Hyogo Declaration and the Hyogo Framework for Action and the priorities for action that States, regional and international organizations, and international financial institutions, as well as other concerned actors, should consider in their approach to disaster-risk reduction.


Also by the text, the Assembly would also emphasize the importance of addressing underlying risk factors identified in the Hyogo Framework for Action, and the importance of promoting the integration of risk reduction associated with geological and hydrometeorological hazards in disaster-risk reduction programmes.  It would stress the importance of close cooperation and coordination among Governments, the United Nations system, other international and regional organizations, non-governmental organizations and other partners, taking into account the need to develop disaster-management strategies, including people-centred early-warning systems.


By a text on the protection of the global climate for present and future generations of mankind, approved by the Committee without a vote on 15 December, the Assembly would call on States to work cooperatively towards achieving the ultimate objective of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.  It would encourage cooperation to promote complementarities among the secretariats of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa, and the Convention on Biological Diversity.  The Assembly would request the Secretary-General to make provisions for the session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, and its subsidiary bodies, in his proposal for the programme budget for the biennium 2006-2007.


In a related prior action, the Committee approved operative paragraph 7 of that text by a recorded 158 votes in favour to 3 against ( Japan, Somalia, United States), with 2 abstentions ( Israel, Kazakhstan).


According to a draft resolution on sustainable mountain development, which the Committee approved without a vote on 13 December, the Assembly would note that the growing demand for natural resources, including water; the consequences of erosion, deforestation and other forms of watershed degradation; the occurrence of natural disasters; as well as increasing emigration; the pressures of industry, transport, tourism, mining, agriculture; and the consequences of global climate change are key challenges in fragile mountain ecosystems to implementing sustainable development and eradicating poverty in mountains, consistent with the Millennium Development Goals.


The Assembly would, by further terms, underline that national action is a key element in achieving progress in sustainable mountain development, welcome its steady increase in recent years with a multitude of events, activities and initiatives.  It would underline also the importance for sustainable development in mountains of exploring a wide range of funding sources, such as public-private partnerships; increased opportunities for microfinance, including microinsurance, small housing loans, savings, education and health accounts and support for entrepreneurs seeking to develop small and medium-sized businesses; and, on a case-by-case basis, debt for sustainable development swaps.


Also by the text, the Assembly would underline the importance of enhancing the sustainability of ecosystems that provide essential resources and services for human well-being and economic activity, and developing innovative means of financing for their protection.  It would underline also the need for improved access for women in mountain regions, as well as the need to strengthen their role in decision-making processes that affect their communities, cultures and environments.  The Assembly would stress the importance of capacity-building, institutional strengthening and educational programmes to foster sustainable mountain development at all levels, and to enhance awareness of good practices in sustainable development in mountains, and the nature of relationships between highland and lowland areas.  It would stress that indigenous cultures, traditions and knowledge are to be fully considered, respected and promoted in development policy and planning in mountain regions, and underline the importance of promoting full participation and involvement of mountain communities in decisions that affect them, and of integrating indigenous knowledge, heritage and values in all development initiatives.


According to a draft on promotion of new and renewable sources of energy, including the implementation of the World Solar Programme, which the Committee approved on 9 December without a vote, the Assembly would call on Governments and other relevant stakeholders, such as regional and international organizations, to combine the increased use of new and renewable energy resources, more efficient use of energy, greater reliance on advanced energy technologies, including advanced and cleaner fossil fuel technologies, and the sustainable use of traditional energy resources.  The Assembly would stress that wider use of renewable energy requires technology transfer and diffusion on a global scale, including through North-South and South-South cooperation.


By a draft resolution on implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa, which was approved without a vote on 15 December, the Assembly would call on Governments, in collaboration with multilateral organizations -- including the Global Environment Facility implementation agencies -- to integrate desertification into their plans and strategies for sustainable development.


Also by the text, the Assembly would stress the importance of implementing all decisions of the Conference of the Parties, particularly those at its seventh session, on strengthening of the Committee on Science and Technology, and on the follow-up to the report of the Joint Inspection Unit, and support development of a 10-year strategy to foster implementation of the Convention.


In a related prior action, the Committee approved operative paragraph 18 of that draft by a recorded vote of 159 in favour to 2 against ( Japan, United States), with 1 abstention ( Israel).


A draft on the International Year of Deserts and Desertification, 2006, approved on 16 December by a recorded vote of 111 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 42 abstentions, would have the Assembly reiterate its call to Member States and international organizations to support activities related to desertification, including land degradation, to be organized by affected countries, in particular African and least developed countries.  The Assembly would also reiterate its call to countries to contribute to the Convention to Combat Desertification, and to undertake special initiatives in observance of the Year.  Further, it would request the Executive Secretary of the Convention to make available to the Parties to the Convention and to observers, a consolidated list of all activities reported, including lessons learned and best practices, in order to coordinate information and avoid overlapping of activities.


By a related draft resolution, approved on 16 December by a recorded vote of 83 in favour to 34 against, with 30 abstentions, the Assembly would amend the related draft with a new preambular paragraph, welcoming the decision of the Government of Israel to host an international conference on “Deserts and Desertification:  Challenges and Opportunities”, at Be’er Sheva in November 2006.


Another related text, approved on 16 December by a recorded vote of 48 in favour to 29 against, with 74 abstentions would have the Assembly add a new preambular paragraph, after the third preambular paragraph, reading:  “Deeply concerned also at the extensive destruction by Israel, the occupying Power, of agricultural land and orchards in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including the uprooting of a vast number of fruit-bearing trees.”


According to a draft on the Convention on Biological Diversity, which the Committee approved without a vote on 9 December, the Assembly would urge Member States to fulfil their commitments to significantly reduce the rate of biodiversity loss by 2010, and emphasize that this will require an appropriate focus on biodiversity loss in their policies and programmes, and the continued provision of new and additional financial and technical resources to developing countries, including through the Global Environmental Facility.  The Assembly would urge parties to the Convention to facilitate the transfer of technology for its implementation.  It would stress the importance of reducing duplicative reporting requirements of the biodiversity-related conventions, while respecting their independent legal status and independent mandates.


Implementation of the outcome of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT)


The Second Committee’s report on that agenda item (document A/60/489) contains a draft resolution on implementation of the outcome of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT),which the Committee approved without a vote on 2 December.  By its terms, the Assembly would call for continued financial support to UN-HABITAT through increased voluntary contributions to the United Nations Habitat and Human Settlements Foundation, and invite Governments to provide multi-year funding to support programme implementation.  It would call for increased, non-earmarked contributions to the United Nations Habitat and Human Settlements Foundation, and emphasize the need for UN-HABITAT to develop a results-based and less fragmented budget structure, regardless of funding source.


By other terms, the Assembly would stress the need for the international community to fully implement commitments to support Governments of developing countries and countries with economies in transition in implementing the Habitat Agenda, the Declaration on Cities and Other Human Settlements in the New Millennium, and the Millennium Declaration by providing the needed resources, capacity-building and technology transfer, as well as by creating an international enabling environment.  The Assembly would invite international donors and financial institutions to contribute generously to the Water and Sanitation Trust Fund, the Slum Upgrading Facility and the technical cooperation trust funds, in enabling UN-HABITAT to assist developing countries to mobilize public investment and private capital for slum upgrading, shelter and basic services.  By further terms, it would stress the importance of publishing the financial rules and regulations of the United Nations Habitat and Human Settlements Foundation in time for their adoption no later than the end of 2005.


Globalization and interdependence


The Second Committee’s report on globalization and interdependence (documents A/60/490 and Add.1 through Add.4) contains a draft resolution on the role of the United Nations in promoting development in the context of globalization and interdependence, which the Committee approved without a vote on 15 December.  By its terms, the Assembly would stress that, in the increasingly globalizing interdependent world economy, a holistic approach to the interconnected national, international and systemic challenges of financing for development is essential, and that such an approach must open up opportunities for all and help to ensure that resources are created and used effectively, and that solid and accountable institutions are established at all levels.  It would stress that development strategies have to be formulated with a view to minimizing the negative social impact of globalization and maximizing the positive impact, while striving to ensure that all groups of the population benefit from it, and that at the international level, efforts should focus on the means to achieve internationally agreed development goals.


According to that text, the Assembly would stress further that in the common pursuit of growth, poverty eradication and sustainable development, a critical challenge is to ensure the necessary internal conditions for mobilizing domestic savings, both public and private, sustaining adequate levels of productive investment and increasing human capacity.  A crucial task is to enhance the efficacy, coherence and consistency of macroeconomic policies and an enabling domestic environment, which is vital for mobilizing domestic resources, increasing productivity, reducing capital flight, encouraging the private sector and attracting and making effective use of international investment and assistance.


By other terms, the Assembly would underline that the increasing interdependence of national economies in a globalizing world and the emergence of rule-based regimes for international economic relations, have meant that the space for national economic policy, especially in the areas of trade, investment and industrial development, is now often framed by international disciplines, commitments and global market considerations.  The Assembly would underline also that in addressing the linkages between globalization and sustainable development, particular focus should be placed on identifying and implementing mutually reinforcing policies and practices that promote sustained economic growth, social development and environment protection.  It would underline further that the issue of enhancing the voice of developing countries and countries with economies in transition in the Bretton Woods institutions is of vital importance, and stress the importance of advancing ongoing work in this regard.


According to a draft on science and technology for development, approved without a vote on 13 December, would have the Assembly affirm its commitment to strengthen and enhance existing mechanisms and to support initiatives for research and development, including through voluntary partnerships between the public and private sectors; to address the special needs of developing countries in health, agriculture, conservation, sustainable use of natural resources and environmental management, energy, forestry, and the impact of climate change; and to promote and facilitate access to and development of, transfer and diffusion of technologies, including environmentally sound technologies and the corresponding know-how, to developing countries.


The Assembly would also affirm its commitment to promote and support greater efforts to develop renewable sources of energy, such as solar, wind and geothermal energy; to implement policies at the national and international levels to attract both public and private investment, domestic and foreign, that enhance knowledge, transfer technology on mutually agreed terms and raise productivity; and to support the efforts of developing countries, individually and collectively, to harness new agricultural technologies in order to increase agricultural productivity through environmentally sustainable means.


By the terms of a draft on international migration and development, which the Committee approved without a vote on 16 December, the Assembly would decide to hold the High-level Dialogue on International Migration and Development in New York on 14 and 15 September 2006.  It would decide also that the Dialogue consist of four plenary meetings and four interactive round tables, focusing on the impacts of international migration on economic and social development; measures to protect the human rights of migrants and prevent the trafficking of persons; remittances; and building capacity and sharing best-practices at bilateral and regional levels for the benefit of countries and migrants.  The Assembly would decide further to hold one-day informal interactive hearings in 2006 with representatives of non-governmental organizations, civil society organizations and the private sector, to be presided over by the President of the General Assembly, and request him to prepare a summary of the hearings prior to the High-level Dialogue in September 2006.


In a related prior action, the Committee approved operative paragraph 7 of that text by a recorded vote of 159 in favour to 2 against ( Japan, United States), with 1 abstention ( Israel)


A draft resolution on facilitation and reduction of the cost of transfer of migrant remittances, which the Committee approved without a vote on 15 December, would have the Assembly encourage Governments and other stakeholders to consider adopting measures, in accordance with national legislation, that facilitate migrant remittance flows to recipient countries, including through simplifying procedures and facilitating access to formal means of remittance transfers; and promoting access to, and awareness of the availability and use of, financial services for migrants.


By the terms of a draft resolution on preventing and combating corrupt practices and transfer of funds of illicit origin and returning such assets, in particular to the countries of origin, consistent with the United Nations Convention against Corruption, which was approved without a vote on 13 December, the Assembly would condemn corruption in all its forms, including bribery, money-laundering and the transfer of assets of illicit origin.  It would reiterate its invitation to all Member States and competent regional economic integration organizations, to ratify or accede to, and fully implement the Convention as soon as possible.  The Assembly would call for further international cooperation in support of national, subregional and regional efforts to prevent and combat corrupt practices and the transfer of assets of illicit origin, as well as for asset recovery consistent with the principles of the Convention, particularly chapter V.  It would encourage all Governments to prevent, combat and penalize corruption in all its forms, and work for the prompt return of illicitly acquired assets, consistent with the Convention, particularly chapter V.


Further by that text, the Assembly would urge Member States to abide by the principles of proper management of public affairs and public property, fairness, responsibility and equality before the law, and the need to safeguard integrity and to foster a culture of transparency, accountability and rejection of corruption.  It would welcome actions by the private sector, including small and large companies and transnational corporations, to remain fully engaged in the fight against corruption, and call upon the private sector to continue making efforts in this regard.  It would emphasize the need for all relevant stakeholders, including within the United Nations system, to continue to promote corporate responsibility and accountability.


Groups of Countries in Special Situations


The Second Committee’s report on groups of countries in special situations (documents A/60/491 and Add.1 through Add.2) contains a draft resolution on the Third United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries:  high-level meeting on the midterm comprehensive global review of the implementation of the Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2001-2010.  That text, which the Committee approved without a vote on 15 December, would have the Assembly decide to convene a high-level meeting on the comprehensive global review of the implementation of the Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2001-2010 in New York from 19 to 20 September 2006, to be chaired by the President of the General Assembly.  It would decide also to convene a three-day preparatory meeting of experts during its sixtieth session, preferably on 4 to 6 September, for the review in order to propose measures to advance implementation of the Programme of Action.


By other terms, the Assembly would stress that the global review should assess progress made in implementing commitments, and provide the occasion to reaffirm goals and objectives agreed upon at the Third United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries; share best practices and lessons learned; and identify obstacles and constraints, actions and initiatives to overcome them, and important measures for further implementing the Brussels Programme of Action, as well as new challenges and emerging issues.


Further by that draft, the Assembly would emphasize that the comprehensive global review is of particular significance, as it will provide an opportunity for the international community, in particular, the least developed countries and their development partners, to discuss implementation of the Brussels Programme of Action, so as to ensure the timely, effective and full implementation of the Programme of Action during the remainder of the Decade.  The Assembly would stress that adequate resources should be provided for full participation of least developed countries in the comprehensive review at the national, regional and global levels, and request the Secretary-General to mobilize extra-budgetary resources to cover the cost of participation of two Government representatives from each least developed country in the high-level meeting.


In a separate prior action, the Committee approved operative paragraph 6 of that text by a recorded 117 votes in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 45 abstentions.  In another separate action, the Committee rejected an attempt to amend the text, by which the Assembly would have convened a preparatory meeting of experts on 4, 5 and 6 September 2006.  The proposed amendment was rejected by a recorded vote of 45 in favour to 112 against, with 5 abstentions ( Armenia, Iceland, Israel, Japan, and Norway).


A draft resolution on specific actions related to the particular needs and problems of landlocked developing countries:  outcome of the International Ministerial Conference of Landlocked and Transit Developing Countries and Donor Countries and International Financial and Development Institutions on Transit Transport Cooperation was approved without a vote on 15 December.  By its terms, the Assembly would emphasize that assistance for the improvement of transit transport facilities and services should be integrated into the overall economic development strategies of the landlocked and transit developing countries, and that donor countries should consequently take into account the requirements for the long-term restructuring of the economies of landlocked developing countries.


By other terms of that text, the Assembly would stress the need for the implementation of the São Paulo Consensus, adopted at the eleventh session of the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) held in São Paulo, Brazil, from 13 to 18 June 2004, in particular paragraphs 66 and 84, by the relevant international organizations and donors in a multi-stakeholder approach.


Eradication of Poverty and Other Development Issues


The Second Committee’s report on that agenda item (documents A/60/492 and Add.1 through Add.3) contains a draft on implementation of the first United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty, which the Committee approved without a vote on 19 December.  By that text, the Assembly would stress that international cooperation is vital in supplementing developing-country efforts to use their domestic resources for development and poverty eradication, together with coherent and consistent domestic policies.  It would underline that each country is primarily responsible for its own sustainable development and poverty eradication, that the role of national policies and development strategies cannot be overemphasized, and that concerted and concrete measures are needed to enable developing countries to eradicate poverty and achieve sustainable development.


Also by that text, the Assembly would recognize the devastating effect of HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis and other infectious and contagious diseases on human development, economic growth, food security and poverty reduction, and urge Governments and the international community to give urgent priority to combating those diseases.  Further, it would stress the importance of meeting the special needs of Africa, where poverty remains a major challenge and most countries have failed to benefit fully from globalization.  The Assembly would call on the Governments of least developed countries and their development partners to fully implement commitments set out in the Brussels Declaration and Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2001-2010, adopted in Brussels in 2001.


The Assembly would, by other terms, emphasize that creditors and debtors must share responsibility for preventing unsustainable debt situations, and stress that debt relief can play a key role in liberating resources that should be directed towards activities consistent with poverty eradication, sustained economic growth and sustainable development.  Also, it would stress that strategies, programmes and international assistance for reconstruction and rehabilitation in countries emerging from conflict, which are faced with damaged physical and social infrastructure, scarce employment opportunities, reduced foreign investment and increased capital flight, should create employment and eradicate poverty.


A draft on women in development, approved without a vote on 19 December, would have the Assembly call on Governments, the United Nations system, international and regional organizations, and civil society to commit fully to implementing the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, and the outcome of the twenty-third special session of the General Assembly.  It would urge Governments to develop strategies to mainstream a gender perspective in economic and development policies, and in monitoring and evaluating related programmes of action.  The Assembly would call on all Governments and other stakeholders to address gender wage gaps and labour market segmentation, and improve the conditions and security of women’s employment.


Also by the text, the Assembly would call on Governments to incorporate a gender perspective in their policies on international migration, including for the protection of women migrants from violence, discrimination, trafficking, exploitation and labour abuse.  It would stress the importance of developing national strategies to promote entrepreneurial activities that would generate income among disadvantaged women and those living in poverty.  The Assembly would urge Governments to ensure women’s equal rights with men and their full access -- particularly for rural women and those in the informal sector -- to education, training, employment, technology and economic and financial resources, including credit.


Further by that draft, the Assembly would urge Governments to take measures to eliminate discrimination against women with regard to access to bank loans, mortgages and other forms of financial credit, giving special attention to poor, uneducated women, and to support women’s access to legal assistance.  It would urge States to design and revise laws that ensure that women are accorded full and equal rights to own land and other property, including through inheritance.  The Assembly would stress the importance of collecting and exchanging all relevant information needed on the role of women in development, including data on international migration, as well as the need to develop statistics disaggregated by sex.  It would, further, decide that the survey’s next theme would be “Women’s control over economic resources and access to financial resources, including through microfinance”.


According to a draft resolution on human resources development, approved without a vote on 7 December, the Assembly would urge the adoption of cross-sectoral approaches to human resources development, combining economic growth, poverty eradication, provision of basic social services, sustainable livelihoods, empowerment of women, involvement of young people, the needs of vulnerable groups of society and local indigenous communities, political freedom, popular participation, and respect for human rights, justice and equity.


By other terms, the Assembly would call for the adoption of policies to facilitate investment on infrastructure and capacity development, particularly in education, health, and science and technology, and further encourage Governments to manage educational resources transparently.  The Assembly would also call for enhanced cooperation among all development partners, and for steps to integrate gender perspectives into human resources development strategies.  It would also emphasize the need to ensure women’s participation in formulating and implementing such policies, strategies and actions.


Operational Activities for Development


The Second Committee’s report on that agenda item (documents A/60/493 and Add.1 through Add.2) contains a draft decision on operational activities for development of the United Nations system, which the Committee approved on 9 December by a recorded vote of 157 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with no abstentions.  That text would have the Assembly decide to request the Economic and Social Council to consider the reports in conjunction with General Assembly resolution 59/250, on evaluating full implementation of that draft resolution.  The Assembly would take note of the Joint Inspection Unit report on measures to improve overall performance of the United Nations system at the country level, the related note by the Secretary-General transmitting the comments of the United Nations System Chief Executives Board for Coordination on that report, and the Secretary-General’s note transmitting the report of the Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) on activities of the United Nations Development Fund for Women.


A draft resolution on South-South Cooperation, which the Committee approved without a vote on 13 December, would have the Assembly stress that South-South cooperation offers viable opportunities for developing countries in their individual and collective pursuit of sustained economic growth and sustainable development.  It would urge all relevant United Nations organizations and multilateral institutions to intensify their efforts to mainstream the use of South-South cooperation in the design, formulation and implementation of their regular programmes and to consider increasing allocations of human, technical and financial resources for supporting South-South cooperation initiatives.  In that regard, it would take note of the initiatives contained in the Havana Programme of Action adopted by the first South Summit, the Marrakech Framework for the Implementation of South-South Cooperation and the Doha Plan of Action.


Training and Research


The Second Committee’s report on (documents A/60/494 and Add.1 through Add.2) contains a draft resolution on the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR), which the Committee without a vote approved on 13 December.  By its terms, the Assembly would underline the need to further develop and expand the scope of partnerships between the Institute and other organizations and United Nations bodies with respect to their training programmes.  It would stress that the courses of UNITAR should focus primarily on development issues and the management of international affairs.


Also by that draft, the Assembly would urge States that had interrupted their voluntary contributions to consider resuming them in view of the successful restructuring and revitalization of the Institute.  It would stress the need for an expeditious solution of issues related to UNITAR’s rent, rental rates and maintenance costs.  It would encourage the Institute’s Board of Trustees to resolve the critical financial situation of the Institute, to broaden its donor base and further increase contributions to the General Fund.


By a draft resolution on the United Nations System Staff College in Turin, Italy, which the Committee approved without a vote on 7 December, the Assembly would invite the international community to strengthen its support to the College through voluntary contributions, so as to enable it to consolidate its distinctive contribution to fostering a cohesive management culture across the United Nations system that would be responsive to the requirements of Member States.  It would encourage the Staff College to provide strategic leadership in order to increase operational effectiveness, promote inter-agency collaboration and strengthen management culture, including the development of new systems of performance management, flexible and collaborative work structures, and cost-effective service delivery to clients and beneficiaries.  The Assembly would call on relevant United Nations bodies, including the United Nations University, the UNITAR and the Staff College, to collaborate closely to those ends.


Towards Global Partnerships


The Second Committee’s report on that agenda item (document A/60/495) contains a draft resolution entitled towards global partnerships, which was approved without a vote on 15 December.  That text would have the Assembly recall that the 2005 World Summit resolved to enhance the contribution of non-governmental organizations, civil society, the private sector and other stakeholders in national development efforts.  It would request the Secretary-General to enhance partnership management through adequate training at all levels; institutional capacity in country offices; strategic focus and local ownership; the sharing of best practices; and the improvement of partner selection processes.  Further, it would request the Secretary-General, in consultation with Member States, to promote impact-assessment mechanisms, taking into account the best tools available.


Strengthening of the Coordination of Humanitarian and Disaster Relief Assistance of the United Nations, including Special Economic Assistance:  Special Economic Assistance to Individual Countries or Regions


The Second Committee’s report on that agenda item contains five draft resolutions, the first of which, on international cooperation and coordination for the human and ecological rehabilitation and economic development of Kazakhstan ’s Semipalatinsk region, was approved without a vote on 1 November.  By that text, the Assembly would call on the international community and United Nations bodies to continue their support for that country in tackling the challenges of rehabilitating Semipalatinsk and its population, including by implementing Kazakhstan’s national programme on addressing the problems of the former Semipalatinsk nuclear-testing grounds in a comprehensive manner.


By other terms, the Assembly would call upon States, multilateral financial organizations, non-governmental organizations and other international entities to contribute to the region’s human and ecological rehabilitation and economic development.  It would also urge the international community to assist Kazakhstan in formulating and implementing treatment and care programmes for the affected population, and in ensuring economic growth and sustainable development in the region.


According to a draft on economic assistance for the reconstruction and development of Djibouti , approved without a vote on 11 November, the Assembly would appeal to all Governments, international financial institutions, specialized agencies and non-governmental organizations to respond adequately to the country’s financial and material needs, in line with its poverty-reduction strategy.  It would encourage the Government of Djibouti to continue its efforts to consolidate democracy, the promotion of good governance and the eradication of poverty, despite difficult economic and regional realities.


By the terms of a draft on humanitarian assistance and rehabilitation for Ethiopia, approved without a vote on 1 November, the Assembly would stress the need to address the underlying causes of food insecurity, as well as recovery, asset protection and sustainable development in affected areas of the country.  It would call on development partners, in cooperation with the Ethiopian Government, to integrate relief efforts with recovery, asset protection and long-term development, including the structural and production options needed to stimulate accelerated rural growth.


Further by the text, the Assembly would also call on those parties to address the underlying causes of the country’s recurrent drought, in line with the poverty reduction strategy paper and the rural development strategy, bearing in mind the need to prevent such crises in the future, and to improve the population’s resilience.


By a draft on assistance for humanitarian relief and the economic and social rehabilitation of Somalia, approved without a vote on 11 November, the Assembly would urge donor countries, regional and subregional organizations to contribute to that country’s reconstruction and rehabilitation through the rapid assistance programme and efforts coordinated by the United Nations.  It would call on the international community to assist in establishing aggressive programmes focusing on short-, medium- and long-term measures in the areas of institutional development, policy and legislation development, land use and soil management, marine and coastal ecosystem management, and disaster management.  It should also assist in conducting critical assessments of environmental impacts in tsunami-affected areas, drought and flood-affected areas, and of toxic and other wastes.


Also by that text, the Assembly would urge Somali leaders to increase the effectiveness of humanitarian assistance by improving security on the ground, among other actions.  It would also urge the international community to support the need for peacebuilding measures and for the speedy implementation of programmes for the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration of militias throughout Somalia, to stabilize the entire country and ensure the effectiveness of its Transitional Federal Government.  The Assembly would further call on the international community to urgently provide assistance and relief to the Somali people, to alleviate the consequences of the civil war.


A draft on humanitarian assistance and reconstruction for El Salvador and Guatemala, which the Committee approved without a vote on 11 November, would have the Assembly call on the international community to respond to the Flash Appeal for Guatemala, and to the joint United Nations Agency Appeal in El Salvador, in the wake of tropical storm Stan.  Also by that text, the Assembly would appeal to Member States and United Nations bodies, as well as international financial institutions and development agencies, to support the relief, rehabilitation and assistance effort for those countries.


The Assembly would, by further terms, emphasize the importance of investing in disaster-risk reduction, and encourage the international community to cooperate with the Governments of El Salvador and Guatemala towards that end.  It would request the United Nations, international financial institutions and development agencies to help the affected populations of El Salvador and Guatemala overcome the emergency by rehabilitating their economies, in line with short-, medium- and long-term national priorities, and to help them strengthen their disaster preparedness.


Revitalization of Work of General Assembly


The Committee’s report on that agenda item (document A/60/497) contains the draft programme of work of the Second Committee for the sixty-first session of the General Assembly.


Action on Second Committee Reports


ABDULMALIK ALSHABIBI ( Yemen), Rapporteur of the Second Committee, introduced the Committee’s reports.


The Assembly first took up the Second Committee’s report on permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources (document A/60/484).  It adopted the related draft resolution by a recorded vote of 156 in favour to 6 against (Australia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, United States), with 8 abstentions (Albania, Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Nauru, Papua New Guinea, Tuvalu).  (See Annex I.)


Speaking after the vote, the representative of Israel expressed regret over the adoption of the resolution, which presented a one-sided, unbalanced and inaccurate view of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, and abused the Committee’s mandate.  It addressed issues that did not enhance the Committee’s work or offer a solution, serving no purpose for any party.  It also undermined the effectiveness, fairness and integrity of the United Nations, as well as an important process that had been agreed upon by the Quartet, calling for bilateral negotiations towards a lasting peace agreement.  As in previous years, Israel had voted against the resolution.


The representative of Syria said the Assembly had again reaffirmed the rights of the Palestinian people and heard representatives state that the occupying Power had ignored the international community’s call for justice and peace.  The Assembly had also expressed the international community’s concern over the occupying Power’s abuse of the region’s natural resources.


The Observer for Palestine said the vote sent an important message of international support to a people living without access to their own resources, giving them hope that their rights would be restored.  The international community had an obligation to protect people who had been deprived of their rights, by legal and all other means.


Taking up the Committee’s report on information and communication technologies for development (document A/60/485), the Assembly then adopted the related draft decision without a vote.


The Assembly then took up the Committee’s report on macroeconomic policy questions (documents A/60/486 and Add.1-3), which contained four draft resolutions.


By a recorded vote of 121 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 51 abstentions, the Assembly adopted the draft on international trade and development.  (See Annex II.)


It then took up the draft on unilateral economic measures as a means of political and economic coercion against developing countries, deciding to hold a recorded vote on it.


Speaking before the vote, the representative of the United States said he opposed the resolution, which was a direct challenge to the prerogative of sovereign States freely to conduct commercial relations and decide on their trading partners.  The resolution was aimed at undermining the international ability to respond to acts that were offensive to international norms, and without consequences States would have no incentive to abandon such actions.


Economic sanctions could be an effective mechanism in legitimate foreign policy, as well as an influential diplomatic tool provided for in the United Nations Charter, he continued.  Such measures had been used to change the racist regime in South Africa and to cement solidarity with people fighting for dignity and freedom.  They were not “coercion” against developing countries, but a helping hand to peoples coerced by their Governments.


The Assembly then adopted the draft by a recorded vote of 120 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 50 abstentions.  (See Annex III.)


Acting without a vote, it then adopted the draft on the international financial system and development.


It then adopted the draft resolution on the external debt crisis and development in another consensus action.


Turning to the Committee’s report on follow-up to and implementation of the outcome of the International Conference on Financing for Development (document A/60/487), the Assembly then adopted the related draft resolution without a vote, as orally corrected.


Taking up the Second Committee’s report on sustainable development (document A/60/488 and Add.1-8), which contained 13 draft resolutions, the Assembly then adopted, without a vote, draft resolutions relating to:  the report of the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) on its twenty-third session (as orally corrected); Global Code of Ethics for Tourism; International Year of the Potato, 2008; and International Year of Planet Earth, 2008.


The representative of Monaco said his country had been unable to co-sponsor the resolution, but was prepared to support all actions to protect the environment.  Monaco would do everything in its power to promote the Year, especially in developing countries.


The representative of Venezuela, describing the resolution and related documents as illegitimate, said his delegation had gone along with the consensus due to the importance of the subject and because it supported small island developing States.  However, some of the resolution’s provisions were at odds with other instruments, such as the Convention relating to small island States, and the maritime convention regarding the translation of traditional law into national legislation.  The Mauritius Strategy was flawed in that respect and Venezuela was opposed to provisions of the resolution that referred to it.


The representative of Belgium said he supported the resolution without having had the opportunity to co-sponsor it.


Acting again without a vote, the Assembly then adopted, as orally corrected, the draft resolution on implementation of Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development.


It then adopted, also without a vote, the draft decision on a document relating to actions taken in organizing activities of the International Decade for Action, “Water for Life”, 2005-2015.


That action was followed by the Assembly’s adoption, without a vote and as orally corrected, of the draft on follow-up to and implementation of the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States.


In successive consensus actions, the Assembly then adopted two draft resolutions, the first relating to the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, and the second on natural disasters and vulnerability.


Taking up a draft resolution on protection of the global climate for present and future generations of mankind, the Assembly then adopted operative paragraph 7 of that text by a recorded vote of 170 in favour to 2 against (Japan, United States), with 1 abstention (Israel).  It then adopted the text as a whole without a vote.  (See Annex IV.)


Acting again without a vote, the Assembly adopted the text on sustainable mountain development.


The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, the draft resolution on promotion of new and renewable sources of energy, including the implementation of the World Solar Programme.


By a recorded vote of 54 in favour to 33 against, with 68 abstentions, the Assembly then adopted preambular paragraph 4 of the draft on the International Year of Deserts and Desertification, 2006.  (See Annex V.)


The representatives of Brazil and Myanmar said their votes in favour of that preambular paragraph had not been reflected on the board.


It then adopted preambular paragraph 7 of the desertification draft by a recorded vote of 97 in favour to 27 against, with 25 abstentions, before adopting, the entire text by a recorded vote of 120 in favour to 1 against (Syria), with 47 abstentions.  (See Annexes VI and VII respectively.)

Speaking after those actions, the representative of the United States said he had abstained because the text, which should have been a positive measure, had been flawed by the politicizing of preambular paragraph 4, relating to Palestinian lands, and preambular paragraph 7 regarding an international conference to be hosted by Israel.


The representative of Israel said that the language in preambular paragraph 7, regarding the conference that his country would hold, made clear that it was being held in support of the upcoming International Year.  It was regrettable that one party had rejected such an important initiative for political reasons.  Those who had voted in favour of the resolution had sent a strong message supporting measures contained in the resolution.


The representative of Syria said he had voted against the resolution because of the politicization of the text by one party, and because the text was unacceptable.  It was hypocritical of Israel to hold a conference on desertification while it was destroying the desert with its tanks and settlement activities, as well as nuclear activities.  The sovereignty of the Palestinian people had been affirmed, as had their sovereign right to resources on their property.  The insertion of the paragraph on Israel’s destruction of Palestinian resources was appropriate and a conference on the issue would be held in Algeria.


The representative of Guatemala said preambular paragraph 4 on Israel’s destruction of land was irrelevant to the resolution.   Guatemala had voted for the earlier resolution regarding the Palestinian people and their sovereign right to their natural resources.  The issue belonged in that resolution and was out of place in the present text.


The representative of the Sudan said he had voted “yes” on paragraph 7, but had intended to vote “no”.  He had abstained on the resolution as a whole.


The representative of Saudi Arabia said he supported paragraph 4, but was against paragraph 7.  That should be clarified in the record.


The representative of Colombia said he had voted in favour of paragraph 4, but it appeared as an abstention.


The representative of Qatar said he did not have the text in Arabic and would have voted “no” on paragraph 7.


The representative of Namibia said she had missed the vote.


The representative of Nigeria said that while his country was committed to the International Year, he had abstained from voting on paragraph 4, but that did not mean he had shifted position on the question of Israel and Palestine -- the two should exist side by side as equals.


The Observer for Palestine said it was regrettable that consensus could not be reached on a resolution of such importance.  The Palestinian vote against the paragraph referring to the conference in Israel was not a political statement but rather a balancing out of an imbalanced resolution.  The same applied to the Arab Group’s sponsorship of paragraph 4.  The Palestinian position was a matter of principle and not a political attitude.


By a recorded vote of 168 in favour to 2 against (Japan, United States), and no abstentions, the Assembly then adopted operative paragraph 18 of the draft on implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa  .(See Annex VIII.)


Following that action, the representative of Paraguay said she had missed the vote.


Acting without a vote, the Assembly then approved the draft as a whole.


It then adopted, without a vote and as orally corrected, the draft resolution on the Convention on Biological Diversity.


The Assembly then took up the Second Committee’s report on implementation of the outcome of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT), adopting the related draft without a vote.


Turning to the Committee’s report on globalization and interdependence (document A/60/490, Add.1-4)), which contained five draft resolutions, the Assembly adopted, without a vote, the draft on the role of the United Nations in promoting development in the context of globalization and interdependence.


It then adopted, again without a vote, the draft on science and technology for development.


The Assembly then postponed action on the draft resolution relating to international migration and development, so as to allow for a review of its programme budget implications.


Taking up the draft resolution on facilitation and reduction of the cost of migrant remittance transfers, the Assembly then adopted that text, without a vote, as orally corrected.


It then adopted, also without a vote, the draft on preventing and combating corrupt practices and transfer of funds of illicit origin and returning such assets, in particular to the countries of origin, consistent with the United Nations Convention against Corruption.


The Assembly then took up the Committee’s report on groups of countries in special situations (document A/60/491/Add.1-2 and Corr.1), which contained two draft resolutions.  It postponed action on the text concerning the Third United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries:  high-level meeting on the midterm comprehensive global review of the implementation of the Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2001-2010, so as to allow a review of its programme budget implications.


Next, the Assembly adopted, without a vote, the draft on specific actions related to the particular needs and problems of landlocked developing countries:  outcome of the International Ministerial Conference of Landlocked and Transit Developing Countries and Donor Countries and International Financial and Development Institutions on Transit Transport Cooperation.


Taking up the Committee’s report on eradication of poverty and other development issues (document A/60/492, Add.1-3), the Assembly adopted without a vote, the text on implementation of the first United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty.


Acting again without a vote, it adopted the draft on women in development.


Following that action, the observer for the Holy See said he did not interpret language in preambular paragraph 2 or language in any other paragraphs of that draft to represent support for abortion.


The representative of Nicaragua said the paragraph referring to reproductive and sexual health should be seen in the context of earlier definitions.


The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, the draft on human resources development.


It then turned to the Committee’s report on operational activities for development (document A/60/493 and Add.1-2), adopting the draft decision contained in it by a recorded vote of 172 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with no abstentions.  (See Annex IX.)


Acting without a vote, it adopted, as orally corrected, the text on South-South Cooperation.


Next, the Assembly took up the Committee’s report on training and research (document A/60/494, Add.1-2), adopting the texts relating to the United Nations Institute for Training and Research and the United Nations System Staff College in Turin, Italy, both without a vote.


The Assembly then took up the Committee’s report entitled “Towards global partnerships” (document A/60/495), adopting a related draft without a vote.


The representative of Nigeria said his delegation was not a co-sponsor of the resolution, but wished to place on the record the fact that it supported the text.


Turning to the Committee’s report on strengthening of the Coordination of Humanitarian and Disaster Relief Assistance, including Special Economic Assistance to Individual Countries or Regions (document A/60/496 and Corr.1), the Assembly then adopted, without a vote, the resolutions on:  international cooperation and coordination for the human and ecological rehabilitation and economic development of Kazakhstan’s Semipalatinsk region; economic assistance for the reconstruction and development of Djibouti (as orally corrected); humanitarian assistance and rehabilitation for Ethiopia; assistance for humanitarian relief and the economic and social rehabilitation of Somalia; and humanitarian assistance and reconstruction for El Salvador and Guatemala.


The representative of the United States said he regretted that the language in operative paragraph 5 of the Djibouti text did not conform to that of its negotiations, or that normally used in resolutions dealing with relationships between the United Nations and the Bretton Woods institutions.  Governing bodies determined the actions of those institutions, and the United Nations could not instruct their movements.


Finally, the Assembly took up the Committee’s report on revitalization of the work of the General Assembly (document A/60/497), adopting, without a vote, a draft decision on the draft programme of work of the Second Committee for the sixty-first session of the General Assembly.


The Assembly then decided to postpone action on a draft resolution relating to implementation of the Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS, so as to allow for a review of its programme budget implications.


(annexes follow)


ANNEX I


Vote on Permanent Sovereignty over Natural Resources


The draft resolution on permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources (document A/60/484) was adopted by a recorded vote of 156 in favour to 6 against, with
8 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Australia, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Nauru, Papua New Guinea, Tuvalu.


Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Grenada, Honduras, Kiribati, Malawi, Niger, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Solomon Islands, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Vanuatu.


(END OF ANNEX I)


ANNEX II


Vote on International Trade and Development


Draft resolution I on international trade and development (document A/60/486/Add.1) was adopted by a recorded vote of 121 in favour to 1 against, with 51 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom.


Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Honduras, Kiribati, Nauru, Niger, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Vanuatu.


(END OF ANNEX II)


ANNEX III


Vote on Unilateral Economic Measures


Draft resolution II on unilateral economic measures as a means of political and economic coercion against developing countries (document A/60/486/Add.1) was adopted by a recorded vote of 120 in favour to 1 against, with 50 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom.


Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gabon, Gambia, Honduras, Kiribati, Nauru, Niger, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Vanuatu.


(END OF ANNEX III)


ANNEX IV


Vote on Operative Paragraph of Draft on Protection of Global Climate


Operative paragraph 7 of the draft resolution on protection of the global climate for present and future generations of mankind (document A/60/488/Add.4) was adopted by a recorded vote of 170 in favour to 2 against, with 1 abstention, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Japan, United States.


Abstain:  Israel.


Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Honduras, Italy, Kiribati, Nauru, Niger, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Vanuatu.


(END OF ANNEX IV)


ANNEX V


Vote on Preambular Paragraph 4 on Desertification


Preambular paragraph 4 of the draft resolution on the International Year of Deserts and Desertification, 2006 (document A/60/488/Add.7) was adopted by a recorded vote of 54 in favour to 33 against, with 68 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belize, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, China, Comoros, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Egypt, Ethiopia, Fiji, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Libya, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Philippines, Qatar, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Australia, Bulgaria, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Germany, Guatemala, Hungary, Iceland, Israel, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Marshall Islands, Namibia, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Andorra, Argentina, Austria, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Benin, Bolivia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Finland, France, Georgia, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, India, Ireland, Jamaica, Kenya, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Spain, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay.


Absent:  Bhutan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Honduras, Italy, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Madagascar, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.


(END OF ANNEX V)


ANNEX VI


Vote on Preambular Paragraph 7 on Desertification


Preambular paragraph 7 of the draft resolution on the International Year of Deserts and Desertification, 2006 (document A/60/488/Add.7) was adopted by a recorded vote of 97 in favour to 27 against, with 25 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Albania, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burundi, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Kenya, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sudan, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay.


Against:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei Darussalam, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritania, Morocco, Namibia, Pakistan, Senegal, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe


Abstain:  Belarus, Benin, Bhutan, Cameroon, China, Colombia, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Dominican Republic, Egypt, Ghana, Guyana, Haiti, India, Jamaica, Jordan, Liberia, Mali, Nepal, Nicaragua, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Venezuela.


Absent:  Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Honduras, Italy, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Madagascar, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Oman, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia., Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Suriname, Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Viet Nam.


(END OF ANNEX VI)


ANNEX VII


Vote on International Year of Deserts


Draft resolution I on the International Year of Deserts and Desertification, 2006 (document A/60/488/Add.7) was adopted by a recorded vote of 120 in favour to 1 against, with 47 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cyprus, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, France, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, India, Iraq, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Syria.


Abstain:  Albania, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cuba, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, Georgia, Germany, Guinea, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Latvia, Lebanon, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Marshall Islands, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, United Kingdom, United States.


Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Honduras, Iran, Italy, Kiribati, Nauru, Niger, Panama, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Vanuatu.


(END OF ANNEX VII)


ANNEX VIII


Vote on Operative Paragraph 18 of Desertification Convention


Operative paragraph 18 of draft resolution II on implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa (document A/60/488/Add.7) was adopted by a recorded vote of 168 in favour to 2 against, with no abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Japan, United States.


Abstain:  None.


Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Honduras, Italy, Kiribati, Nauru, Niger, Palau, Panama, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Vanuatu.


(END OF ANNEX VIII)


ANNEX IX


Vote on Operational Activities


The draft decision on operational activities for development of the United Nations system (document A/60/493/Add.1) was adopted by a recorded vote of 172 in favour to 1 against, with no abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Abstain:  None.


Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Honduras, Italy, Kiribati, Nauru, Niger, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Somalia, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Vanuatu.


* *** *


__________


*     Press Release GA/10439 of 20 December should be 66th & 67th Meetings.



For information media • not an official record