08/12/2005
General Assembly
GA/10430

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixtieth General Assembly

Plenary

61st & 62nd Meetings (AM & PM)


GENERAL ASSEMBLY ADOPTS PROTOCOL EXPANDING LEGAL PROTECTION FOR WORKERS


PROVIDING EMERGENCY HUMANITARIAN AID, DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE


Approves Budgets for Democratic Republic of Congo , Sudan Missions;

Acts on Texts Recommended by Disarmament, Special Political Committees


Wrapping up the work of three of its Main Committees, the General Assembly today adopted a range of texts on legal matters, disarmament and decolonization, highlighted by its decision to expand legal protection for United Nations non-peacekeeping personnel -- from those involved in emergency humanitarian assistance to peacebuilding and the delivery of political and development assistance. 


Acting on the recommendation of its Sixth Committee (Legal), the Assembly adopted the Optional Protocol to the 1994 Convention on Safety of United Nations and Associated Personnel which covers peacekeeping operations, broadening its scope to include United Nations and other staff delivering emergency aid or providing assistance in peacebuilding.  It sets out the duties of States Parties and says the Protocol will be open for signature at Headquarters for 12 months from 16 January 2006. 


The decision was immediately welcomed by Secretary-General Kofi Annan and Assembly President Jan Eliasson.  Mr. Annan, who was present at the adoption, told delegations that the United Nations continued to face a security environment of “unprecedented risk”, and he thanked them for supporting efforts to improve the overall security environment and the security management system.  “Without security, our work for the peoples around the world suffers”, he added, urging all Member States to become party to the new Protocol.


Assembly President Eliasson of Sweden said the Protocol, once in force, would expand the scope of protection to additional categories of field operations to cover personnel who continued to face serious threats to their security, including hostage-taking, physical assault and robbery, in carrying out their duties.  It would effectively help to protect and boost the morale of those United Nations and associated personnel who risk their lives to serve the vulnerable and the needy of the world, he added.


Acting on other Sixth Committee texts, the Assembly decided that the Ad Hoc Committee on Terrorism would reconvene from 27 February to 3 March 2006, to resume its elaboration of the draft comprehensive convention against international terrorism, and would notify the Assembly during its current session in the event the instrument is concluded.  The resolution called on the Ad Hoc Committee to expedite its work, including its consideration of convening a high-level United Nations conference to formulate a joint organized response on all aspects of terrorism.  The Assembly also adopted the Committee’s provisional work programme for the sixty-first session.


In other action, the Assembly approved the allocation, recommended by its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary), of some $222.03 million for the financing of the United Nations Mission in the Sudan (UNMIS), for the period from 1 July 2004 to 30 June 2005.  For the period from 1 July 2005 to 30 June 2006, it appropriated some $969.47 million, inclusive of the $315.98 million previously authorized by the Assembly under the terms of its resolution 59/292 for the period from 1 July to 31 October 2005.  The Assembly also appropriated some $1.13 billion for the United Nations Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC), for the period from 1 July 2005 to 30 June 2006.


Acting on the recommendation of its Disarmament Committee, in the wake of the failure of two major opportunities this year to advance the twin goals of nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation -- the Review Conference of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and the September World Summit -- the Assembly adopted 59 draft texts.


The growing spectre of nuclear proliferation and the slow pace of nuclear disarmament prompted the submission this year of several new drafts and the substantial revision of some traditional ones.  The 34 recorded votes, including several on separate provisions, reflected divisions over how best to enhance global security.  Two texts in particular demonstrated the opposing viewpoints –- one on the need for compliance with nuclear non-proliferation agreements and the other urging pursuit of agreed nuclear disarmament obligations.


By the text on compliance, the Assembly stressed that failure to comply with non-proliferation, arms limitation and disarmament agreements, not only adversely affected the security of States parties, but could also create security risks for other States relying on the constraints and commitments stipulated in those agreements.  It urged those States not currently in compliance with their obligations to make the strategic decision to come back into compliance. 


Emphasizing nuclear disarmament in the other text, the Assembly expressed grave concern over the failure of the 2005 Review Conference of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty to reach any substantive agreement on the follow-up of the nuclear disarmament obligations.  It called for practical steps, as agreed in 2000, to be taken by all nuclear-weapon States, leading to nuclear disarmament in a way that promoted global stability. 


In another new draft, the Assembly expressed deep concern over the risk that terrorists might use radioactive materials in radiological dispersion devices.  It called on Member States to support global efforts to prevent and, if necessary, suppress the acquisition and use by terrorists of radioactive materials.  It also urged them to take and strengthen national measures to prevent terrorists’ acquisition and use of radioactive materials, as well a terrorist attacks on nuclear plants and facilities which would result in radioactive releases.


A new resolution on ballistic missile proliferation had the Assembly express concern about the increasing regional and global security challenges caused by, among other things, the proliferation of ballistic missiles capable of delivering weapons of mass destruction.  It welcomed the Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation.  A decision on ballistic missiles would ensure inclusion of the item on the provisional agenda of the Assembly’s next session. 


Also today, the Assembly adopted an international instrument on marking and tracing illicit small arms and light weapons.  Consensus was achieved in June on a text, which defined its purpose as, among other things, facilitating international cooperation and assistance in marking and tracing and complementing existing agreements to prevent, combat, and eradicate the illicit small arms trade, while not restricting States’ right to retain those arms for their self-defence and security needs, or for their participation in peacekeeping operations. 


Acting without a vote, the Assembly reaffirmed the mandate of the Disarmament Commission as the specialized, deliberative body within the United Nations multilateral disarmament machinery, and asked it to meet from 10 to 28 April 2006.  Before action on that text, the United States’ representative said her delegation would not be participating in the vote.


Acting on the recommendation of its Fourth Committee (Special Political and Decolonization), the General Assembly adopted 25 resolutions, 15 by recorded votes, and three draft decisions on a wide range of agenda items, including decolonization, information, mine-action assistance, the effects of atomic radiation, peacekeeping, the work of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA), and Israeli practices in the occupied Arab Territories.


Taking action on 12 decolonization texts (seven by recorded votes), the Assembly adopted by consensus a resolution on the question of Tokelau, by which it noted that the legislative branch of that Non-Self-Governing Territory had decided to hold a referendum on self-government.  Also by consensus, the Assembly adopted resolutions on the question of Western Sahara, as well as on several small island Territories; and a decision on the question of Gibraltar.  Among the texts adopted by recorded votes was one on the implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples, and one on the Second International Decade for the Eradication of Colonialism (Annexes XXXV through XLIX).


On the operations of UNRWA, the Assembly adopted five texts, four by recorded votes (Annexes XXXV through XXXVIII), including one by which it affirmed that the Agency’s functioning remained essential in all fields of operation, calling on Israel to take measures to protect UNRWA personnel and facilities, and to cease obstructing its work.


Taking up five draft resolutions on Israeli practices affecting the human rights of the Palestinian and other Arab peoples in occupied lands, the Assembly adopted a text on Israeli settlements, by a recorded vote of153 in favour to 7 against (Australia, Federated States of Micronesia, Grenada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States), with 10 abstentions (Albania, Cameroon, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Haiti, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Uganda).  By that action it reaffirmed that settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and the occupied Syrian Golan, were illegal.  It welcomed the Israeli withdrawal from the Gaza Strip and parts of the northern West Bank, and the dismantlement of settlements there, as a step towards the implementation of the “Road Map”.


Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted two resolutions and one decision on questions relating to information.  It also adopted resolutions on:  assistance in mine action; the effects of atomic radiation; and international cooperation in the peaceful uses of outer space.  In other action, the Assembly took note of the Fourth Committee’s reports on its comprehensive review of peacekeeping operations and on the revitalization of the General Assembly’s work.


The Assembly also extended the work of its Second Committee (Economic and Financial) until Friday, 9 December, and of its Fifth Committee until Thursday, 22 December.  In light of those decisions, and the amount of work remaining for the plenary, the Assembly also postponed the date of the closing of its sixtieth session from 13 December to 22 December.


The Assembly will reconvene at a time and date to be announced.


Background


The General Assembly met this morning to take action on the draft resolutions and decisions recommended by its First Committee (Disarmament and International Security) and Fourth Committee (Special Political and Decolonization), as well as several reports from its Fifth (Administrative and Budgetary) and Sixth (Legal) Committees.


First Committee


A draft resolution on objective information on military matters, including transparency of military expenditures (document A/60/451) would call on Member States to report annually, by 30 April, to the Secretary-General their military expenditures for the latest fiscal year for which data are available, using, preferably and to the extent possible, the reporting instrument as recommended in its resolution 35/142 B or, as appropriate, any other format developed in conjunction with similar reporting on military expenditures to other international or regional organizations, and, in the same context, encourage Member States to submit nil returns, if appropriate.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 25 October without a vote.


A draft resolution on developments in the field of information and telecommunications in the context of international security (document A/60/452), tabled by the Russian Federation, would have the Assembly call upon Member States to promote further at multilateral levels the consideration of existing and potential threats in the field of information security, as well as possible measures to limit the threats emerging in this field, consistent with the need to preserve the free flow of information.


By further terms, the Assembly would request the Secretary-General, with the assistance of a group of governmental experts, to be established in 2009 on the basis of equitable geographical discrimination, to continue to study existing and potential threats in the sphere of information security and possible cooperative measures to address them and to submit a report on the results of this study to the General Assembly at its sixty-fifth session.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 28 October by a vote of 163 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with no abstentions.


The General Assembly, determined to prevent the emergence of new types of weapons of mass destruction that have characteristics comparable in destructive effect to those of weapons of mass destruction as identified in the definition of weapons of mass destruction adopted by the United Nations in 1948, would reaffirm that effective measures should be taken to prevent the emergence of new types of weapons of mass destruction, according to a new resolution entitled “Prohibition of the development and manufacture of new types of weapons of mass destruction and new systems of such weapons:  report of the Conference on Disarmament” (document A/60/453).


The Assembly would request the Conference on Disarmament, without prejudice to further overview of its agenda, to keep the matter under review, with a view to making, when necessary, recommendations on undertaking specific negotiations on identified types of such weapons.  It would call upon all States immediately following any such recommendations to give favourable consideration to those recommendations.  It would also decide to include the item in the provisional agenda of its sixty-third session.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 24 October by a vote of 150 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 1 abstention ( Israel).


In a separate area of consideration, according to a draft resolution submitted by the Chairman on the question of Antarctica (document A/60/454), the Assembly would reaffirm its conviction that, in the interest of all mankind, Antarctica should continue forever to be used exclusively for peaceful purposes and that it should not become the scene or object of international discord.


The Assembly would welcome the practice whereby the Antarctic Treaty consultative parties regularly provide the Secretary-General with information on their consultative meetings and on their activities in Antarctica, and encourages the parties to continue to provide the Secretary-General and interested States with information on developments in relation to Antarctica, and requests the Secretary-General to submit a report which shall consist of that information to the General Assembly at its sixty-third session.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 1 November, without a vote.


According to a draft resolution on implementation of the Declaration of the Indian Ocean as a Zone of Peace (document A/60/455), the Assembly would reiterate its conviction that the participation of all permanent members of the Security Council and the major maritime users of the Indian Ocean in the work of the ad hoc committee is important and would greatly facilitate the development of a mutually beneficial dialogue to advance peace, security and stability in the Indian Ocean region.


The Assembly would request the Secretary-General to continue to render, within existing resources, all necessary assistance to the ad hoc committee, including the provision of summary records.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 26 October by a vote of 121 in favour to 3 against ( France, United Kingdom, United States), with 44 abstentions.


Under the terms of a draft resolution (document A/60/456), the Assembly would call on African States that had not yet done so to sign and ratify the African Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone Treaty (Treaty of Pelindaba) as soon as possible, so that it may enter into force without delay.  The Assembly would also call on the African State parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) that have not yet done so to conclude comprehensive safeguards agreements with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) pursuant to the Treaty, thereby satisfying requirements of article 9 (b) of and annex II to the Treaty of Pelindaba when it enters into force.  It also called on those States to conclude additional protocols to their safeguards agreements on the basis of the Model Protocol approved by the Agency’s Board of Governors on 15 May 1997.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 28 October without a vote.


A draft on the consolidation of the regime established by the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (Treaty of Tlatelolco) (document A/60/457) would have the Assembly welcome the fact that the Treaty was now in force for the sovereign States of the region, and that that fact was officially acknowledged by the General Conference of the Agency for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean at it eighteenth session in Havana, Cuba, on 5 and 6 November 2003.


The Assembly would urge the countries of the region that have not yet done so to ratify the Treaty’s amendments, which were approved by the General Conference of the Agency in its resolutions 267 (E-V), 268 (XII) and 290 (E-VII).


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 24 October without a vote.


According to a draft resolution on the role of science and technology in the context of international security and disarmament (document A/60/459), the Assembly would invite Member States to undertake additional efforts to apply science and technology for disarmament-related purposes and to make disarmament-related technologies available to interested States.


By further terms, the Assembly would urge Member States to undertake multilateral negotiations with the participation of all interested States in order to establish universally acceptable, non-discriminatory guidelines for international transfers of dual-use goods and technologies and high technology with military applications.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 24 October by a vote of 88 in favour to 49 against, with 13 abstentions.


A draft resolution on the establishment of a nuclear-weapon-free zone in the region of the Middle East (document A/60/460) would have the Assembly urge all parties directly concerned to consider seriously taking the practical and urgent steps required for the establishment of such a zone in the Middle East in accordance with the relevant General Assembly resolutions.  To promote that objective, the Assembly would invite those countries concerned not to develop, produce, test or otherwise acquire nuclear weapons or permit the stationing on their territories, or territories under their control, of nuclear weapons or nuclear-explosive devices.  It would also call upon countries of the region that had not done so, pending the establishment of the zone, to agree to place all their nuclear activities under IAEA safeguards.


By further terms, the Assembly would invite all countries of the region, pending the establishment of such a zone, to declare their support for it, and to deposit those declarations with the Security Council.  A related provision would have the Assembly invite nuclear-weapon States and all other States to assist in the zone’s establishment, and to refrain from any action that ran counter to both the letter and the spirit of the resolution.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 24 October without a vote.


Convinced that nuclear weapons pose the greatest threat to mankind and to the survival of civilization, the Assembly would reaffirm the urgent need to reach an early agreement on effective international arrangements to assure non-nuclear-weapon States against the use or threat of use of nuclear weapons, according to another draft text (document A/60/461).


The Assembly would appeal to all States, especially the nuclear-weapon States, to work actively towards an early agreement on a common approach and, in particular, on a common formula that could be included in an international instrument of a legally binding character.  It would recommend that further intensive efforts be devoted to the search for such a common approach or common formula, and that the various alternative approaches, including, in particular, those considered in the Conference on Disarmament, be explored further in order to overcome the difficulties.


The Assembly would further recommend that the Conference on Disarmament actively continue intensive negotiations with a view to reaching early agreement and concluding effective international arrangements on such assurances, taking into account the widespread support for the conclusion of an international convention and giving consideration to any other proposals designed to secure the same objective.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 24 October by 98 in favour to none against, with 55 abstentions.


Recognizing that prevention of an outer space arms race would avert a grave danger for international peace and security, the General Assembly would call upon all States, in particular those with major space capabilities, to contribute actively to the objective of the peaceful use of outer space and of the prevention of an arms race in outer space, and to refrain from actions contrary to that objective and to the relevant existing treaties in the interest of maintaining international peace and security and promoting international cooperation, under another draft resolution (document A/60/462).


The Assembly would reaffirm its recognition that the legal regime applicable to outer space did not, in and of itself, guarantee the prevention of an arms race in outer space, that the regime played a significant role in the prevention of an arms race in that environment, that there was a need to consolidate and reinforce that regime and enhance its effectiveness, and that it was important to comply strictly with existing agreements, both bilateral and multilateral.


In a related term, the Assembly would reiterate that the Conference on Disarmament had the primary role in the negotiation of a multilateral agreement or agreements on the prevention of an outer space arms race in all its aspects.


The Assembly would, thus, invite the Conference to complete the examination and updating of the mandate contained in its decision of 13 February 1992, and to establish an ad hoc committee as early as possible during its 2006 session.  It would urge States conducting activities in outer space, as well as States interested in conducting such activities, to keep the Conference on Disarmament informed of the progress of bilateral and multilateral negotiations on the matter, if any, so as to facilitate its work.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 25 October by a vote of 160 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 1 abstention ( Israel).


According to a draft resolution on compliance with non-proliferation arms limitation and agreements (document A/60/463 I), the General Assembly would underscore the contribution that compliance with non-proliferation, arms limitation and disarmament agreements and other agreed obligations makes to enhancing confidence and strengthening security and stability.  It would also urge those States not currently in compliance with their obligations to make the strategic decision to come back into compliance.


By a further term of the text, the Assembly would call on all Member States to take concerted action to encourage, through bilateral and multilateral means, the compliance by all States with their respective non-proliferation, arms limitation and disarmament agreements and other agreed obligations, and to hold those not in compliance with such agreements accountable for their non-compliance in a manner consistent with the United Nations Charter.


The Assembly would encourage efforts by all States parties, the United Nations and other international organizations to take action, consistent with the Charter, to prevent serious damage to international security and stability arising from non-compliance by States with their existing non-proliferation, arms limitation and disarmament obligations.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 31 October by a vote of 137 in favour to none against, with 11 abstentions.


Noting the growing concern at the lack of implementation of binding obligations and agreed steps towards nuclear disarmament, the Assembly would call on all States to comply fully with commitments made regarding nuclear disarmament and nuclear non-proliferation, and not to act in any way that may be detrimental to either cause or that may lead to a new nuclear arms race, according to a draft resolution entitled Towards a nuclear-weapon-free world:  accelerating the implementation of nuclear disarmament commitments (document A/60/463 II).


The Assembly would also call on all States to spare no efforts to achieve universal adherence to the NPT, and would urge India, Israel and Pakistan, which were not yet parties to the Treaty, to accede to it as non-nuclear-weapon States promptly and without conditions.  By a further term, the Assembly would call on the nuclear-weapon States to accelerate the implementation of the practical steps towards nuclear disarmament that were agreed upon at the 2000 NPT Review Conference.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 26 October by a vote of 144 in favour to 5 against ( France, India, Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 19 abstentions.


Prior to approval of the draft as a whole, a separate recorded vote was taken on operative paragraph 4, which calls on States parties to spare no effort to achieve the universality of the NPT, and urges India, Israel and Pakistan to accede to it as non-nuclear-weapon States promptly and without conditions.  The Committee voted to retain that provision by 148 in favour to 3 against (India, Israel, Pakistan), with 9 abstentions (Australia, Bhutan, Cameroon, Federated States of Micronesia, Indonesia, Jamaica, Mauritius, United Kingdom, United States).


Under the terms of a draft decision on Missiles (document A/60/463), the Assembly would decide to include in the provisional agenda of its sixty-first session the item entitled “Missiles”.


The Committee approved the draft decision on 24 October by a vote of 101 in favour to 2 against ( Israel, United States), with 50 abstentions.


A draft decision on the establishment of a nuclear-weapon-free zone in Central Asia (document A/60/463) would have the Assembly decide to include the item in the provisional agenda of its sixty-first session.


The Committee approved the draft decision on 24 October, without a vote.


According to a draft resolution on the prohibition of the dumping of radioactive wastes (document A/60/463 III), the Assembly would express grave concern regarding any use of nuclear wastes that would constitute radiological warfare and have grave implications for the national security of all States.


Upon further terms, the Assembly would call upon States to take appropriate measures with a view to preventing any dumping of nuclear or radioactive wastes that would infringe upon the sovereignty of States, and it would appeal to all Member States that had not yet taken the necessary steps to become party to the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management to do so as soon as possible.  The Assembly would request the Conference on Disarmament to take into account, in the negotiations for a convention on the prohibition of radiological weapons, radioactive wastes as part of the scope of such a convention.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 24 October, without a vote.


Under a draft decision on a United Nations conference to identify ways of eliminating nuclear dangers in the context of disarmament (document A/60/463), the Assembly would decide to include the item in the provisional agenda of its sixty-first session.


The Committee approved the draft decision on 24 October by a vote of 108 in favour to 5 against ( France, Israel, Poland, United Kingdom, United States), with 39 abstentions.


Determined to pursue the total elimination of nuclear weapons and to contribute to the prevention of their proliferation, the General Assembly would affirm its conviction of the important role of nuclear-weapon-free zones in strengthening the nuclear non-proliferation regime and in extending the areas of the world that are nuclear-weapon free, according to a revised draft resolution on a nuclear-weapon-free southern hemisphere (document A/60/463 IV).


With particular reference to the responsibilities of the nuclear-weapon States, the Assembly would call on all States to support the process of nuclear disarmament and to work for the total elimination of all nuclear weapons.  It would call upon all concerned States to work together to facilitate adherence to the protocols to nuclear-weapon-free-zone treaties by all relevant States that have not yet done so.  The Assembly would welcome the steps taken to conclude further nuclear-weapon-free zone treaties on the basis of arrangements freely arrived at among the States of the region concerned, and call on all States to consider all relevant proposals, including those reflected in its resolutions on the establishment of nuclear-weapon-free zones in the Middle East and South Asia.


In three separate recorded votes, the Committee approved the draft resolution on establishing a nuclear-weapon-free southern hemisphere.  It voted to retain operative paragraph 5 as a whole, by which the Assembly would welcome steps taken to conclude further nuclear-weapon-free-zone treaties, and call on all States to consider all relevant proposals, including those reflected in its resolution on establishing such zones in the Middle East and South Asia.  The vote was 141 in favour to 1 against ( India), with 9 abstentions ( Bhutan, France, Israel, Pakistan, Russian Federation, Spain, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, United Kingdom, United States).


Prior to approving the paragraph as a whole, it voted to retain the three words “and South Asia” by a vote of 140 in favour to 2 against (India, Pakistan), with 7 abstentions (Bhutan, France, Israel, Russian Federation, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, United Kingdom, United States).


The Committee approved the draft as a whole by a vote of 144 in favour to 3 against ( France, United Kingdom, United States), with 6 abstentions ( Bhutan, India, Israel, Pakistan, Russian Federation, Spain).


Concerned at the continuous erosion of multilateralism in the field of arms regulation, non-proliferation and disarmament and recognition that a resort to unilateral actions by Member States in resolving their security concerns would jeopardize international peace and security, a draft resolution would have the Assembly urge the participation of all interested States in multilateral negotiations on arms regulation, non-proliferation and disarmament in a non-discriminatory and transparent manner (document A/60/463 V).


The Assembly would call once again upon Member States to renew and fulfil their individual and collective commitments to multilateral cooperation as an important means of pursuing and achieving their common objectives in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation.


It would request the States parties to the relevant instruments on weapons of mass destruction to consult and cooperate among themselves in resolving their concerns with regard to cases of non-compliance, as well as on implementation, in accordance with the procedures defined in those instruments, and to refrain from resorting or threatening to resort to unilateral actions or directing unverified non-compliance accusations against one another to resolve their concerns.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 26 October by a vote of 116 in favour to 6 against (Albania, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Latvia, United Kingdom, United States), with 48 abstentions.


Under a draft resolution on observance of environmental norms in the drafting and implementation of agreements on disarmament and arms control (document A/60/463 VI), the Assembly would call upon Member States to adopt unilateral, bilateral, regional and multilateral measures so as to contribute to ensuring the application of scientific and technological progress within the framework of international security, disarmament and other related spheres, without detriment to the environment or to its effective contribution to attaining sustainable development.


It would reaffirm that international disarmament forums should take fully into account the relevant environmental norms in negotiating treaties and agreements on disarmament and arms limitation, and that all States, through their actions, should contribute fully to ensuring compliance with the aforementioned norms in the implementation of treaties and conventions to which they are parties.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 26 October by a vote of 167 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 3 abstentions ( France, Israel, United Kingdom).


According to a draft resolution on the relationship between disarmament and development (document A/60/463 VII), the Assembly would urge the international community to devote part of the resources made available by the implementation of disarmament and arms limitation agreements to economic and social development, with a view to reducing the ever-widening gap between developed and developing countries.


Stressing the importance of the symbiotic relationship between disarmament and development and the important role of security in this connection, and concerned with increasing global military expenditure, which could otherwise be spent on development needs, the Assembly would stress the central role of the United Nations in the disarmament-development relationship, and request the Secretary-General to strengthen further the role of the Organization in this field, in particular the high-level Steering Group on Disarmament and Development, in order to assure continued and effective coordination and close cooperation between the relevant United Nations departments, agencies and sub-agencies.


The Assembly would encourage the international community to achieve the Millennium Development Goals and to make reference to the contribution that disarmament could provide in meeting them when it reviewed its progress towards this purpose in 2006, as well as to make greater efforts to integrate disarmament, humanitarian and development activities.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 28 October by a vote of 164 in favour to 1 against ( United States) with 2 abstentions ( France, Israel).


A draft decision entitled Convening of the fourth special session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament (document A/60/463) would have the Assembly decide to include that item on the provisional agenda of its sixty-first session.


The Committee approved the draft decision on 26 October, without a vote.


Concerned about the increasing regional and global security challenges caused by, among other things, the proliferation of ballistic missiles capable of delivering weapons of mass destruction, the Assembly would welcome the adoption of the Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation, according to a draft resolution on the Code (document A/60/463 VIII).


The Assembly would invite all States that had not yet done so to subscribe to the Code of Conduct, and it would encourage the exploration of further ways and means to deal effectively with the problem of the proliferation of ballistic missiles capable of delivering mass destruction weapons.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 28 October by a vote of 151 in favour to 1 against ( Iran), with 11 abstentions.


The Assembly would call on States to conclude agreements, wherever possible, for nuclear non-proliferation, disarmament and confidence-building measures at the regional and subregional levels, by a draft resolution on regional disarmament (document A/60/463 IX).


Further to the text, the Assembly would stress that sustained efforts were needed, within the framework of the Conference on Disarmament and under the United Nations umbrella, to make progress on the entire range of disarmament issues.  It would support and encourage efforts aimed at promoting confidence-building measures at the regional and subregional levels to ease regional tensions and to further disarmament and nuclear non-proliferation measures at the regional and subregional levels.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 24 October, without a vote.


Concerned that the continuation of disputes among States might contribute to the arms race and endanger the maintenance of international peace and security and the efforts of the international community to promote arms control and disarmament, the Assembly would encourage the promotion of bilateral and regional confidence-building measures to avoid conflict and prevent the unintended and accidental outbreak of hostilities, by the terms of a draft text (document A/60/463 X).


A further term of the draft would have the Assembly emphasize that the objective of confidence-building measures should be to help strengthen international peace and security and be consistent with the principle of undiminished security at the lowest level of armament.


The Assembly would urge States to comply strictly with all bilateral, regional and international agreements, including arms control and disarmament agreements, to which they were party.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 24 October, without a vote.


Convinced that every effort should be made to avoid nuclear war and nuclear terrorism, the General Assembly would stress the need for a diminishing role for nuclear weapons in security policies to minimize the risk that those weapons would ever be used, and to facilitate the process of their total elimination in a way that promotes international stability, based on the principle of undiminished security for all, according to a draft resolution entitled “Renewed determination towards the total elimination of nuclear weapons” (document A/60/463 XI).


The Assembly would call for the nuclear-weapon States to further reduce the operational status of nuclear weapons systems in ways that promoted international stability, based on the principle of undiminished security for all.  It would reaffirm the importance of the universality of the NPT to comply with their obligations under all its articles, and stress the importance of an effective Treaty review process.


By a related term, the Assembly would call on States not parties to the NPT to accede to it as non-nuclear-weapon States without delay and without conditions and, pending their accession, to refrain from all acts that would defeat the Treaty’s objective and purpose, and to take practical steps in its support.


The Assembly would encourage further steps leading to nuclear disarmament, to which all States parties are committed under the NPT’s article VI, including deeper reductions in all types of nuclear weapons.  It would emphasize the importance of applying irreversibility and verifiability, as well as increased transparency in a way that promotes international stability and undiminished security for all, in the process of working towards the elimination of nuclear weapons.


It would urge all States that have not yet done so to sign and ratify the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) at the earliest opportunities with a view to its early entry into force.  It would stress the importance of maintaining existing moratoriums on nuclear-weapon test explosions pending the Treaty’s operation, and reaffirm the importance of the continued development of the CTBT’s verification regime, including the international monitoring system, which would be required to provide assurance of compliance.


Among its other terms, the text would have the Assembly:  encourage the Russian Federation and the United States to fully implement the Treaty on Strategic Offensive Reductions, which should serve as a step for further nuclear disarmament, and to undertake nuclear arms reductions beyond those provided for by the Treaty; further encourage States to pursue efforts contributing to the reduction of nuclear weapons-related materials; emphasize the importance of the immediate commencement of negotiations on a fissile material cut-off treaty and its early conclusion; and call on all nuclear-weapon States not parties to the NPT to declare moratoriums on the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons.


The Assembly would also:  call on all States to redouble their efforts to prevent and curb the proliferation of nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction and their delivery means; stress the importance of further efforts for non-proliferation, including the universalization of the Model Additional Protocol to the safeguards agreements of the IAEA; and encourage all States to undertake concrete activities to implement the recommendations in the report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations study on disarmament and non-proliferation education (document A/57/124).


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 26 October by a vote of 166 in favour to 2 against ( India, United States), with 7 abstentions ( Bhutan, China, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korean, Israel, Myanmar, Pakistan).


A new draft resolution entitled “Measures to promote transparency and confidence-building in outer space” (document A/60/463 XII) would have the Assembly invite all Member States to inform the Secretary-General before the start of the sixty-first session of their views concerning the advisability of further developing international outer space transparency and confidence-building measures in the interest of maintaining international peace and security and promoting international cooperation and the prevention of an arms race in outer space.


The Assembly would decide to include the item “Transparency and confidence-building measures in outer space activities” in its next provisional agenda.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 28 October by a vote of 158 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 1 abstention ( Israel).


According to a draft resolution on implementation of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction (Chemical Weapons Convention) (document A/60/463 XIII), the Assembly would emphasize that the Convention’s universality is fundamental to achieving its objectives and purposes.


Acknowledging progress made in implementing the action plan for the Convention’s universality, the Assembly would call on States that have not yet done so to become parties to the Convention without delay.


Underlining that the Convention and its implementation contribute to international peace and security, the Assembly would stress that the full and effective implementation of all the Convention’s provisions, including those on national implementation (article VII) and assistance and protection against chemical weapons (article X), constitute an important contribution to United Nations efforts in the global fight against terrorism.


The Assembly would also stress the importance to the Convention that all possessors of chemical weapons, chemical weapons production facilities or chemical weapons development facilities, including previously declared possessor States, should be among the States parties, and welcome progress to that end.


Stressing the importance of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in verifying compliance with the provisions of the Convention, as well as in promoting the timely and efficient accomplishment of all its objectives, the Assembly would urge all States parties to meet in full and on time their obligations under the Convention and to support the OPCW in implementing its activities.


By further terms of the text, the Assembly would urge States parties to fulfil their obligations under article VII without delay.  (Article VI covers national implementation of the Convention).  It would also reaffirm the importance of the article XI provisions relating to the economic and technological development of States parties and recall that the full, effective and non-discriminatory implementation of these provisions contributes to universality.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 24 October, without a vote.


According to a new revised text on addressing the negative humanitarian and development impact of the illicit manufacture, transfer and circulation of small arms and light weapons (document A/60/463 XIV), the Assembly would call on all States to more effectively address the humanitarian and development impact of the illicit small arms and their excessive accumulation, particularly in conflict or post-conflict situations.


The above provision includes the following steps:  developing comprehensive armed violence prevention programmes, where appropriate, integrated into national development strategies, including poverty reduction strategies; and building on States’ and international and regional organizations’ commitment to seriously consider rendering assistance, such as small arms funds, in order to support implementation of measures to prevent, combat and eradicate the illicit trade.


Also:  encouraging United Nations peacekeeping operations to address the safe storage and disposal of small arms and light weapons as an integral part of disarmament, demobilization and reintegration (DDR) programmes; systematically including national measures to regulate small arms and light weapons in longer-term post-conflict peacebuilding strategies and programmes; and ensuring that those activities take full account of women’s roles and that the needs of women and girl combatants and dependants be addressed in DDR programmes, and that the commitment to promote and protect children’s rights and welfare in armed conflict was also ensured.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 28 October by a vote of 160 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with no abstentions.


By the terms of another draft on national legislation on transfer of arms, military equipment and dual-use goods and technology (document A/60/463 XV), the Assembly would invite Member States in a position to do so, without prejudice to Security Council resolution 1540 (2004), to enact or improve national legislation, regulations and procedures to exercise effective control over the transfer of arms, military equipment and dual-use goods and technology, while ensuring that such legislation, regulations and procedures are consistent with States parties’ obligations under international treaties.


Also according to the text, Member States would be encouraged to voluntarily provide information to the Secretary-General on their national legislation, regulations and procedures on the transfer of arms, military equipment and dual-use goods and technology.  The Secretary-General would be requested to make that information accessible to Member States.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 28 October, without a vote.


Recognizing that there now exist conditions for the establishment of a world free of nuclear weapons, and stressing the need to take concrete practical steps towards achieving this goal, the Assembly would urge the nuclear-weapon States to stop immediately the qualitative improvement, development, production and stockpiling of nuclear warheads and their delivery systems in a draft entitled nuclear disarmament (document A/60/463 XVI).


The Assembly would also urge the nuclear-weapon States, as an interim measure, to de-alert and deactivate immediately their nuclear weapons and to take other concrete measures to reduce further the operational status of their nuclear-weapon States.  It would urge those States to commence plurilateral negotiations among themselves at an appropriate stage on further deep reductions of nuclear weapons as an effective nuclear disarmament measure.


It would reiterate its call upon those States to undertake the step-by-step reduction of the nuclear threat and to carry out effective nuclear disarmament measures with a view to achieving the total elimination of those weapons.


The Assembly would also call for the full and effective implementation of the 13 steps for nuclear disarmament contained in the Final Document of the 2000 NPT Review Conference.


In a related term, the Assembly would call on the nuclear-weapon States, pending the total elimination of nuclear weapons, to agree on an internationally and legally binding instrument on a joint undertaking not to be the first to use nuclear weapons.  It calls on all States to conclude an internationally and legally binding instrument on security assurances of non-use and non-threat of use of nuclear weapons against non-nuclear-weapon States.  It would also call for the early entry into force and strict observance of the CTBT.


Also according to the text, the Assembly would express regret that the 2005 Review Conference of the Parties to the NPT were unable to achieve any substantial result and that the Outcome Document of the Assembly’s recent High-Level Summit failed to make any reference to nuclear disarmament and nuclear non-proliferation.


It would also express regret that the Conference on Disarmament was unable to establish and ad hoc committee on nuclear disarmament at its 2005 session.  In that connection, it would reiterate its call on the Conference to establish, on a priority basis, an ad hoc committee to deal with nuclear disarmament early in 2005 and to commence negotiations on a phased programme of nuclear disarmament leading to the eventual total elimination of nuclear weapons. 


The Assembly would urge the Conference on Disarmament to agree on a work programme, which includes the immediate commencement of negotiations on a fissile material cut-off treaty, with a view to their conclusion within five years.


The Committee approved the draft resolution by a vote of 94 in favour to 42 against, with 17 abstentions.


Deeply concerned by the magnitude of human casualty and suffering, especially among children, caused by the illicit proliferation and use of small arms and light weapons, the Assembly would encourage the international community to support implementation of the moratorium on the importation, exportation and manufacture of small arms and light weapons in West Africa, and to extend further assistance in transforming the moratorium into a legally binding instrument, by the terms of a revised text on assistance to States for curbing the illicit traffic in small arms and light weapons and collecting them (document A/60/463 XVII).


By further terms, the Assembly would invite the Secretary-General and those States and organizations that are in a position to do so to continue to provide assistance to States for curbing the illicit traffic in small arms and collecting them.  It would also encourage the collaboration of civil society organizations in the efforts of the national commissions to combat the illicit traffic in small arms and in the implementation of the Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 28 October, without a vote.


The General Assembly, expressing grave concern over the failure of the 2005 NPT Review Conference to reach any substantive agreement on the follow-up of the nuclear disarmament obligations, would decide to establish an ad hoc committee in 2006 to review the implementation of disarmament obligations under the NPT and agreed in the 1995 and 2000 NPT Review Conferences, and to compile and submit a comprehensive report on possible practical mechanisms and strategies for complete nuclear disarmament at its sixty-second session, under the terms of a new revised draft resolution entitled “Follow-up to nuclear disarmament obligations agreed in the 1995 and 2000 Review Conferences of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons” (document A/60/463 XVIII).


The Assembly would urge the States parties to the NPT to follow up on the implementation of the nuclear disarmament obligations under the Treaty and agreed to at the 1995 Review and Extension Conference and the 2000 NPT Review Conference and its preparatory committees.


In that connection, the Assembly would call for practical steps as agreed by the 2000 NPT Review Conference to be taken by all nuclear-weapon States that would lead to nuclear disarmament in a way that promoted international stability and, based on the principle of undiminished security for all, among them:  further efforts by the nuclear-weapon States to reduce their nuclear arsenals unilaterally; increased transparency by the nuclear-weapon States with regard to nuclear weapons capabilities, and the implementation of agreements pursuant to article VI of the NPT and as a voluntary confidence-building measure to support further progress in nuclear disarmament; and the further reduction of non-strategic nuclear weapons, based on unilateral initiatives and as an integral part of the nuclear arms reduction and disarmament process.


Also:  concrete agreed measures to reduce further the operational status of nuclear weapons systems; a diminishing role for nuclear weapons in security policies, so as to minimize the risk that these weapons will ever be used and to facilitate their total elimination; and the engagement, as soon as appropriate, of all the nuclear-weapon States in the process leading to the total elimination of their nuclear weapons.


By a further term, the Assembly would note that the 2000 NPT Review Conference agreed that legally binding security assurances by the five nuclear-weapon States to the non-nuclear-weapon States parties to the Treaty strengthen the nuclear non-proliferation regime.


Prior to approving the draft as a whole, a separate vote was taken on the orally amended preambular paragraph 6, which reaffirmed the resolution on the Middle East adopted in 1995 by the NPT States parties, as well as the importance of the early realization of universal adherence to the Treaty and placement of nuclear facilities under full-scope IAEA safeguards.  The Committee retained that paragraph by a vote of 58 in favour to 54 against, with 23 abstentions.


The Committee then approved the draft resolution as a whole on 31 October by a vote of 70 in favour to 52 against, with 22 abstentions.


Deeply concerned by the threat of terrorism and the risk that terrorists may acquire, traffic or use radioactive materials or sources in radiological dispersion devices, the Assembly would call on Member States to support global efforts to prevent and, if necessary, suppress, the acquisition and the use by terrorists of radioactive materials, according to a new draft resolution entitled “Preventing the risk of radiological terrorism” (document A/60/463 XIX).


The Assembly would urge Member States to take and strengthen national measures as appropriate, to prevent, and if necessary suppress, the acquisition and the use by terrorists of radioactive materials and sources, in particular by taking effective measures to account for, secure and physically protect such high-risk materials in accordance with their international obligations.


In a related term, the Assembly would invite Member States to sign and ratify the International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 28 October by a vote of 162 in favour to none against, with no abstentions.


A draft resolution on problems arising from the accumulation of conventional ammunition stockpiles in surplus (document A/60/463 XX) would have the Assembly appeal to all interested States to determine the size and nature of their surplus stockpiles of conventional ammunition, whether they represent a security risk, if appropriate, their means of destruction, and whether external assistance is needed to eliminate this risk.


It would recognize that the security of stockpiles must be taken into consideration and that the appropriate controls with regard to the security and safety of stockpiles of conventional ammunition, explosive materials and detonating devices are indispensable at the national level, in order to eliminate the risk of explosion, pollution or diversion.


It would ask the Secretary-General to seek Member States’ views regarding the risks arising from the accumulation of conventional ammunition stockpiles in surplus and regarding national ways of strengthening controls on conventional ammunition, and to submit a report to the General Assembly at its next session.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 31 October without a vote.


A draft resolution on conventional arms control at the regional and subregional levels (document A/60/463 XXI) would have the Assembly decide to give urgent consideration to the issues involved in conventional arms control at the regional and subregional levels.


The Assembly would ask the Conference on Disarmament to consider the formulation of principles that can serve as a framework for regional conventional arms control agreements, and look forward to a report of the Conference on this subject.


By further terms, the Assembly would note with particular interest the initiatives taken in this regard in different regions of the world, in particular the commencement of consultations among a number of Latin American countries and the proposals for conventional arms control made in the context of South Asia.  It would also recognize the relevance and value of the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe, which is a cornerstone of European security.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 24 October by a vote of 147 in favour to 1 against ( India), with 1 abstention ( Bhutan).


Convinced that the continuing existence of nuclear weapons posed a threat to all humanity and that their use would have catastrophic consequences for all life on earth, the Assembly would underline, once again, the unanimous conclusion of the International Court of Justice that there existed an obligation to pursue in good faith and to bring to a conclusion negotiations leading to nuclear disarmament in all its aspects under strict and effective international control, under a draft resolution entitled Follow-up to the advisory opinion of the International Court of Justice on the Legality of the Threat or Use of Nuclear Weapons (document A/60/463 XXII).


The Assembly would call, once again, all States immediately to fulfil that obligation by commencing multilateral negotiations leading to an early conclusion of a nuclear weapons convention prohibiting the development, production, testing, deployment, stockpiling, transfer, threat or use of nuclear weapons and providing for their elimination.  It would request all States to inform the Secretary-General of the efforts and measures they have taken on the implementation of the present resolution and nuclear disarmament, and request the Secretary-General to apprise the Assembly of that information at its next session.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 24 October by a vote of 103 in favour to 29 against, with 21 abstentions.


Convinced of the importance of effective national control of transfers of man-portable air defence systems and related training and instruction materials and the safe and effective management of stockpiles of such weapons, the Assembly, under a draft resolution on prevention of the illicit transfer and unauthorized access to and use of man-portable air defence systems (document A/60/463 XXIII), would urge Member States to support current international, regional and national efforts to combat and prevent that illicit transfer and unauthorized use.


The Assembly would stress the importance of effective and comprehensive national controls on the production, stockpiling, transfer and brokering of man-portable air defence systems to prevent the illicit trade in and unauthorized access to and use of such weapons, their components and related training and instruction materials.


It would encourage Member States to enact or improve legislation, regulations, procedures and stockpile management practices and to assist other States, at their request, to exercise effective control over access to and the brokering and transfer of man-portable air defence systems to State and non-State end-users and to ensure that such weapons are exported only to Governments or agents authorized by a Government.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 28 October, without a vote.


According to a draft resolution entitled Transparency in armaments (document A/60/463 XXIV), the Assembly would reaffirm its determination to ensure the effective operation of the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms.


The Assembly would call on Member States, with a view to achieving the Register’s universal participation, to provide the Secretary-General, by 31 May, annually, with the requested data and information for the Register, including nil reports, if appropriate.


Pending the Register’s further development, the Assembly would invite Member States in a position to do so to provide additional information on procurement from national production and military holdings and to make use of the “Remarks” column in the standardized reporting form to provide additional information, such as types or models and to include transfers of small arms and light weapons, using definitions and reporting measures they deem appropriate, as part of their additional background information.


The Assembly would request the Secretary-General, with the assistance of a group of governmental experts to be convened in 2006, to prepare a report on the Register’s continuing operation and its further development, taking into account the work of the Conference on Disarmament, the views expressed by Member States and the reports of the Secretary-General on the continuing operation of the Register, and its further development, with a view to taking a decision at its sixty-first session.


Prior to approving the text as a whole, separate recorded votes were taken on:  the final words of operative paragraph 2 (108 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 16 abstentions); operative paragraph 3 (115 in favour to none against, with 18 abstentions); operative paragraph 4(b) (118 in favour to none against, with 16 abstentions); and operative paragraph 6 (116 in favour to none against, with 19 abstentions).


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 1 November by a vote of 122 in favour to none against, with 21 abstentions.


Deeply concerned by the growing risk of linkages between terrorism and weapons of mass destruction, a draft resolution on Measures to prevent terrorists from acquiring weapons of mass destruction (document A/60/463 XXV) would call on all Member States to support international efforts to prevent terrorists from acquiring mass destruction weapons and their delivery means.


It would urge all Member States to take and strengthen national measures to prevent terrorists from acquiring weapons of mass destruction, their delivery means and materials and technologies related to their manufacture, and invite them to inform the Secretary-General, on a voluntary basis, of the measures taken in this regard.


The Assembly would invite all Member States to consider signing and ratifying the International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism to enable its early entry into force.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 26 October, without a vote.


A draft resolution entitled Reducing nuclear danger (document A/60/463 XXVI) would have the Assembly, considering that the hair-trigger alert of nuclear weapons carries unacceptable risks of unintentional or accidental use of nuclear weapons, which would have catastrophic consequences for all mankind, would call for a review of nuclear doctrines and, in that context, immediate and urgent steps to reduce the risks of unintentional and accidental use of nuclear weapons.


The Assembly requests the five nuclear-weapon States to take measures towards the implementation of that provision, and call upon all Member States to take the necessary measures to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons in all its aspects and to promote nuclear disarmament, with the objective of eliminating nuclear weapons.  The Secretary-General would be requested, among other things, to intensify efforts and support initiatives that would contribute to the full implementation of the seven recommendations identified in the report of the Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters that would significantly reduce the risk of nuclear war.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 24 October by a vote of 94 in favour to 45 against, with 14 abstentions.


According to a draft decision on an international instrument to enable States to identify and trace, in a timely and reliable manner, illicit small arms and light weapons (document A/60/463), the Assembly would decide to adopt the resolution contained in the Annex to the Report of the Open-ended Working Group (documents A/60/88 and Corr.2).


The Committee approved the draft decision on 26 October by a vote of 145 in favour to none against, with 25 abstentions.


Noting with regret that anti-personnel mines continue to be used in conflicts around the world, causing human suffering and impeding post-conflict development, a draft resolution on Implementation of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-personnel Mines and on Their Destruction (document A/60/463 XXVII) would have the Assembly invite all States that did not sign the Convention to accede to it without delay.


The Assembly would stress the importance of the full and effective implementation of and compliance with the Convention, including through the swift implementation of the Nairobi Action Plan.  It would urge all States parties to provide the Secretary-General with complete and timely information as required under article 7 of the Convention in order to promote transparency and compliance.


It would renew its call upon al States and other relevant parties to work together to promote, support and advance the care, rehabilitation and social and economic reintegration of mine victims, mine risk-education programmes and the removal and destruction of anti-personnel mines placed or stockpiled throughout the world.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 28 October by a vote of 147 in favour to none against, with 15 abstentions.


According to a draft resolution on the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons in all its aspects (document A/60/463 XXVIII), the Assembly would call upon all States to implement the International Instrument to Enable States to Identify and Trace, in a Timely and Reliable Manner, Illicit Small Arms and Light Weapons, contained in the Annex to the Report of the Open-Ended Working Group.


The Assembly would decide to establish a group of governmental experts, appointed by the Secretary-General on the basis of equitable geographical representation, commencing after the Review Conference and no later than 2007, to consider further steps to enhance international cooperation in preventing, combating and eradicating illicit brokering in small arms and light weapons in three sessions of one week’s duration each, and to submit the report on the outcome of its study to the General Assembly at its sixty-second session.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 26 October, without a vote.


Prior to its approval, the Committee decided to retain operative paragraph 2, which calls for States to implement the instrument, by a recorded vote of 162 in favour to none against, with 2 abstentions ( Jamaica, Mexico).


According to a draft resolution entitled “Information on confidence-building measures in the field of conventional arms” (document A/60/463 XXIX), the Assembly would welcome all confidence-building measures in the field of conventional arms already undertaken by Member States, as well as the information on such measures voluntarily provided.


It would request the Secretary-General to establish, with the financial support of States in a position to do so, an electronic database containing information provided by Member States and to assist them, at their request, in the organization of seminars, courses and workshops aimed at enhancing the knowledge of new developments in the field.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 25 October, without a vote.


A draft text on the United Nations regional centres for peace and disarmament (document A/60/464 I) would have the Assembly reiterate the importance of the United Nations regional activities to increase the stability and security of its Member States, which could be promoted in a substantive manner by the maintenance and revitalization of the three regional centres for peace and disarmament.


The Assembly would appeal to Member States in each region, as well as to international governmental and non-governmental organizations and foundations, to make voluntary contributions to the regional centres in their respective regions to strengthen their activities and initiatives.


The Committee approved the draft text on 31 October, without a vote.


A draft resolution on the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean (document A/60/464 II), would have the Assembly encourage the Regional Centre to further develop activities in the important area of disarmament and development.


It would appeal to Member States, particularly those within the region, as well as to international governmental and non-governmental organizations and foundations, to make and to increase voluntary contributions to strengthen the Regional Centre, its programme of activities and the implementation thereof.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 31 October without a vote.


Noting that trends in the post-cold war era have emphasized the function of the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Asia and the Pacific in assisting Member States as they deal with new security concerns and disarmament issues emerging in the region, the Assembly would note the Regional Centre’s important role in assisting region-specific initiatives of Member States and reaffirm its strong support for its forthcoming operation and further strengthening, according to a revised draft text (document A/60/464 III).


The Assembly, underlining the importance of the Kathmandu process as a powerful vehicle for the development of the practice of region-wide security and disarmament dialogue, would appeal to Member States to make voluntary contributions -- the Centre’s only resources -- to strengthen its programme of activities.


By further terms of the text, the Assembly would request the Secretary-General to provide the Regional Centre with the necessary support, within existing resources, in carrying out its activities.  The Secretary-General would also be urged to ensure the Regional Centre’s physical operation from Kathmandu within six months of the date of signature of the host country agreement.


The Committee approved the draft text on 25 October, without a vote.


A draft resolution on the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Africa (document A/60/464 IV) would have the Assembly appeal once again to all States, as well as to international governmental and non-governmental organizations and foundations, to make voluntary contributions to strengthen the Centre’s programmes and activities and facilitate their implementation.


The Assembly would request the Secretary-General to facilitate close cooperation between the Regional Centre and the African Union, in particular in the areas of peace, security and development and to continue to provide assistance towards stabilizing the financial situation of the Centre.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 31 October, without a vote.


Bearing in mind the establishment by the Secretary-General in May 1992 of the United Nations Standing Advisory Committee on Security Questions in Central Africa, the purpose of which is to encourage arms limitation, disarmament, non-proliferation and development in the subregion, the Assembly would appeal to Member States and to governmental and non-governmental organizations to make additional voluntary contributions to the Committee’s Trust Fund (document A/60/464 V), according to a revised draft resolution.


By a further provision of a draft, the Assembly would reaffirm its support for efforts aimed at promoting confidence-building measures at the regional and subregional levels, in order to ease tensions and conflicts in Central Africa and to further peace, stability and sustainable development in the subregion.


Under a related term, the Assembly would encourage the States members of the Economic Community of Central African States (ECCAS) to pursue their efforts to promote peace and security in their subregion.  It would encourage the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Rwanda to pursue their efforts to strengthen bilateral relations.


The Assembly would emphasize the need to make the early warning mechanism in Central Africa operational so that it would serve, on the one hand, as an instrument for analysing and monitoring political situations in the States members of the Standing Advisory Committee, with a view to preventing the outbreak of future armed conflicts, and, on the other hand, as a technical body through which the member States will carry out the Committee’s 1992 work programme.  It would ask the Secretary-General to provide it with the assistance necessary for it to function properly.


It would strongly appeal to the international community to support the efforts undertaken by the States concerned to implement DDR programmes.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 28 October, without a vote.


Convinced that the use of nuclear weapons poses the most serious threat to the survival of mankind and that a multilateral, universal and binding agreement banning their use or threat would contribute to eliminating the nuclear threat, the Assembly would reiterate its request to the Conference on Disarmament to commence negotiations, in order to reach agreement on such an instrument, according to a draft resolution entitled Convention on the prohibition of the use of nuclear weapons (document A/60/464 VI).  The Assembly would request the Conference to report to the Assembly on the results of those negotiations.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 24 October by a vote of 97 in favour to 46 against, with 11 abstentions.


Under the terms of a draft resolution on the Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (document A/60/465 I), the Assembly would reiterate its conviction that the Institute should continue to conduct independent research on problems relating to disarmament and security and to undertake specialized research requiring a high degree of expertise.  It would ask all Member States to continue to make financial contributions to the Institute.


The Assembly would recommend that the Secretary-General implement the relevant recommendations of the Office of Internal Oversight Services (OIOS) and decisions of the Board of Trustees, and continue to seek ways to increase the funding of the Institute, within existing resources.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 25 October, without a vote.


Stressing the urgent need for the Conference on Disarmament to commence its substantive work at the beginning of its 2006 session, a draft resolution on the Report of the Conference on Disarmament (document A/60/465 II), would have the Assembly call upon the Conference to intensify negotiations and explore possibilities with a view to reaching an agreement on a programme of work.


By further terms, the Assembly would request Conference to submit a report on its work to the Assembly.  It would ask all Conference members to cooperate with the current President and successive Presidents in their efforts to guide the Conference to the early commencement of substantive work in its 2006 session.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 24 October, without a vote.


In a draft resolution on the report of the Disarmament Commission (document A/60/465 III), the Assembly would reaffirm the mandate of the Disarmament Commission as the specialized, deliberative body within the United Nations multilateral disarmament machinery that allows for in-depth deliberations on specific disarmament issues, leading to the submission of concrete recommendations on those issues.  The Assembly would request the Commission to meet for a period not exceeding three weeks in 2006, from 10 to 28 April, and to submit a substantive report to the Assembly at its sixty-first session.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 1 November, without a vote.


A draft resolution on the risk of nuclear proliferation in the Middle East (document A/60/466) would have the Assembly, noting that Israel remained the only State in the Middle East that was not a party to the NPT, would call on it to accede to the Treaty without further delay and not to develop, produce, test or otherwise acquire nuclear weapons, and to renounce possession of nuclear weapons, and to place all its unsafeguarded nuclear facilities under full-scope IAEA safeguards as an important confidence-building measure among all States of the region and as a step towards enhancing peace and security.


The Assembly would also welcome the conclusions on the Middle East of the 2000 NPT Review Conference.  It would ask the Secretary-General to report to the Assembly at its next session on implementation of the present text.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 24 October by a vote of 149 in favour to 2 against ( Israel, United States), with 4 abstentions ( Australia, Cameroon, Ethiopia, India).


Prior to acting on the draft as a whole, the Committee approved, in a separate vote, preambular paragraph 6, which recalls the Final Document of the 2000 NPT Review Conference, which, among other things, called on those remaining States not parties to the Treaty to accede to it.  Members voted to retain that paragraph by 145 in favour to 2 against ( India, Israel), with 5 abstentions ( Bhutan, Cameroon, Mauritius, Pakistan, United States).


According to a draft resolution on the Convention on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Certain Conventional Weapons Which May Be Deemed to Be Excessively Injurious or to Have Indiscriminate Effects (document A/60/467), the Assembly would call on all States that have not yet done so to take all measures to become parties as soon as possible to the Convention and the Protocols thereto, as amended, with a view to achieving the widest possible adherence to these instruments at an early date, so as to ultimately achieve their universality.


By further terms, the Assembly would request that the Third Review Conference and its preparatory meetings exert maximum effort to promote universalization of the Convention, as amended, and of all its Protocols, including through the holding of regional conferences and seminars.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 25 October, without a vote.


A draft resolution on the Strengthening of security and cooperation in the Mediterranean region (document A/60/468) would have the Assembly call upon all States of the Mediterranean region that have not yet done so to adhere to all the multilaterally negotiated legal instruments related to the field of disarmament and non-proliferation, thus creating the necessary conditions for strengthening peace and cooperation in the region.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 25 October, without a vote.


In a text on the CTBT (document A/60/469) the Assembly, recognizing that there now exist conditions for the establishment of a world free of nuclear weapons, and stressing the need to take concrete practical steps towards achieving this goal, would urge the nuclear-weapon States to stop immediately the qualitative improvement, development, production and stockpiling of nuclear warheads and their delivery systems.  The Assembly would also urge the nuclear-weapon States, as an interim measure, to de-alert and deactivate immediately their nuclear weapons and to take other concrete measures to reduce further the operational status of their nuclear-weapon States.  It would urge those States to commence multilateral negotiations among themselves at an appropriate stage on further deep reductions of nuclear weapons as an effective nuclear disarmament measure.


It would reiterate its call upon those States to undertake the step-by-step reduction of the nuclear threat and to carry out effective nuclear disarmament measures with a view to achieving the total elimination of those weapons.  The Assembly would also call for the full and effective implementation of the 13 steps for nuclear disarmament contained in the Final Document of the 2000 NPT Review Conference.


In a related term, the Assembly would call on the nuclear-weapon States, pending the total elimination of nuclear weapons, to agree on an internationally and legally binding instrument on a joint undertaking not to be the first to use nuclear weapons.  It calls on all States to conclude an internationally and legally binding instrument on security assurances of non-use and non-threat of use of nuclear weapons against non-nuclear-weapon States.  It would also call for the early entry into force and strict observance of the CTBT.


Also according to the text, the Assembly would express regret that the 2005 Review Conference of the Parties to the NPT were unable to achieve any substantial result, and that the Outcome Document of the Assembly’s recent High-Level Summit failed to make any reference to nuclear disarmament and nuclear non-proliferation.  It would also express regret that the Conference on Disarmament was unable to establish an ad hoc committee on nuclear disarmament at its 2005 session.


In that connection, it would reiterate its call on the Conference to establish, on a priority basis, an ad hoc committee to deal with nuclear disarmament early in 2005, and to commence negotiations on a phased programme of nuclear disarmament leading to the eventual total elimination of nuclear weapons.  The Assembly would urge the Conference on Disarmament to agree on a work programme, which includes the immediate commencement of negotiations on a fissile material cut-off treaty, with a view to their conclusion within five years.


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 24 October by a vote of 149 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 4 abstentions ( Colombia, India, Mauritius, Syria).


By the terms of a draft resolution on the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on Their Destruction (Biological Weapons Convention) (document A/60/470), the Assembly would welcome the data and information provided to date, and reiterate its call upon all States to the Convention to participate in the exchange of information and data agreed to in the Final Declaration of the Third Review Conference of the Parties to the Convention.


The Assembly would recall the decisions reached at the Fifth Review Conference, among them, to discuss and promote in 2005 common understanding and effective action, including on the topic of the content, promulgation and adoption of codes of conduct for scientists, and call on the States parties to the Convention to participate in its implementation.


It would note that the Sixth Review Conference would be held in Geneva in 2006, and that the dates would be formally agreed by the Preparatory Committee for the Conference in Geneva during the week of 24 April. 


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 28 October, without a vote.


By a draft decision on behalf of the Movement of non-aligned countries on review of the implementation of the Declaration on the strengthening of international security, the Assembly would decide to include the item in the provisional agenda of its next session (document A/60/471).


The Committee approved the draft resolution on 26 October, without a vote.


Fourth Committee


Topics addressed in the reports include assistance in mine action (agenda item 27); the effects of atomic radiation (item 28); international cooperation in the peaceful uses of outer space (item 29); the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) (item 30); Israeli practices affecting the human rights of the Palestinian people and other Arabs of the occupied territories (item 31); comprehensive review of the whole question of peacekeeping operations in all their aspects (item 32); questions related to information (item 33); and revitalization of the work of the General Assembly (item 116).


Decolonization issues before the Assembly include:  information from Non-Self-Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73 e of the United Nations Charter (item 34); economic and other activities which affect the interests of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories (item 35); implementation of the Decolonization Declaration by the United Nations specialized agencies and associated international institutions (item 36); and offers by Member States of study and training facilities for inhabitants of Non-Self-Governing Territories (item 37).


Decolonization


The Assembly had before it five reports of the Fourth Committee on decolonization issues.  The report on implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples (document A/60/472) contains sevendraft resolutions and one draft decision recommended for adoption.


Draft resolution I, on the question of Western Sahara, would have the Assembly underline Security Council resolution 1495 (2003) in which the Council expressed its support for the peace plan for self-determination of the people of that Territory as an optimum political solution on the basis of agreement between the two parties concerned.  It would also underline that the parties reacted differently to this plan and continue to support strongly the efforts of the Secretary-General and his Personal Envoy in order to achieve a mutually acceptable political solution to the dispute over Western Sahara.


Also by the draft, the Assembly would call upon all the parties, and the States of the region, to cooperate fully with the Secretary-General and his Personal Envoy, and also call upon them to cooperate with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in its efforts to resolve the fate of the people unaccounted for.  It would further call upon the parties to abide by their obligations under international humanitarian law to release without further delay all those held since the start of the conflict.


By draft resolution II, on the question of New Caledonia, the General Assembly would welcome the significant developments that have taken place in that Territory, as exemplified by the signing of the Nouméa Accord in May 1998, and urge all parties involved to maintain, in the framework of that Accord, their dialogue in the spirit of harmony.  The Assembly would note the relevant provisions of the Accord aimed at taking more broadly into account the Kanak identity in the political and social organization of New Caledonia, and also those provisions of the Accord relating to control of immigration and protection of local employment.


Further by the text, the Assembly would invite all the parties involved to continue promoting a framework for the Territory’s peaceful progress towards an act of self-determination in which all options are open, and which would safeguard the rights of all sectors of the population.


Draft resolution III, on the question of Tokelau, would have the General Assembly note that the Territory remains firmly committed to the development of self-government and to an act of self-determination that would result in its assuming a status, in accordance with the options on future status for Non-Self-Governing Territories contained in principle VI of the annex to General Assembly resolution 1541 (XV) of 15 December 1960.


By other terms, the Assembly would note the decision of the Territory’s “General Fono” (legislative branch) to hold a referendum on self-government on the basis of a draft constitution for Tokelau and a treaty of free association with New Zealand.  It would also note the wish of Tokelau, supported by New Zealand, that the United Nations monitor the referendum.


The report also contains draft resolution IV on the questions of American Samoa , Anguilla, Bermuda , British Virgin Islands , Cayman Islands , Guam , Montserrat , Pitcairn, Saint Helena , Turks and Caicos Islands , and the United States Virgin Islands.  The draft’s general section, Part A, would have the Assembly reaffirm that, in the decolonization process, there is no alternative to the principle of self-determination, which is also a fundamental human right.  The Assembly would urge Member States to contribute to United Nations effort to usher in a world free of colonialism within the Second International Decade for the Eradication of Colonialism (2000-2010), and call on them to continue to give their full support to the Special Committee on decolonization “in its endeavours towards that noble goal”.


In a related provision, the Assembly would stress the importance of implementing the Decade’s action plan, particularly by expediting the application of the work programme for the decolonization of each Non-Self-Governing Territory, on a case-by-case basis and by completing the periodic analyses of the progress and extent of the Declaration’s implementation.


The Assembly would, by other terms, reaffirm the responsibility of the administering Powers to promote the economic and social development, and preserve the cultural identity, of the Territories.  It would recommend that priority continue to be given, in consultation with the territorial governments concerned, to strengthening and diversifying their respective economies.


Part B of the text takes up the question of each individual Territory.


Draft resolution V, on dissemination of information on decolonization, would have the Assembly approve the activities of the Department of Public Information and the Department of Political Affairs in the dissemination of information on decolonization.  It would consider it important to continue and expand the Special Committee’s efforts to ensure the widest possible dissemination of information on decolonization, with particular emphasis on the options of self-determination available to the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories.


Among other things, the two Departments would be requested to:  develop procedures to collect, prepare and disseminate, particularly to the Territories, basic material on the issue of self-determination; to seek the full cooperation of the administering Powers in the discharge of those tasks; develop a working relationship with the appropriate regional and intergovernmental organizations, particularly in the Pacific and Caribbean regions, by holding periodic consultations and exchanging information; and encourage the involvement of non-governmental organizations, as well as the Non-Self-Governing Territories, in the dissemination of information on decolonization.


By draft resolution VI, on implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples, the Assembly would reaffirm, once again, that the existence of colonialism in any form or manifestation, including economic exploitation, is incompatible with the United Nations Charter, the Declaration on Decolonization and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.  It would call upon the administering Powers to take all necessary steps to enable the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories to exercise fully, as soon as possible, their right to self-determination, including independence, and to cooperate fully with the Special Committee to finalize, before the end of 2005, a constructive programme of work on a case-by-case basis for the Territories so as to facilitate the implementation of the Special Committee’s mandate and the relevant decolonization resolutions.


The Assembly would, by other terms, request the Special Committee to continue to seek suitable means for the immediate and full implementation of the Declaration and to carry out the actions approved by the Assembly regarding the International Decade for the Eradication of Colonialism and the Second Decade in all Territories that have not yet exercised their right to self-determination, including independence.  In particular, the Special Committee would be asked to formulate, before the end of 2006, a constructive programme of work on a case-by-case basis for the Territories to facilitate the implementation of the Committee’s mandate.


By other terms, the Assembly would call upon the administering Powers to ensure that the economic activities in the Territories under their administration do not adversely affect the interests of the peoples, but instead promote development, and to assist them in the exercise of their right to self-determination.  It would urge the administering Powers to safeguard and guarantee the inalienable rights of the peoples of the Territories to their natural resources, including land, and request them to take all necessary steps to protect the property rights of those peoples.


Draft resolution VII, on the Second International Decade for the Eradication of Colonialism, would have the Assembly call on Member States to redouble their efforts to implement the Plan of Action for the Second International Decade.  It would request Member States, specialized agencies and other United Nations organizations, as well as governmental and non-governmental organizations, to actively support and participate in the implementation of the Plan of Action during the Decade.  In addition, the Secretary-General would be requested to provide the necessary resources for the Plan of Action’s successful implementation.


The report also contains a draft decision on the question of Gibraltar, by which the Assembly would urge the Governments of Spain and the United Kingdom, while listening to the interests and aspirations of Gibraltar, to reach a definitive solution to that question.  It would welcome the establishment of a new tripartite forum for dialogue under the 16 December 2004 statement made jointly by the Governments of Spain, the United Kingdom and Gibraltar.


Contained in the Fourth Committee’s report on Information from Non-Self Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73 e of the Charter of the United Nations (document A/60/480) is a draft resolution that would have the Assembly request the administering Powers concerned to transmit or continue to transmit to the Secretary-General the information prescribed in Article 73 e of the Charter, as well as the fullest possible information on political and constitutional developments in the Territories concerned.


Another report, entitled economic and other activities which affect the interests of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories (document A/60/481), recommends that the Assembly reaffirm the responsibility of the administering Powers to promote the political, economic, social and educational advancement of the Non-Self-Governing Territories.  It would urge the administering Powers to safeguard and guarantee the inalienable right of the people of the Territories to their natural resources, and to establish and maintain control over the future development of the resources.


By further provisions, the Assembly would call upon the administering Powers to ensure that no discriminatory working conditions prevail in the Territories under their administration, and to promote in each Territory a fair system of wages applicable to all the inhabitants without any discrimination.


The Committee’s report on the implementation of the Declaration of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations (document A/60/482) contains a draft resolution by which the Assembly would recommend that all States intensify their efforts in the specialized agencies and other United Nations system organizations, to ensure the full and effective implementation of the decolonization Declaration contained in General Assembly resolution 1514 (XV), and other relevant resolutions.  It would also reaffirm the recognition by the Assembly, the Security Council and other United Nations organs that the legitimacy of the aspirations of the peoples of the Territories to exercise their right to self-determination entails, as a corollary, the extension of all appropriate assistance to those peoples.


By further terms, the Assembly would request the specialized agencies and other United Nations, international and regional organizations to review conditions in each Territory, so as to take appropriate measures to accelerate progress in their economic and social sectors.  The specialized agencies and United Nations system organizations would be requested to provide information on environmental problems facing the Territories; the impact of natural disasters and other environmental problems on those Territories; ways to assist the Territories to fight drug trafficking, money-laundering and other criminal activities; and the illegal exploitation of their marine resources.


Also by that draft, the Assembly would request the administering Powers to facilitate the participation of appointed and elected representatives of Non-Self-Governing Territories in the relevant meetings and conferences of the United Nations specialized agencies and other organizations, so that the Territories may benefit from the related activities.


The Committee’s report on offers by Member States of study and training facilities for inhabitants of Non-Self-governing Territories (document A/60/483) contains a text by which the Assembly would invite all States to make or continue to make generous offers of study and training facilities to the inhabitants of those Territories and, wherever possible, provide travel funds to prospective students.  It would urge the administering Powers to take effective measures to ensure the widespread and continuous dissemination, in the Territories under their administration, of information relating to such offers and to provide all the necessary facilities to enable students to avail themselves of such offers.


United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees


The Fourth Committee’s report on the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) (document A/60/476) recommends that the Assembly adopt four draft resolutions and one draft decision.


By draft resolution I, on assistance to Palestine refugees, the General Assembly would note with regret that repatriation or compensation of the refugees, as provided for in its resolution 194 (III) of December 1948 and subsequent resolutions, has not yet been effected and that the situation of the Palestine refugees continues to be a matter of grave concern.  The Assembly would also note with regret that the United Nations Conciliation Commission for Palestine has been unable to find a means to achieve progress in implementing that same resolution, and would request the Commission to exert continued efforts in that regard.


Also by that text, the Assembly would affirm the need for the continuation of UNRWA’s work, and the importance of its operations and services for the well-being of the Palestine refugees and the region’s stability, pending resolution of the Palestine refugee question.  The Assembly would call upon all donors to continue to make the most generous efforts possible to meet the Agency’s anticipated needs, including those mentioned in recent emergency appeals.


By draft resolution II, on persons displaced as a result of the June 1967 and subsequent hostilities, the Assembly would reaffirm the right of all those persons to return to their homes or former places of residence in the territories occupied by Israel since 1967.  Deeply concerned that the mechanism agreed upon by the parties (in the 1993 Declaration of Principles on Interim Self-Government Arrangements) for the return of displaced persons has not been complied with, the Assembly would stress the necessity of an accelerated return.


In the meantime, the Assembly would, by further terms, endorse the Commissioner-General’s efforts to provide humanitarian assistance on an emergency basis and as a temporary measure to persons in the area who are currently displaced and in serious need of continuing assistance.  It would strongly appeal to all Governments, organizations and individuals to contribute generously to UNRWA and other intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations.


Draft resolution III, on operations of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, would have the Assembly express its appreciation to the Commissioner-General and all Agency staff for their tireless efforts and valuable work.  The Assembly would call upon Israel to comply fully with the provisions of the 1949 Geneva Convention on protection of civilians in time of war, and urge the Government of Israel to speedily compensate the Agency for damage to its property.  It would also call upon Israel to cease obstructing the movement of UNRWA personnel, vehicles and supplies, and to cease the levying of extra fees and charges.


By other terms, the Assembly would call upon Israel to abide by Articles 100, 104 and 105 of the United Nations Charter, and by the Convention on the Privileges and Immunities of the United Nations and the Convention on the Safety of United Nations and Associated Personnel, in order to ensure the safety of UNRWA personnel, the protection of its institutions and the security of its facilities in the Occupied Palestinian Territory.


Affirming that UNRWA’s functioning remains essential in all fields of operation, the Assembly would note the success of the Agency’s microfinance and microenterprise programmes, and call upon the Agency, in close cooperation with the relevant agencies, to continue to contribute towards the development of the economic and social stability of the Palestine refugees in all fields of operation.


By draft resolution IV, on Palestine refugees’ properties and their revenues, the Assembly would reaffirm that the refugees are entitled to their property and to the income derived therefrom, in conformity with the principles of equity and justice.  The Assembly would request the Secretary-General to take all appropriate steps, in consultation with the United Nations Conciliation Commission for Palestine, for the protection of Arab property, assets and property rights in Israel, and call, once again, on Israel to render all facilities and assistance to the Secretary-General in implementing the present resolution.


Further by that text, the Assembly would call upon all the parties concerned to provide the Secretary-General with any pertinent information in their possession concerning Arab property, assets and property rights in Israel that would assist him in implementing the present resolution.  It would urge the Palestinian and Israeli sides to deal with the important issue of Palestine refugees’ properties and revenues in the framework of the final status negotiations of the Middle East peace process.


By a draft decision on the increase in the membership of the Advisory Commission on UNRWA, the Assembly would decide to invite Australia, Canada, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland, whose contributions to UNRWA activities have exceeded an annual average of $5 million over the past three years, to become members of that body.  It would also invite the European Community to attend the Commission’s meetings, whereas Palestine and the League of Arab States would be invited to attend the meetings as observers.


Israeli Practices in Occupied Arab Territories


The Fourth Committee’s report on its consideration of the report of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories (document A/60/477) recommends to the Assembly the adoption of five draft resolutions.


By draft resolution I, on the work of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices, the Assembly would deplore those policies and practices that violate the human rights of the Palestinian people and other Arabs of the occupied territories.  It would express grave concern about the continuing crisis situation in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, since 28 September 2000, as a result of Israeli practices and measures, and especially condemn all Israeli settlement activities and the construction of the separation wall, as well as the excessive and indiscriminate use of force against the civilian population, including extrajudicial executions.


The Assembly would, by further terms, request the Special Committee, pending complete termination of the Israeli occupation, to continue to investigate Israeli policies and practices in the Occupied Palestinian Territory and other Arab territories occupied by Israel since 1967, especially Israeli violations of the Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War of 12 August 1949.  It would further request the Special Committee to continue to investigate the treatment of prisoners and detainees in those occupied territories.


Draft resolution II, on the applicability of the Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War, of 12 August 1949, would have the Assembly reaffirm that the Convention is applicable to the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and other Arab territories occupied since 1967, and demand that Israel comply scrupulously with its provisions.  It would call upon all High Contracting Parties to the Convention to continue to exert all efforts to ensure respect for its provisions by Israel in the occupied territories.


By draft resolution III, on Israeli settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territory , including East Jerusalem , and the occupied Syrian Golan, the Assembly would reaffirm that those settlements are illegal, and an obstacle to peace and economic and social development.


In addition, the Assembly would welcome the Israeli withdrawal from the Gaza Strip and parts of the northern West Bank, and the dismantlement of the settlements therein as a step towards the implementation of the “Road Map”.  In that regard, it would call upon Israel to comply strictly with its obligations under international law with respect to the alteration of the character and status of the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem.  It would emphasize the need for the parties to speedily resolve all remaining issues in the Gaza Strip, including the removal of rubble.


Further by that text, the Assembly would reiterate its demand for the complete cessation of all Israeli settlement activities in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, and call for the full implementation of the relevant Security Council resolutions.  It would also demand that Israel comply with its legal obligations under international law, as mentioned in the advisory opinion rendered on 9 July 2004 by the International Court of Justice.  The Assembly would reiterate its calls for the prevention of all acts of violence by Israeli settlers.


The Assembly also had before it draft resolution IV regarding Israeli practices affecting the human rights of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem.  By its terms, the Assembly would reiterate that all measures and actions taken by Israel in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, in violation of the relevant provisions of the Geneva Convention on the protection of civilians in wartime, and contrary to the relevant Security Council resolutions, are illegal and have no validity.  The Assembly would demand that Israel cease immediately all measures and actions taken in violation and in grave breach of the Convention, including the construction of the separation wall in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including in and around East Jerusalem, as well as extrajudicial executions.


The Assembly would, by other terms, demand that Israel cease all practices and actions that violate the human rights of the Palestinian people and that it scrupulously abide by its obligations under human rights law.  It would also demand that Israel comply with its legal obligations as mentioned in the advisory opinion of 9 July 2004 rendered by the International Court of Justice and as demanded in resolution ES-10/15 of 20 July 2004, by, among other actions, dismantling the wall and making reparation for all damage caused by its construction.


Other provisions of the text would have the Assembly condemn all acts of terror, provocation, incitement and destruction, especially the excessive and indiscriminate use of force by Israeli forces against Palestinian civilians, and express grave concern at the use of suicide bombing attacks against Israeli civilians.


By draft resolution V, on the occupied Syrian Golan, the Assembly would call upon Israel to comply with the relevant resolutions on the occupied Syrian Golan, in particular Security Council resolution 497 (1981), by which the Council decided that the Israeli decision to impose its laws, jurisdiction and administration on the occupied Syrian Golan is null and void and without international legal effect, and demand that Israel rescind its decision.


The Assembly would also call upon Israel to desist from changing the physical character, demographic composition, institutional structure and legal status of the occupied Syrian Golan, and to desist from the establishment of settlements.  It would further call upon Israel to desist from imposing Israeli citizenship and identity cards on the Syrian citizens in the occupied Syrian Golan and from its repressive measures against the population.


Information


The Fourth Committee’s report on questions relating to information (document A/60/479) containstwo draft resolutionsand a draft decisionrecommended for adoption by the Assembly.


By draft resolution A, entitled Information in the service of humanity, the General Assembly would urge all countries, the United Nations system and all others concerned to cooperate and interact with a view to reducing existing disparities in information flows at all levels by increasing assistance for the development of communication infrastructure and capabilities in developing countries.  Those countries and other entities would be urged to:  ensure for journalists the free and effective performance of their professional tasks; and enhance regional cooperation among developing countries, as well as cooperation between developed and developing countries, to strengthen communication capacities in the developing countries.


Draft resolution B, entitled United Nations public information policies and activities, would have the Assembly reaffirm that the Organization’s voice must be heard in a clear and effective manner, emphasizing the essential role of the Department of Public Information in that regard.  The Assembly would also reaffirm the central role of the Committee on Information in United Nations public information policies and activities.


Further by that text, the Assembly would emphasize the importance of the network of United Nations information centres in enhancing the Organization’s public image to local populations, especially in developing countries.  It would stress the importance of rationalizing the network, in consultation, on a case-by-case basis, with all concerned Member States in which existing information centres are located, the countries served by them, as well as other interested countries in the region, taking into consideration the distinctive characteristics of each region.  Further, the Assembly would welcome the Department’s ongoing efforts to enhance multilingualism in its activities, and encourage it to continue its endeavours in that regard.


With respect to the Department’s general activities, the Assembly would reaffirm that the Department is the United Nations’ focal point for information policies and the primary news centre for information about the Organization, its activities and those of the Secretary-General.  The Assembly would stress the importance of a coherent and results-oriented approach by United Nations entities involved in public information activities and the provision of resources for their implementation.


Further by the text, the Assembly would encourage the Department of Public Information and the Department of Peacekeeping Operations to continue their cooperation in raising awareness of the new realities, successes and challenges faced by peacekeeping operations.  It would also encourage the Department of Public Information to continue to provide the necessary support for the dissemination of information pertaining to dialogue among civilizations and the culture of peace.


The draft resolution also contains a section on traditional means of communication -- such as radio, library services, outreach services and guided tours -- and on strengthening the role of the Department as a focal point for two-way interaction with civil society relating to the Organization’s priorities and concerns.


By the draft decision before it, the Assembly would increase the membership of the Committee on Information from 107 to 108, appointing Austria as a member.


Assistance in Mine-action


The Fourth Committee’s report on Assistance in mine-action (document A/60/473) contains one draft resolution by which the Assembly would urge non-State actors to halt immediately and unconditionally new deployments of mines and associated explosive devices.


By other terms, the Assembly would urge all States, as well as the United Nations system and other relevant organizations, to provide, among other things, assistance to affected countries in establishing national mine-action programmes, as well as reliable, predictable and timely contributions for mine-action activities, including those relating to victim assistance and mine-risk education.  Noting the potential that mine action could have as a peacebuilding and confidence-building measure in post-conflict situations, it would declare that 4 April of each year shall be officially proclaimed and observed as International Day for Mine Awareness and Assistance in Mine Action.


Peaceful Uses of Outer Space


The Committee’s report on international cooperation in the peaceful uses of outer space (document A/60/475) recommends that the Assembly reaffirm the importance of international cooperation in developing the rule of law, including the relevant norms of space law and their important role in international cooperation for the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes.  The Assembly would urge States that had not yet become parties to the international treaties governing the uses of outer space to consider ratifying or acceding to those treaties, as well as incorporating them into national legislation.


By other terms, the Assembly recommends that more attention be paid and political support provided to all matters relating to the protection and preservation of outer space, especially those potentially affecting the Earth’s environment.  The Assembly would urge all States, in particular those with major space capabilities, to contribute actively to the goal of preventing an arms race in outer space.


Effects of Atomic Radiation


The Committee’s report on Effects of atomic radiation (document A/60/474) contains one draft resolution by which the Assembly would request the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation to continue its work, including its activities to increase knowledge of the levels, effects and risks of ionizing radiation from all sources, and endorse that body’s plans for its future activities of scientific review and assessment.


Further by that text, the Assembly would request the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to continue providing support for the work of the Scientific Committee and invite Member States, the organizations of the United Nations system and non-governmental organizations to provide further relevant data about doses, effects and risks from various sources of radiation.


Other Reports


The Assembly also had before it a Fourth Committee report on Revitalization of the work of the General Assembly (document A/60/525).  That item had been allocated to the Committee for the sole purpose of considering and taking action on its tentative programme of work for the sixty-first session.  The report contains a draft programme of work for the next session, as well as a “non-paper” on the Committee’s working methods and agenda items.


Finally, the Assembly had before it the Fourth Committee’s report on the comprehensive review of the whole question of peacekeeping operations in all their aspects (document A/60/478).


Fifth Committee


By the terms of the draft on the financing of the United Nations Mission in the Sudan (document A/60/562), the Assembly would appropriate $222.03 million for the period from 1 July 2004 to 30 June 2005 for the establishment of the Mission.  For the period from 1 July 2005 to 30 June 2006, it would appropriate an amount of $969.47 million, inclusive of the $315.98 million previously authorized by the Assembly under the terms of its resolution 59/292 for the period from 1 July to 31 October 2005.


By another Fifth Committee draft (document A/60/574), the Assembly would appropriate some $1.13 billion for the United Nations Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC) for the period from 1 July 2005 to 30 June 2006, inclusive of the amount of $383.19 million previously authorized under the terms of resolution 59/285 B last June, in addition to $20.22 million for the peacekeeping support account and the United Nations Logistics Base.


Sixth Committee


A report on the scope of legal protection under the Convention on the Safety of United Nations and associated personnel (document A/60/518) contains one draft resolution on the Optional Protocol to the Convention, which was approved without a vote as orally amended on 16 November.  By the draft, the Assembly would adopt the Protocol contained in an annex, would invite the Secretary-General as depository to open it for signature, and would invite States to become parties to it.


The eight-article Protocol supplementing the Convention sets out the scope of its application to those engaged in delivery of assistance, including emergency humanitarian assistance.  It sets out the duties of States Parties and says the Protocol shall be open for signature at Headquarters for 12 months from 16 January 2006.  The terms of consent to be bound are set out, as are the terms of entry into force 30 days after 22 instruments of ratification, acceptance, approval or accession are deposited with the Secretary General.  Denunciation would take effect a year after written notification.  The authentic texts of the Protocol in official languages will be deposited with the Secretary-General.


Also before the Assembly is a Committee report on measures to eliminate international terrorism (document A/60/519).  The draft was approved without a vote on 29 November.  By the draft, the Assembly would decide that the Ad Hoc Committee on Terrorism would reconvene from 27 February to 3 March 2006 to resume its elaboration of the draft comprehensive convention against international terrorism and would notify the Assembly during its current session in the event the instrument is concluded.  The draft would call for the Ad Hoc Committee to expedite its work, including its consideration of convening a high-level United Nations conference to formulate a joint organized response on all aspects of terrorism.


By other terms, the Assembly would strongly condemn all acts, methods and practices of terrorism, reiterating that acts intended or calculated to provoke a state of terror in the general public were unjustifiable.  States would again be called upon to adopt measures to prevent terrorism in line with the Charter and other provisions of international law, being reminded of obligations to ensure that perpetrators of terrorist acts were brought to justice.  States would be called upon not to finance, encourage, provide training for, or otherwise support terrorist activities, and to ensure their nationals and others on their territory did not engage in activities on behalf of those intending to commit terrorism-related actions.  They would be urged to ensure that those who took such actions were punished by penalties consistent with the grave nature of such acts.  They would further be urged to become parties to relevant instruments and to cooperate in assisting other States to become parties, being also urged to make the best use of existing mechanisms for preventing terrorism.


Finally, the Assembly has before it a report on revitalization of the Assembly’s work, containing one resolution approved without a vote on 29 November.  That would have the Assembly adopt the Committee’s provisional work programme for the sixty-first session (document A/60/523).


Action on Reports of the Sixth Committee


The Assembly took up the report on the scope of legal protection (document A/60/518) and adopted the resolution contained in the report without a vote.


ADAM THOMSON (United Kingdom), speaking on behalf of the European Union and associates States, said the Union did not agree that the term “peacebuilding” was restricted to conflict or post-conflict situations.  The term could be applied at any stage of the conflict cycle for purposes of the Protocol.  Also, the Protocol extended the application of the 1994 Convention without reference to a “trigger” mechanism of risk or exceptional risk.  The central purpose of the Protocol was to eliminate the need for any such trigger, achieved by extending the scope of application to all peacebuilding operations and operations for the delivery of emergency humanitarian assistance.


Finally, he said he was pleased the Protocol applied equally to operations delivering emergency humanitarian assistance in natural disaster situations.  United Nations and associated personnel needed the protections offered by the Convention and Protocol in such situations.  It was regrettable that some delegations had needed an opt-out Declaration.  Universal accession to the 1994 Convention was emphatically important.  States should rapidly become parties to the Protocol.


KENZO OSHIMA ( Japan) said his delegation welcomed the adoption of the protocol, which, in expanding the scope of legal protection of United Nations and associated personnel, also represented a remarkable step forward in promoting the safety of those people on the ground who dedicated themselves, sometimes at their own risk, to carry out humanitarian duties.   Japan appreciated the contributions of such personnel and had mad its own contributions to assist humanitarian efforts.  Japan would underscore the significance of the action and would stress that it regarded the term “peacebuilding” as used in the Protocol would need to be further clarified through the practice of ongoing and future activities, together with what past experience could teach.


BEN PLAYLE ( Australia) welcomed the adoption of the Protocol after four years of negotiations.   Australia was pleased that the new instrument did away with the requirement in the Convention that the Assembly or the Security Council must make a declaration of “exceptional risk” before the Convention could apply to anything other than a United Nations peacekeeping operation.  Such a declaration had never been made.  He stressed that the term peacebuilding must be interpreted broadly to encompass the whole conflict cycle, such that the Protocol would cover pre-conflict, conflict and post-conflict operations.  He added that Australia would stress that the important question of the relation between the Convention and ratification of the Protocol.


ROSEMARY BANKS ( New Zealand) said her delegation had been pleased by the adoption of the Protocol by consensus.  That delegation had worked closely with other delegations during the final negotiations and the final instrument represented the shared commitment of Member States to expand and support legal protection for United Nations and associated personnel.  She said that New Zealand understood that peacebuilding encompassed all political, development and humanitarian activities aimed at preventing the outbreak, continuation or recurrence of conflict.


GILBERT LAURIN ( Canada) praised Member States’ for the decision taken today.  The Protocol spoke in great detail and would extend the protection of United Nations and associated personnel.  As the recent attacks on humanitarian workers in the Sudan and Uganda showed, humanitarian workers were increasingly at risk, and their protection at all levels needed to be assured.   Canada also shared the European Union’s view on the Protocol’s use of the term “peacebuilding”.


ALVARO SANDOVAL ( Colombia) said that, while his delegation welcomed the text and had joined in the consensus, it would have preferred that the term “peacebuilding” be further defined.   Colombia believed that the lack of definition could lead to a broad range of perceptions.  Such a lack of clarity could also hamper implementation.  “Peacebuilding” was an evolving principle and consideration of the term within the Protocol should be seen as such.   Colombia understood the term as commonly used towards the “building” of peaceful conditions in post-conflict situations, with a view towards establishing sustainable development.


JÜRG LAUBER ( Switzerland) welcomed the conclusion of negotiations on extending the scope of protections under the Convention.  He recalled that his delegation favoured a broad understanding of the term “peacebuilding”, particularly since nothing in the Convention suggested the protection should be limited to post-conflict situations.  In view of the improvements introduced by the Protocol, Switzerland had begun its internal process to ratify the Convention and would urge other States to do likewise.


MANIMUTHU GANDHI ( India) said the protection of the safety and security of United Nations and associated personnel had been a priority for India.  And as a major contributing country, India believed that the language within the Protocol should have clear language.  With that in mind, he said Article I of the Protocol was applicable only to operations which entailed “particular risk” for the United Nations and associated personnel, as stipulated in the third preambular paragraph of the Protocol.  He also said that the term “peacebuilding”, wherever it occurred in the Protocol, was understood to refer only to post-conflict situations, as that term had been traditionally understood within the international community.


ADAM MULAWARMAN TUGIO ( Indonesia) said that it was important to ensure adherence to international standards by both United Nations and associated workers, and host nations.  He welcomed the spirit of flexibility and compromise that had been so evident during the negotiations.


JUANA ELENA RAMOS RODRIGUEZ ( Cuba) said her delegation joined others in welcoming the spirit of compromise that had led to the adoption of the Protocol.  That compromise had been the inclusion of the term “peacebuilding”, despite the fact that there was no internationally agreed definition of that term.  That said, Cuba believed that “peacebuilding” did not apply to pre-conflict situations.


SHIN KAK-SOO (Republic of Korea) noted that the Protocol lifted the cumbersome and impractical trigger mechanism of the 1994 Convention, so as to strengthen the protection of inherently risky work.  He said the paramount concern when States enacted legislation to implement the Protocol should be on ensuring the fullest possible protection for international workers throughout the conflict, including pre-conflict situations.  Safeguarding the Protocol’s integrity should be the common purpose and the goal should be universal ratification.


LAILA TAJ EL DINE ( Venezuela) said her delegation had joined in the consensus, but would stress that it understood that the term peacebuilding was legally vague and ambiguous.  Peacebuilding operations were a new intervention mechanism used by some States to distort the situations on the ground in other States.   Venezuela would dissociate itself from all language in which the term was used throughout the Protocol.


MAHMOUD HMOUD ( Jordan) said his delegation understood the scope of the Protocol as regarded its use of the term “peacebuilding” to include operations beyond conflict and post-conflict situations.  Nothing in the Protocol limited application of the term.


MOSTAFA DOLATYAR ( Iran) said his delegation had joined the consensus, but would stress that the differing views of States on the Protocol’s use of the term “peacebuilding” be given serious consideration.


The Assembly then took up the report on terrorism (document A/60/519) and, without a vote, adopted the resolution it contained.


Venezuela’s representative, speaking in explanation of position after action, referred to the illegitimacy of the Summit Outcome Document mentioned in a preambular paragraph of the resolution.  She said she had other reservations, but the priority consideration in finalizing the text of the comprehensive convention should be on responding to the demands of all people in the world.  It should not purport to set out a new world order.


The Assembly took up the report on the programme of work (document A/60/523) and without a vote adopted the resolution within it.


In concluding remarks JAN ELIASSON ( Sweden), President of the General Assembly, said adoption of the Protocol was an important step in implementing the 2005 World Summit Outcome.  The search for compromises and creative formulas that had led to that success would allow for rapid progress on other important elements of Summit follow-up.


He said the main cause for celebration was the Optional Protocol itself.  Once in force, it would expand the scope of protection to additional categories of field operations and would cover personnel who would continue to face serious threats to their security, including hostage-taking, physical assault and robbery in carrying out their duties, whether in delivering assistance in peacebuilding or in delivering emergency assistance.  Acts against persons involved in such activities were condemnable.  All necessary actions must be taken against such threats, including by strengthening the legal regime for doing so.


Concluding, he said his own experience in Somalia had made clear to him the importance of the protections of the Convention and Protocol.  It would lift morale of those personnel who were risking their lives to serve the vulnerable and needy of the world, and it would be a valuable asset as the Peacebuilding Commission began its work.  All States should sign and ratify the Protocol when it opened for signature in January, and those who had not yet signed and ratified the Convention should do so at the earliest opportunity.


With regard to the terrorism resolution just adopted, he urged all delegations to expedite the work on the comprehensive convention, so as to finalize the text and thereby send a strong message of solidarity and resolve to the world community.  Delegations should also turn attention as a first priority to the elaboration of a counter-terrorism strategy, as the Secretary-General had articulated.  As President of the Assembly, he would be presenting thoughts on the matter early in the next year.


Secretary-General KOFI ANNAN said his job had no greater responsibility than to ensure the protection of those carrying out vital missions for development and peace throughout the world.  Security was a core obligation of Member States, since those being protected were their own nationals.  The Convention was a key legal instrument for providing a secure environment to carry out the work of the United Nations.  The Protocol corrected the serious flaw of needing a declaration of exceptional risk, which was an impractical requirement with no agreed-upon criteria for when it existed.  Political considerations could also influence a technical assessment.  With the Protocol, all United Nations operations were legally protected.


At a time of unprecedented risk in the security environment of United Nations operations, he said it was gratifying that Member States had supported the effort to strengthen that environment, along with the security management system under the leadership of the new Department of Safety and Security.  Significant progress had been made in establishing that new system, notably by establishing liaison and dialogue between United Nations officials and host government security entities.  The outreach of Governments to United Nations officials in their countries would sustain the momentum.


All States should sign and ratify the Convention and its Protocol, he urged.  “Without security”, he concluded, “our work for your people suffers”.


Then, turning to the Committee’s report on measures against terrorism, he reaffirmed that terrorism was one of the grave threats now facing humanity.  Great strides had been made to combat it through the 13 international instruments already elaborated.  However, the conclusion of the Comprehensive Convention would be an important complement to the existing framework.  Every effort must be made to finalize the text during the current Assembly session, as agreed to by the 2005 World Summit.


He said he stood ready to assist efforts to reach a successful outcome early next year.  He was also ready to amplify and further refine the elements of the counter-terrorism strategy he had set out in Madrid last March.


Action on First Committee Texts


First Committee Rapporteur, ELVINA JUSUFAJ ( Albania), introduced the reports of the Committee.


The Assembly first took up the report on objective information on military matters, including transparency of military expenditures (document A/60/451), and adopted the resolution contained therein without a vote.


The resolution contained in the report on developments in the field of information and telecommunications in the context of international security (L.29) (document A/60/452) was adopted by a vote of 177 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with no abstentions (Annex 1).


The Assembly next took up the report on prohibition of the development and manufacture of new types of weapons of mass destruction and new systems of such weapons (document A/60/453) and adopted the resolution by a vote of 180 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 1 abstention ( Israel) (Annex II).


It adopted the resolution contained in the report on question of Antarctica (A/60/454) without a vote.


The Assembly then turned to the report on implementation of the Declaration of the Indian Ocean as a Zone of Peace (document A/60/455), and adopted the resolution by a vote of 132 in favour to 3 against (France, United Kingdom, United States), with 46 abstentions (Annex III).


Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted the resolution contained in the report African Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone Treaty (document A/60/456).


The resolution contained in the report on consolidation of the regime established by the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (Treaty of Tlatelolco) (document A/60/457) was also adopted without a vote.


It then adopted the resolution on verification in all its aspects contained in report A/60/458, without a vote.


It then adopted the resolution contained in the report on the role of science and technology in the context of international security and disarmament (document A/60/459) by a vote of 110 in favour to 53 against, with 17 abstentions (Annex IV).


Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted the resolution contained in the report on establishment of a nuclear-weapon-free zone in the region of the Middle East (document A/60/460).


The resolution contained in the report on conclusion of effective international agreements to assure non-nuclear weapon States against the use or threat of use of nuclear weapons (document A/60/461) was adopted by a vote of 120 in favour to none against, with 59 abstentions (Annex V).


Taking up draft resolution contained in the report on prevention of an arms race in outer space (document A/60/462), the Assembly voted 180 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States), with no abstentions (Annex VI).


The Assembly then turned to the draft texts contained in the report on general and complete disarmament (A/60/463).


It was announced that action would be postponed on draft resolution XXIV on transparency in armaments to a later date, in order to allow time for the review of its programme budget implications by the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary).


Taking up a draft resolution I on compliance with non-proliferation, arms limitation and disarmament agreements, the Assembly adopted it by a vote of 163 in favour to none against, with 10 abstentions (Barbados, Belarus, Cuba, Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Russian Federation, South Africa, Venezuela) (Annex VII).


Turning to draft resolution II entitled Towards a nuclear-weapon-free world: accelerating the implementation of nuclear disarmament commitments, the Assembly first took a separate recorded vote on operative paragraph 4, adopting it by a vote of 158 in favour to 2 against (India, Israel), with 11 abstentions (Annex VIII).


It adopted draft resolution II as a whole by a vote of 153 in favour to 5 against ( France, India, Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 20 abstentions (Annex IX).


Draft resolution III on prohibition of the dumping of radioactive waste was adopted without a vote.


Turning to draft IV on nuclear-weapon-free southern hemisphere and adjacent areas, the Assembly first took a separate recorded vote on the last three words of operative paragraph 5.  It retained them by a vote of 162 in favour to 2 against ( India, Pakistan), with 7 abstentions ( Bhutan, France, Marshall Islands, Myanmar, Russian Federation, United Kingdom, United States) (Annex X).


By a recorded vote of 162 in favour to 1 against (India), with 9 abstentions (Bhutan, France, Israel, Marshall Islands, Pakistan, Russian Federation, Spain, United Kingdom, United States), the Assembly retained the fifth operative paragraph (Annex XI).


It adopted draft IV as a whole by a recorded vote of 167 in favour to 3 against (France, United Kingdom, United States), with 8 abstentions (Bhutan, India, Israel, Marshall Islands, Pakistan, Palau, Russian Federation, Spain) (Annex XII).


Taking up draft V on the promotion of multilateralism in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation, the Assembly adopted it by a vote of 122 in favour to 8 against (Albania, France, Israel, Latvia, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, United Kingdom, United States), with 50 abstentions (Annex XIII).


The Assembly then turned to draft VI on observance of environmental norms in the drafting and implementation of agreements on disarmament and arms control, adopting it by a vote of 176 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 4 abstentions (France, Israel, Palau, United Kingdom) (Annex XIV).


Following that, the Assembly adopted draft VII entitled relationship between disarmament and development, by a vote of 177 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 2 abstentions (France, Israel) (Annex XV).


Draft resolution VIII on the Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation, was adopted by a vote of 158 in favour to 1 against ( Iran), with 11 abstentions (Annex XVI).


It then acted on draft resolutions IX and X, respectively, on regional disarmament and on confidence-building measures in the regional and subregional context, adopting them without a vote.


Next, the Assembly acted on draft resolution XI on renewed determination towards the total elimination of nuclear weapons by a vote of 168 in favour to 2 against (India, United States), with 7 abstentions (Bhutan, China, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Israel, Myanmar, Pakistan) (Annex XVII).


Following that, the Assembly adopted draft XII on transparency and confidence-building measures in outer space by a vote of 178 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 1 abstention ( Israel) (Annex XVIII).


It adopted draft XIII on implementation of the Convention on the prohibition of the development, production, stockpiling and use of chemical weapons and on their destruction without a vote.


By a vote of 177 in favour to 1 against ( United States), with no abstentions the Assembly adopted draft resolution XIV on addressing the humanitarian development impact of the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons (Annex XIX).


Acting without a vote, it adopted draft resolution XV on national legislation on transfer of arms, military equipment and dual-use goods and technology.


By a vote of 113 in favour to 45 against, with 20 abstentions, the Assembly adopted draft resolution XVI on nuclear disarmament (Annex XX).


When it then turned to the draft resolution XVIII entitled follow-up to nuclear disarmament obligations agreed in the 1995 and 2000 Review Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, two delegations explained their positions before the vote.


Speaking in explanation of vote before the vote, JAVIER LOIZA ( Bolivia) said the proliferation of nuclear weapons was a global problem, which had thus far not been taken seriously by the international community.  Indeed, among other things, the threat of terrorist groups obtaining such weapons was very real.  Only through compliance with international instruments, political will, and multilateralism could the international community make any headway against such proliferation.


The representative of Chile said his delegation would abstain in the vote on the text, as it was still not sure about its usefulness.  Chile had co-sponsored draft resolutions in several of the texts under this cluster that it considered to be fully representative of the will of the international community.  While it was clear that all resolutions in the Committee were political, the current text was as well and clearly did not contribute to efforts to address this seriously.  Chile would also recall the lack of consensus this past May at the 2005 review conference of the parties to the NPT.


Next, the Assembly first adopted preambular paragraph 6 by a vote of 78 in favour to 56 against, with 27 abstentions (Annex XXI).


Draft XVIII as a whole was then adopted by a vote of 87 in favour to 56 against, with 26 abstentions (Annex XXII).


Taking up draft XIX on preventing the risk of radiological terrorism, the Assembly adopted the resolution without a vote.


Also acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted draft resolution XX on problems arising from the accumulation of conventional ammunition stockpiles in surplus.


Next, the Assembly adopted draft resolution XXI on conventional arms control at the regional and subregional levels, by a vote of 174 in favour to 1 against ( India), with 1 abstention ( Bhutan) (Annex XXIII).


The Assembly then turned to draft resolution XXII on follow-up to the advisory opinion of the International Court of Justice on the Legality of the Threat or Use of Nuclear Weapons, first adopting operative paragraph 1 by a vote of 165 in favour to 3 against (Israel, Russian Federation, United States), with 4 abstentions (Belarus, France, Latvia, United Kingdom) (Annex XXIV).


It then adopted draft resolution XXII as a whole by a vote of 126 in favour to 29 against, with 24 abstentions (Annex XXV).


Draft XXIII on prevention of the illicit transfer and unauthorized access to and use of man-portable air defence systems was then adopted without a vote.


Also without a vote, it adopted draft resolutions XXV on measures to prevent terrorists from acquiring weapons of mass destruction.


Turning to draft resolution XXVI on reducing nuclear danger, the Assembly adopted it by 115 in favour to 49 against, with 15 abstentions (Annex XXVI).


By a vote of 158 in favour to none against, with 17 abstentions, the Assembly adopted draft resolution XXVII on Implementation of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-personnel Mines and on Their Destruction (Annex XXVII).


The representative of Mongolia said he would have voted in favour of the resolution just adopted had his voting mechanism been working.


The Assembly then adopted draft resolution XXVIII on the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons in all its aspects without a vote.


Also without a vote, it adopted draft resolution XXIX on confidence-building measures in the field of conventional arms.


The Assembly adopted draft decision I on Missiles by a vote of 120 in favour to 2 against ( Israel, United States), with 53 abstentions (Annex XXVIII).


Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted draft decision II on establishment of a nuclear-weapon-free zone in Central Asia.


Next, the Assembly adopted draft decision III on United Nations conference to identify ways of eliminating nuclear dangers in the context of nuclear disarmament, by a vote of 128 in favour to 5 against (France, Israel, Poland, United Kingdom, United States), with 40 abstentions (Annex XXIX).


Acting without a vote, the Assembly approved draft decision IV on convening of the fourth special session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament.


Next, the Assembly adopted draft decision V on the international instrument to enable States to identify and trace, in a timely and reliable manner, illicit small arms and light weapons by a vote of 151 in favour to none against, with 25 abstentions (Annex XXX).


Speaking in explanation of vote after the vote, AMPARO ANGUIANO RODRGUEZ ( Mexico) said his delegation had supported the text on illicit trafficking of small arms and light weapons, but would reiterate that the support for the commitments made during the relevant small arms conference had been slow in coming, or had been significantly watered down.


RI SONG HYUN (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea) said his delegation had voted in favour of the draft on follow-up to the 1995 and 2000 NPT review conferences.  His delegation believed that nuclear weapons posed a serious threat to all nations, and the failure of those review conferences was cause for concern.  He stressed nuclear disarmament was the best way to tackle proliferation.  Many of the concerns nuclear weapon States had about proliferation would be removed if they destroyed their own weapons and stockpiles.


YURI ARIEL GALA LOPEZ ( Cuba) said his delegation was dissatisfied with the content of the text on arms limitation and disarmament.  Not only were some of the positive elements of previous iterations of that text omitted, some controversial wording had been inserted.  Cuba had received no clear reasoning for the insertion of such language.  Cuba had always defended the need to promote multilateralism and was convinced of the need for States parties to international disarmament and proliferation to comply with the tenets of those instruments without selectivity.


EMAD BEN-SHABAN ( Libya) said his delegation had abstained in the vote on implementation of the convention on stockpiling because Libya had not acceded to that instrument.  The convention did not address the concerns of many small countries that could not protect themselves.  Neither did it address the need for large countries to help developing countries remove landmines.


The representative of France said that his delegation had abstained in the vote on multilateralism in disarmament.


The representative of Uruguay said his delegation had abstained in the vote on the text as a whole on follow-up to the 1995 and 2000 review conferences.


Taking up the remaining reports of the First Committee in the afternoon, the Assembly first adopted drafts contained in the report A/60/464, without a vote.  They were on, respectively:  the United Nations regional centres for peace and disarmament (I); United Nations Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean (II); United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Asia and the Pacific (III); United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Africa (IV); and regional confidence-building measures: activities of the United Nations Standing Advisory Committee on Security Questions in Central Africa (V).


It next adopted draft resolution VI in that report (A/60/464), on convention on the prohibition of the use of nuclear weapons, by a recorded vote of 111 in favour to 49 against, with 13 abstentions (Annex XXXI).


When the Assembly turned to the three texts in report A/60/465, GOLI AMERI ( United States) said her delegation would not participate in the vote on the report of the Disarmament Commission.


Then, acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted the three texts:  draft I on the twenty-fifth anniversary of the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research; draft II on Report of the Conference on Disarmament; and draft III on Report on the Disarmament Commission.


Next, the Assembly turned to the draft resolution contained in report A/60/466 on the risk of nuclear proliferation in the Middle East.  It took a separate recorded vote on preambular paragraph 6, deciding to retain it by 162 in favour to 2 against ( India, Israel), with 6 abstentions ( Bhutan, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Mauritius, Pakistan, United States) (Annex XXXII).


It adopted the draft as a whole by a vote of 164 in favour to 5 against (Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, United States), with 5 abstentions (Australia, Cameroon, Ethiopia, India, Tonga) (Annex XXXIII).


Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted the draft resolution on Convention on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Certain Conventional Weapons Which May Be Deemed to Be Excessively Injurious or to Have Indiscriminate Effects contained in the report A/60/467.


Also without a vote, it adopted the resolution on strengthening of security and cooperation in the Mediterranean Region, in report A/60/468.


The draft resolution contained in report A/60/469 on the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) was adopted by a vote of 172 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 4 abstentions (Colombia, India, Mauritius, Syria) (Annex XXXIV).


The resolution contained in report A/60/470 on the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on Their Destruction (L.33/Rev.1) was adopted without a vote.


Also without a vote, the Assembly adopted the decision contained in report A/60/471 on review of the implementation of the Declaration on the Strengthening of International Security.


On the revitalization of the Assembly’s work, it adopted the report of its First Committee (document A/60/524).


Action on Fourth Committee Texts


MUHAMMAD SHAHRUL NIZZAM UMAR (Brunei Darussalam), Rapporteur of the Fourth Committee, introduced that body’s reports, saying the Committee had held in-depth interactive dialogue sessions with the Under-Secretary-General for Communications and Public Information on the item “Questions relating to information”, and with the Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations on the item “Comprehensive review of peacekeeping operations in all their aspects”.  The Committee had also benefited from the interactive dialogue session with the Commissioner-General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA).  That format had allowed for the active participation of delegations in the Committee’s deliberations and it should be improved in the future.


The Assembly first took up the report on Assistance in mine action (document A/59/473).


ALI ALI ( Sudan) said his country had suffered from mines and explosive debris and was aware of the tragedies resulting from that problem.  There was an urgent need for the international community to provide as much assistance as possible to countries that were trying to cope with the problem, by helping them to build national capacity and ensuring that peace prevailed.  The Sudanese delegation had always supported the draft resolution on assistance on mine action, but for reasons beyond its control, it had not been among the co-sponsors before the Fourth Committee had approved the draft.  However, the delegation wished to emphasize that it was among the co-sponsors, although it had not signed the draft.


The Assembly then adopted the resolution on assistance in mine action, contained in the report, by consensus.


Taking up the report on Effects of atomic radiation (document A/59/474) the Assembly adopted the text contained therein, also without a vote.


The Assembly then adopted, again without a vote, the resolution contained in the report on peaceful uses of outer space (document A/59/475).


Turning to the four draft resolutions contained in the Fourth Committee’s report on the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (document A/59/476), it adopted draft resolution I, on “Assistance to Palestine refugees”, by a recorded vote of 161 in favour to 1 against ( Israel), with 11 abstentions (Annex XXXV).


It then adopted draft resolution II, “Persons displaced as a result of the June 1967 and subsequent hostilities”, by a recorded vote of 161 in favour to 6 against (Grenada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, United States), with 5 abstentions (Albania, Dominican Republic, Tuvalu, Uganda, Vanuatu) (Annex XXXVI).


Taking up draft resolution III, “Operations of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East”, the Assembly adopted it by a recorded 159 votes in favour to 6 against (Grenada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, United States), with 3 abstentions (Albania, Cameroon, Uganda) (Annex XXXVII).


By a recorded vote of 160 in favour to 6 against (Israel, Grenada, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, United States), with 3 abstentions (Albania, Cameroon, Uganda), the Assembly then adopted draft resolution IV, “Palestine refugees’ properties and their revenues” (Annex XXXVIII).


Acting by consensus, the Assembly then adopted the draft decision on expansion of the Advisory Commission on UNRWA.


The Assembly then took up the Fourth Committee’s report on the report of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories (document A/60/477), adopting draft resolution I, “Report of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories”, by a recorded vote of 86 in favour to 10 against (Australia, Canada, Grenada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, Tuvalu, United States), with 74 abstentions (Annex XXXIX).


Taking up draft resolution II, “Applicability of the Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War, of 12 August 1949, to the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and the other occupied Arab territories”, the Assembly then adopted it by a recorded vote of 158 in favour to 6 against (Grenada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, United States), with 7 abstentions (Albania, Australia, Cameroon, Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Haiti, Uganda) (Annex XL).


The Assembly then took up draft resolution III, “Israeli settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and the occupied Syrian Golan”, adopting that text by a recorded vote of 153 in favour to 7 against (Australia, Grenada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, United States), with 10 abstentions (Albania, Cameroon, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Haiti, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Tonga) (Annex XLI).


Taking up draft resolution IV, “Israeli practices affecting the human rights of the Palestinian people and other Arabs of the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem”, the Assembly adopted that text by a recorded a vote of 148 in favour to 7 against (Australia, Grenada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, United States), with 17 abstentions (Annex XLII).


By a recorded vote of 156 in favour to against 1 ( Israel), with 15 abstentions, the Assembly then adopted draft resolution V, “The occupied Syrian Golan” (Annex XLIII).


Explanation of Vote


HOSSEIN MALEKI (Iran), speaking in explanation of position after the vote, said he had joined others in voting for the text in hopes of easing the plight of the Palestinian people, which was caused by the occupying Israeli regime.  Their situation could be resolved through justice, an end to discrimination, an end to the occupation of all Palestinian territories, the return of refugees and the establishment of a democratic Palestinian State, with Al Quds Al Sharif as its capital.


The Assembly then took note of the Committee’s report on its Comprehensive review of the whole question of peacekeeping operations in all their aspects (document A/60/478).


Turning to the report on Questions relating to information (document A/60/479), it then took action on the two texts contained in it, adopting draft resolution A -- “Information in the service of humanity” -- and draft resolution B -- “United Nations public information policies and activities” –- without a vote.


Also by consensus, the Assembly then adopted the draft decision on the increase in the membership of the Committee on Information.


Taking up the Committee’s report on Information from Non-Self-Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73e of the Charter of the United Nations (document A/60/480), the Assembly adopted the draft resolution contained in it by a recorded vote of 169 in favour to none against, with 5 abstentions (Albania France, Israel, United Kingdom, United States) (Annex XLIV).


It then turned to the report on Economic and other activities which affect the interests of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories (document A/60/481), adopting that text by a recorded 169 votes in favour to 1 against ( United States), with 3 abstentions ( Albania, France, United Kingdom) (Annex XLV).


The Assembly then took up the report on implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations (document A/60/482).


FAYSSAL MEKDAD ( Syria), Rapporteur of the Special Committee on Decolonization, introduced oral amendments to operative paragraphs 13 and 14 of the draft, proposing that operative paragraph 13 be deleted and that the text be renumbered accordingly.  Former operative paragraph 14 (new paragraph 13) would read as follows:


“13.  Requests the Chairman of the Special Committee on the Situation with regard to the Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples to continue to maintain close contact on these matters with the President of the Economic and Social Council”.

He said the reason for the amendments was to synchronize the text of the Assembly resolution with that of the resolution on the same subject adopted last July by the Economic and Social Council.  The amendments had been agreed upon in informal consultations between interested delegations of the Special Committee and the European Union, and it was the wish of the interested parties that the amendments be adopted without a vote. 


The Assembly first adopted the proposed oral amendments, then adopted he text by a recorded vote of 123 in favour to none against, with 50 abstentions (Annex XLVI).


Explanation of Vote


MICHELLE JOSEPH (Saint Lucia), speaking in explanation of position after the vote, said her delegation had voted in favour of the resolution on the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Peoples by specialized agencies, because it provided for assistance from the wider United Nations system to the Non-Self-Governing Territories.  A number of United Nations bodies already provided for the participation of those Territories in their work, while others had granted them observer status or associate membership, with the concurrence of the administering Powers concerned.  The resolution merely requested those United Nations bodies that had not made the necessary adjustments, within their respective mandates, to assist those Territories.  Such a request paid due respect to the respective mandates of those agencies, so any such concerns were unwarranted. 


The General Assembly routinely adopted resolutions, by consensus, which called on United Nations bodies and other agencies to undertake certain actions, she said.  The resolution on providing assistance from the specialized agencies to those Territories was no different from those resolutions, which had enjoyed consensus.  If the international community was serious about assisting the Territories to realize the right to self-determination, then the entire United Nations system should do its part by providing assistance and access for those Territories, in line with consensus resolutions consistently adopted by the Assembly.


Action


The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, the draft resolution contained in the report on Offers by Member States of study and training facilities for inhabitants of Non-Self-Governing Territories (document A/60/483).


Taking up the Fourth Committee’s report on Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples (document A/60/472), the Assembly took action on its seven draft resolutions and one draft decision.


Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted draft resolution I, “Question of Western Sahara”.


It then adopted, also without a vote, draft resolution II, “Question of New Caledonia”.

Acting again without a vote, it then adopted draft resolution III, “Question of Tokelau”.


Also without a vote, it then adopted draft resolution IV, “Questions of American Samoa, Anguilla, Bermuda, the British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Guam, Montserrat, Pitcairn, Saint Helena, Turks and Caicos Islands and the United States Virgin Islands”.


Taking up draft resolution V, “Dissemination of information on decolonization”, the Assembly adopted that text by a recorded 167 votes in favour to 3 against ( Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 2 abstentions ( Albania, France) (Annex XLVII).


It then adopted, by a recorded vote of 166 in favour to 3 against ( Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 4 abstentions ( Albania, Belgium, France, Germany), draft resolution VI on “Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples” (Annex XLVIII).


The Assembly then took up draft resolution VII on the “Second International Decade for the Eradication of Colonialism”, adopting it by a recorded vote of 133 in favour to 3 against (Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 36 abstentions (Annex XLVIX).


Turning to a draft decision on the “Question of Gibraltar”, the Assembly adopted that text without a vote.


Explanation of Vote


Ms. JOSEPH ( Saint Lucia) said her delegation had joined the consensus on resolution IV regarding small Territories, because it reiterated the call to the international community, including the United Nations system, to provide assistance towards their self-determination.  Like all resolutions approved by the Fourth Committee, that text had been approved after serious consideration and analysis of the situation on the ground.  The input of the non-self-governing populations was most crucial and, accordingly, the key to the realization of the General Assembly’s decolonization mandate lay in the implementation of the resolution by the institutions of the United Nations and Member States alike.


She said that decolonization resolutions could be strengthened even further through the resumed formal participation of the administering Powers in the work of the Special Committee on Decolonization.  Saint Lucia looked forward to the initiation of further dialogue on that issue next year.


In its final action on the Fourth Committee drafts, the Assembly took note of that body’s report on Revitalization of the work of the General Assembly (document A/60/525).


As it turned to the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary) reports, the Assembly adopted, without a vote, a draft resolution on the financing of the United Nations Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC) (document A/60/574).


The Assembly then adopted, also without a vote, a draft resolution on the financing of the United Nations Mission in the Sudan (UNMIS) (document A/60/562).

While initially it had been decided that the Assembly would recess on Tuesday, 13 December, with some work remaining to be done during the current part of the sixtieth session, the Assembly then decided to postpone the date of its recess to Tuesday, 20 December.


ANNEX I


Vote on Information and International Security


The draft resolution on developments in the field of information and telecommunications in the context of international security (document A/60/452) was adopted by a recorded vote of 177 in favour to 1 against, with no abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Absent:  Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Mozambique, Nauru, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Swaziland, Tonga.


ANNEX II


Vote on Prohibition on New Mass Destruction Weapons


The draft resolution on the prohibition of the development and manufacture of new types of weapons of mass destruction (document A/60/453) was adopted by a recorded vote of 180 in favour to 1 against, with 1 abstention, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Abstain:  Israel.


Absent:  Angola, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Swaziland.


ANNEX III


Vote on Indian Ocean


The draft resolution on implementation of the Declaration of the Indian Ocean as a zone of peace (document A/60/455) was adopted by a recorded vote of 132 in favour to 3 against, with 46 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  France, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey.


Absent:  Angola, Chad, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Swaziland.


ANNEX IV


Vote on Science and Technology


The draft resolution on the role of science and technology in the context of international security and disarmament (document A/60/459) was adopted by a recorded vote of 110 in favour to 53 against, with 17 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Brazil, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Paraguay, Russian Federation, Samoa, South Africa, Tajikistan, Tonga, Ukraine, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.


Absent:  Angola, Chad, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Solomon Islands, Swaziland.


ANNEX V


Vote on Assurances for Non-Nuclear Weapon States


The draft resolution the conclusion of effective international arrangements to assure non-nuclear-weapon States against the use or threat of use of nuclear weapons (document A/60/461) was adopted by a recorded vote of 120 in favour to none against, with 59 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  None.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States.


Absent:  Angola, Chad, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Solomon Islands, Swaziland, Tonga.


ANNEX VI


Vote on Outer Space Arms Race


The draft resolution on the prevention of an arms race in outer space (document A/60/462) was adopted by a recorded vote of 180 in favour to 2 against, with no abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel, United States.


Absent:  Angola, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Swaziland.


ANNEX VII


Vote on Compliance with Disarmament Agreements


The draft resolution on compliance with non-proliferation, arms limitation and disarmament agreements (document A/60/463 I) was adopted by a recorded vote of 163 in favour to none against, with 10 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  None.


Abstain:  Barbados, Belarus, Cuba, Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Russian Federation, South Africa, Venezuela.


Absent:  Angola, Chad, China, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Nauru, Pakistan, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Swaziland, Tonga, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam.


ANNEX VIII


Vote on Operative Paragraph 4/Nuclear-Weapon-Free World


Operative paragraph 4 of the draft resolution “Towards a Nuclear-Weapon-Free World” (document A/60/463 II) was adopted by a recorded vote of 158 in favour to 2 against, with 11 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  India, Israel.


Abstain:  Australia, Bhutan, Cameroon, Federated States of Micronesia, France, Jamaica, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Pakistan, United Kingdom, United States.


Absent:  Angola, Chad, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Kiribati, Monaco, Nauru, Palau, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Swaziland, Togo, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Viet Nam.


ANNEX IX


Vote on Towards a Nuclear-Weapon-Free World


The draft resolution entitled “Towards a Nuclear-Weapon-Free World” (document A/60/463 II) was adopted by a recorded vote of 153 in favour to 5 against, with 20 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Gabon, Germany, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Iceland, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  France, India, Israel, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Australia, Belarus, Bhutan, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Georgia, Greece, Hungary, Latvia, Pakistan, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Slovenia, Spain, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.


Absent:  Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Equatorial Guinea, Seychelles, Gambia, Monaco, Swaziland, Nauru, Turkmenistan, Chad, Kiribati, Vanuatu, Rwanda.


ANNEX X


Vote on ‘And South Asia ’


The words ‘and South Asia’ in operative paragraph 5 of the draft resolution on a nuclear-weapon-free southern hemisphere (document A/60/463 IV) was retained by a recorded vote of 162 in favour to 2 against, with 7 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  India, Pakistan.


Abstain:  Bhutan, France, Marshall Islands, Myanmar, Russian Federation, United Kingdom, United States.


Absent:  Angola, Chad, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gabon, Gambia, Israel, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Monaco, Nauru, Palau, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Swaziland, Syria, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu.


ANNEX XI


Vote on Operative Paragraph 5/Southern Hemisphere


Operative paragraph 5 of the draft resolution on a nuclear-weapon-free southern hemisphere (document A/60/463 IV) was adopted by a recorded vote of 162 in favour to 1 against, with 9 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  India.


Abstain:  Bhutan, France, Israel, Marshall Islands, Pakistan, Russian Federation, Spain, United Kingdom, United States.


Absent:  Angola, Central African Republic, Chad, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gabon, Gambia, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Monaco, Nauru, Palau, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Swaziland, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Venezuela.


ANNEX XII


Vote on Nuclear-Weapon-Free Southern Hemisphere


The draft resolution on a nuclear-weapon-free southern hemisphere (document A/60/463 IV) was adopted by a recorded vote of 167 in favour to 3 against, with 8 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  France, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Bhutan, India, Israel, Marshall Islands, Pakistan, Palau, Russian Federation, Spain.


Absent:  Angola, Chad, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gambia, Kiribati, Monaco, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Swaziland.


ANNEX XIII


Vote on Multilateralism


The draft resolution on the promotion of multilateralism in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation (document A/60/463 V) was adopted by a recorded vote of 122 in favour to 8 against, with 50 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Federated States of Micronesia, France, Israel, Latvia, Marshall Islands, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, Vanuatu.


Absent:  Angola, Chad, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Swaziland, Tonga.


ANNEX XIV


Vote on Environmental Norms


The draft resolution on the observance of environmental norms in the drafting and implementation of agreements on disarmament and arms control (document A/60/463 VI) was adopted by a recorded vote of 176 in favour to 1 against, with 4 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Abstain:  France, Israel, Palau, United Kingdom.


Absent:  Angola, Chad, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Swaziland.


ANNEX XV


Vote on Disarmament and Development


The draft resolution on the relationship between disarmament and development (document A/60/463 VII) was adopted by a recorded vote of 177 in favour to 1 against, with 2 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Abstain:  France, Israel.


Absent:  Angola, Chad, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Nauru, Pakistan, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Swaziland.


ANNEX XVI


Vote on Hague Code of Conduct


The draft resolution on The Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation (document A/60/463 VIII) was adopted by a recorded vote of 158 in favour to 1 against, with 11 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Iran.


Abstain:  Algeria, Cuba, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Lebanon, Malaysia, Mauritius, Mexico, Pakistan, Syria.


Absent:  Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahrain, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Iraq, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Mauritania, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saudi Arabia, Seychelles, Swaziland, United Arab Emirates, Viet Nam.


ANNEX XVII


Vote on Total Elimination of Nuclear Weapons


The draft resolution on the renewed determination towards the total elimination of nuclear weapons (document A/60/463 XI) was adopted by a recorded vote of 168 in favour to 2 against, with 7 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  India, United States.


Abstain:  Bhutan, China, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Israel, Myanmar, Pakistan.


Absent:  Angola, Benin, Chad, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Nauru, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Swaziland, Trinidad and Tobago.


ANNEX XVIII


Vote on Transparency in Outer Space Activities


The draft resolution on transparency and confidence-building measures in outer space activities (document A/60/463 XII) was adopted by a recorded vote of 178 in favour to 1 against, with 1 abstention, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Abstain:  Israel.


Absent:  Angola, Chad, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Swaziland, Tonga.


ANNEX XIX


Vote on Humanitarian Impact of Small Arms


The draft resolution on addressing the humanitarian impact of the illicit manufacture, transfer and circulation of small arms and light weapons and their excessive accumulation (document A/60/463 XIV) was adopted by a recorded vote of 177 in favour to 1 against, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Abstain:  None.


Absent:  Angola, Chad, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Swaziland, Tonga, Turkmenistan.


ANNEX XX


Vote on Nuclear Disarmament


The draft resolution on nuclear disarmament (document A/60/463 XVI) was adopted by a recorded vote of 113 in favour to 45 against, with 20 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Israel, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, India, Ireland, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Malta, Mauritius, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Russian Federation, Sweden, Tajikistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan.


Absent:  Angola, Chad, Comoros, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Indonesia, Kiribati, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Swaziland, Turkmenistan.


ANNEX XXI


Vote on Preambular Paragraph 6/Nuclear Disarmament Obligations


The sixth preambular paragraph of the draft resolution on a follow-up to nuclear disarmament obligations agreed in the 1995 and 2000 review conferences of the parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) (document A/60/463 XVIII) was retained by a recorded vote of 78 in favour to 56 against, with 27 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Egypt, Fiji, Grenada, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Vanuatu.


Abstain:  Argentina, Armenia, Belarus, Bhutan, Bolivia, Burundi, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Honduras, Liberia, Malawi, Mauritius, Nicaragua, Niger, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Russian Federation, Tajikistan, Uruguay


Absent:  Afghanistan, Angola, Azerbaijan, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Comoros, Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Kiribati, Kuwait, Lesotho, Madagascar, Nauru, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Swaziland, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Tuvalu.


ANNEX XXII


Vote on Nuclear Disarmament Obligations


The draft resolution on follow-up to nuclear disarmament obligations agreed to the 1995 and 2000 review conferences of the parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) (document A/60/463 XVIII) was adopted by a recorded vote of 87 in favour to 56 against, with 26 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Egypt, Eritrea, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Vanuatu.


Abstain:  Argentina, Armenia, Belarus, Bolivia, Burundi, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Honduras, India, Liberia, Mexico, Nicaragua, Niger, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Angola, Azerbaijan, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Kiribati, Madagascar, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Swaziland, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Tuvalu.


ANNEX XXIII


Vote on Regional Conventional Arms Control


The draft resolution on conventional arms control at the regional and subregional levels (document A/60/463 XXI) was adopted by a recorded vote of 174 in favour to 1 against, with 1 abstention, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  India.


Abstain:  Bhutan.


Absent:  Angola, Chad, Comoros, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Swaziland, Viet Nam.


ANNEX XXIV


Vote on Operative Paragraph 1/International Court of Justice


Operative paragraph 1 in the draft resolution on follow-up to the advisory opinion of the International Court of Justice (document A/60/463 XXII) was adopted by a recorded vote of 165 in favour to 3 against, with 4 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel, Russian Federation, United States.


Abstain:  Belarus, France, Latvia, United Kingdom.


Absent:  Angola, Chad, Comoros, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gabon, Gambia, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Nauru, Palau, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Swaziland, Togo, Tonga, Tuvalu.


ANNEX XXV


Vote on International Court of Justice Advisory Opinion


The draft resolution on follow-up to the advisory opinion of the International Court of Justice on the legality of the threat or use of nuclear weapons (document A/60/463 XXII) was adopted by a recorded vote of 126 in favour to 29 against, with 24 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Germany, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Georgia, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Israel, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russian Federation, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Andorra, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Liechtenstein, Marshall Islands, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Serbia and Montenegro, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Uzbekistan.


Absent:  Angola, Equatorial Guinea, Seychelles, Gambia, Benin, Swaziland, Nauru, Chad, Comoros, Kiribati, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis.


ANNEX XXVI


Vote on Reducing Nuclear Danger


The draft resolution on reducing nuclear danger (document A/60/463 XXVI) was adopted by a recorded vote of 115 in favour to 49 against, with 15 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, China, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Paraguay, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Russian Federation, Tajikistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan.


Absent:  Angola, Chad, Comoros, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Nauru, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Swaziland.


ANNEX XXVII


Vote on Anti-Personnel Mines


The draft resolution on implementation of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and/or Their Destruction (document A/60/463 XXVII) was adopted by a recorded vote of 158 in favour to none against, with 17 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Latvia, Lesotho, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  None.


Abstain:  Cuba, Egypt, India, Iran, Israel, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Libya, Myanmar, Pakistan, Palau, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Syria, United States, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam.


Absent:  Angola, Chad, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Mongolia, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saudi Arabia, Seychelles, Swaziland.


ANNEX XXVIII


Vote on Missiles


The draft decision on missiles (document A/60/463) was adopted by a recorded vote of 120 in favour to 2 against, with 53 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, United Kingdom, Vanuatu.


Absent:  Angola, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gambia, Kiribati, Madagascar, Nauru, Niger, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Swaziland.


ANNEX XXIX


Vote on Eliminating Nuclear Dangers


The draft decision on a United Nations conference to identify ways of eliminating nuclear dangers in the context of nuclear disarmament (document A/60/463) was adopted by a recorded vote of 128 in favour to 5 against, with 40 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Cyprus, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  France, Israel, Poland, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Palau, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey.


Absent:  Angola, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gambia, Kiribati, Monaco, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Swaziland, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu.


ANNEX XXX


Vote on Tracing Small Arms


The draft decision on an international instrument to enable States to identify and trace, in a timely and reliable manner, illicit small arms and light weapons (document A/60/463) was adopted by a recorded vote of 151 in favour to none against, with 25 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, China, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Egypt, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  None.


Abstain:  Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Barbados, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela.


Absent:  Angola, Chad, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Swaziland, Tonga, Turkmenistan.


ANNEX XXXI


Vote on Convention Prohibiting Nuclear Weapon Use


The draft resolution on a convention on the prohibition of the use of nuclear weapons (document A/60/464) was adopted by a recorded vote of 111 in favour to 49 against, with 13 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Russian Federation, Tajikistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan.


Absent:  Sao Tome and Principe, Equatorial Guinea, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Gambia, Swaziland, Nauru, Guinea-Bissau, Tuvalu, Chad, Papua New Guinea, Uganda, Comoros, Kiribati, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Democratic Republic of the Congo.


ANNEX XXXII


Vote on Preambular Paragraph 6/Middle East


The sixth preambular paragraph of the draft resolution on the risk of nuclear proliferation in the Middle East (document A/60/466) was adopted by a recorded vote of 162 in favour to 2 against, with 6 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  India, Israel.


Abstain:  Bhutan, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Mauritius, Pakistan, United States.


Absent:  Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gabon, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Solomon Islands, Swaziland, Tonga, Uganda.


ANNEX XXXIII


Vote on Middle East Nuclear Proliferation


The draft resolution on the risk of Middle East nuclear proliferation (document A/60/466) was adopted by a recorded vote of 164 in favour to 5 against, with 5 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Australia, Cameroon, Ethiopia, India, Tonga.


Absent:  Burundi, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Kiribati, Nauru, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Solomon Islands, Swaziland, Uganda.


ANNEX XXXIV


Vote on Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty


The draft resolution on the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (document A/60/469) was adopted by a recorded vote of 172 in favour to 1 against, with 4 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Abstain:  Colombia, India, Mauritius, Syria.


Absent:  Chad, Comoros, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Swaziland, Uganda.


ANNEX XXXV


Vote on Assistance to Palestine Refugees


The draft resolution on assistance to Palestine refugees (document A/60/476) was adopted by a recorded vote of 161 in favour to 1 against, with 11 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel.


Abstain:  Albania, Cameroon, Federated States of Micronesia, Grenada, Haiti, Marshall Islands, Palau, Tuvalu, Uganda, United States, Vanuatu.


Absent:  Angola, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Madagascar, Nauru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Swaziland, Uruguay.


ANNEX XXXVI


Vote on Persons Displaced by Hostilities


The draft resolution on persons displaced as a result of the June 1967 and subsequent hostilities (document A/60/476) was adopted by a recorded vote of 161 in favour to 6 against, with 5 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Federated States of Micronesia, Grenada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Dominican Republic, Tuvalu, Uganda, Vanuatu.


Absent:  Angola, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Haiti, Kiribati, Madagascar, Malawi, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Swaziland.


ANNEX XXXVII


Vote on Operations of UNRWA


The draft resolution on operations of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) (document A/60/476) was adopted by a recorded vote of 159 in favour to 6 against, with 3 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Federated States of Micronesia, Grenada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Cameroon, Uganda.


Absent:  Angola, Bahrain, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Haiti, Kiribati, Madagascar, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Swaziland, Tuvalu, Vanuatu.


ANNEX XXXVIII


Vote on Palestine Refugees Properties


The draft resolution on Palestine refugees’ properties and their revenues (document A/60/476) was adopted by a recorded vote of 160 in favour to 6 against, with 3 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Federated States of Micronesia, Grenada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Cameroon, Uganda.


Absent:  Angola, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Haiti, Kiribati, Madagascar, Malawi, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Swaziland, Tuvalu, Vanuatu.


ANNEX XXXIX


Vote on Work of Special Committee


The draft resolution on the work of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights o the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories (document A/60/477) was adopted by a recorded vote of 86 in favour to 10 against, with 74 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chile, China, Colombia, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Dominica, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Qatar, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Australia, Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Grenada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, Tuvalu, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Austria, Bahamas, Belgium, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tonga, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Vanuatu.


Absent:  Sao Tome and Principe, Angola, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Swaziland, Timor-Leste.


ANNEX XL


Vote on Applicability of Geneva Convention


The draft resolution on Applicability of the Geneva Convention relative to the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and the other occupied Arab territories (document A/60/477) was adopted by a recorded vote of 158 in favour to 6 against, with 7 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Federated States of Micronesia, Grenada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Australia, Cameroon, Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Haiti, Uganda.


Absent:  Angola, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Madagascar, Malawi, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Swaziland, Tuvalu, Vanuatu.


ANNEX XLI


Vote on Israeli Settlements


The draft resolution on Israeli settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territories, including East Jerusalem, and the occupied Syrian Golan (document A/60/477) was adopted by a recorded vote of 153 in favour to 7 against, with 10 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Australia, Federated States of Micronesia, Grenada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Cameroon, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Haiti, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Uganda


Absent:  Sao Tome and Principe, Angola, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Madagascar, Malawi, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Swaziland, Tuvalu, Vanuatu.


ANNEX XLII


Vote on Israeli Practices


The draft resolution on Israeli practices affecting the human rights of the Palestinian people and other Arabs of the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem (document A/60/477) was adopted by a recorded vote of 148 in favour to 7 against, with 17 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Australia, Federated States of Micronesia, Grenada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Palau, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Cameroon, Canada, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Iceland, Nicaragua, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Uganda, Vanuatu.


Absent:  Angola, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Madagascar, Malawi, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Swaziland.


ANNEX XLIII


Vote on Occupied Syrian Golan


The draft resolution on the occupied Syrian Golan (document A/60/477) was adopted by a recorded vote of 156 in favour to 1 against, with 15 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel.


Abstain:  Albania, Australia, Cameroon, Dominican Republic, Federated States of Micronesia, Grenada, Haiti, Marshall Islands, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Tonga, Tuvalu, Uganda, United States, Vanuatu.


Absent:  Angola, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Madagascar, Malawi, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Swaziland.


ANNEX XLIV


Vote on Information from Non-Self-Governing Territories


The draft resolution on the information from Non-Self-Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73e of the Charter of the United Nations (document A/60/480) was adopted by a recorded vote of 169 in favour to none against, with 5 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  None.


Abstain:  Albania, France, Israel, United Kingdom, United States.


Absent:   Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Monaco, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Swaziland, Uzbekistan.


ANNEX XLV


Vote on Economic and Other Activities


The draft resolution on economic and other activities which affect the interests of people of the Non-Self-Governing Territories (document A/60/481) was adopted by a recorded vote of 169 in favour to 1 against, with 3 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Abstain:  Albania, France, United Kingdom.


Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gambia, Israel, Kiribati, Monaco, Nauru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Swaziland, Uzbekistan.


ANNEX XLVI


Vote on Implementation of Declaration of Specialized Agencies


The draft resolution on the implementation of the granting of independence to colonial countries (document A/60/472) was adopted by a recorded vote of 123 in favour to none against, with 50 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  None.


Abstain:  Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belgium, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom.


Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gambia, Kiribati, Nauru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Swaziland, Turkmenistan, United States, Uzbekistan.


ANNEX XLVII


Vote on Dissemination of Information


The draft resolution on dissemination of information on decolonization (document A/60/472) was adopted by a recorded vote of 167 in favour to 3 against, with 2 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, France.


Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gambia, Kiribati, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Swaziland, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan.


ANNEX XLVIII


Vote on Implementation of Declaration on Independence


The draft resolution on implementation of the granting of independence to colonial countries and peoples (document A/60/472) was adopted by a recorded vote of 166 in favour to 3 against, with 4 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Gabon, Georgia, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Belgium, France, Germany.


Absent:  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gambia, Kiribati, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Swaziland, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan.


ANNEX XLIX


Vote on Second International Decade


The draft resolution on the Second International Decade for the Eradication of Colonialism (document A/60/472) was adopted by a recorded vote of 133 in favour to 3 against, with 36 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Cuba, Cyprus, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel, United Kingdom, United States.


Abstain:  Albania, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Palau, Poland, Republic of Moldova, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine.


Absent:  Angola, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Comoros, Côte d’Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Kiribati, Nauru, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Swaziland, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan.


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For information media • not an official record