28/01/2003
Press Release
SC/7648



Security Council

4694th Meeting (PM)


SECURITY COUNCIL EXPRESSES STRONG SUPPORT FOR ‘KIMBERLEY PROCESS’,


AIMED AT HALTING ILLICIT DIAMOND TRADE USED TO FUEL CONFLICTS


Resolution 1459 (2003) Adopted Unanimously


Noting with deep concern the linkage between the illicit trade in rough diamonds and the fuelling of armed conflicts, the Security Council this afternoon expressed its strong support for the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme -- adopted at the Interlaken Conference on 5 November 2002 -- as well as the ongoing process to refine and implement the regime, as a valuable contribution against trafficking in conflict diamonds.


Unanimously adopting resolution 1459 (2003), the Council also stressed that the widest possible participation in the Certification Scheme, launched on 1 January, was essential and should be encouraged and facilitated, and urged all Member States to actively participate. 


In addition, the Council welcomed the voluntary system of industry self-regulation, as described in the Interlaken Declaration.  That system will help facilitate the full traceability of rough diamond transactions by relevant government authorities and the effective implementation of the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme.


Chaired by South Africa, the Kimberley Process had its origins in the decision of southern African countries to take action to stop the flow of “conflict” diamonds to the markets, while at the same time protecting the legitimate diamond industry.  The Kimberley Process involves more than

30 governments, the European Community, the diamond industry and civil society  and has been establishing minimum acceptable international standards for national certification schemes relating to trade in rough diamonds.


The meeting began at 5:40 p.m. and adjourned at 5:42 p.m.


Resolution


The full text of resolution 1459 (2003) reads, as follows:


The Security Council,


Noting with deep concern the linkage between the illicit trade in rough diamonds from certain regions of the world and the fuelling of armed conflicts that affect international peace and security,


Recalling all relevant resolutions of the Security Council to control the illicit trade in rough diamonds, including 1173 (1998) of 12 June 1998, 1306 (2000) of 5 July 2000, 1343 (2001) of 7 March 2001, 1385 (2001) of 19 December 2001, and 1408 (2002) of 6 May 2002,


Highlighting in particular resolution 1295 (2000) of 18 April 2000 which welcomed the proposal that led to the adoption of the Interlaken Declaration of 5 November 2002 on the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme for Rough Diamonds,


Highlighting further the importance of conflict prevention through efforts to hinder the fuelling of conflicts by illicit trade in rough diamonds, which is the very nature of the Kimberley Process,


Noting in particular the importance of the major diamond producing, and trading, and processing countries participating in the Kimberley Process system of self-regulation,


Expressing its appreciation to the Governments of South Africa, Namibia, Belgium, the Russian Federation, the United Kingdom, Angola, Botswana, Canada and Switzerland for hosting meetings of the Kimberley Process,


Noting with appreciation the important contribution made by industry and civil society to the development of the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme,


Further noting the decision made at the 5 November 2002 Interlaken meeting to launch the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme beginning on 1 January 2003,


Welcoming the progress achieved at the Interlaken meeting in developing the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme, including the adoption on 5 November 2002 of the Interlaken Declaration on the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme for Rough Diamonds,


“1.Strongly supports the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme, as well as the ongoing process to refine and implement the regime, adopted at the Interlaken Conference as a valuable contribution against trafficking in conflict diamonds and looks forward to its implementation and strongly encourages the participants to further resolve outstanding issues;


“2.Further welcomes the voluntary system of industry self-regulation, as described in the Interlaken Declaration; and


“3.Stresses that the widest possible participation in the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme is essential and should be encouraged and facilitated and urges all Member States to actively participate in the Scheme.”


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