23/12/2003
Press Release
GA/10224



Fifty-eighth General Assembly

Plenary

78th Meeting (PM)


GENERAL ASSEMBLY UNDERSCORES NEED FOR SUCCESSFUL CONCLUSION OF DOHA


DEVELOPMENT AGENDA AS IT ACTS ON SECOND COMMITTEE TEXTS


Taking up Reports from Committee’s Session,

Delegates Adopt 37 Draft Resolutions, 7 Draft Decisions


The General Assembly stressed the importance of redoubling efforts for the successful conclusion of the World Trade Organization (WTO) Doha development agenda by 1 January 2005, as it adopted one of 37 draft resolutions and seven draft decisions recommended by its Second Committee (Economic and Financial) this afternoon.


By other terms of that text on international trade and development, adopted without a vote, the Assembly called on the WTO to achieve the reduction or elimination of high tariffs, tariff peaks and tariff escalation, as well as non-tariff barriers on non-agricultural products.  It also called on the trade body to substantially improve market access; reduce, with a view to phasing out, all forms of export subsidies; substantially reduce trade-distorting domestic support in agriculture; and seek an effective solution to problems reflected in the cotton initiative proposed by a group of African countries.


By a draft resolution on commodities, also adopted without a vote, the Assembly stressed the importance of taking the needs of commodity-dependent countries into account in speedily resuming and concluding the Doha work programme.  It also stressed the importance of empowering developing-country commodity producers to insure themselves against risk, including natural disasters.  The Assembly further emphasized the need for such countries to promote a domestic policy and institutional environment that encouraged diversification and liberalization of the trade and export sectors.


Adopting a text on the international financial system and development, also without a vote, the Assembly stressed the importance of strong domestic institutions to promote business and financial stability so that growth and development could be achieved through sound macroeconomic policies and strong corporate, financial and banking regulatory systems.  Further, it emphasized that current efforts to reform the international financial architecture must include the effective participation of developing and transition countries.  It also underlined the importance of promoting international financial stability and sustainable growth, with a view to early identification of problems and risks; providing adequate precautionary support for external crises; and improving the transparency of macroeconomic data and statistical information on international capital flows.


By a draft resolution on globalization and interdependence, the Assembly stressed the need to address global asymmetries, including developing-country vulnerability to external shocks; the concentration of technical innovation in industrialized countries; the limited international mobility of labour; and such issues as increasing the flow of foreign direct investment and enhancing the participation of developing countries in the world trading and financial systems.


The Assembly underlined, by other terms of that text, the importance of improved developing-country access to international financial markets; counter-cyclical macroeconomic policies in the face of volatile capital flows; and strengthening macroeconomic stability.  It also stressed the need to build an inclusive global information society, and to support national efforts through international and regional cooperation among governments, the private sector, civil society and other stakeholders, including international financial institutions.


Adopting a text on the external debt crisis and development, the Assembly stressed the need for all creditors to vigorously and expeditiously pursue debt-relief measures, and for the speedy implementation of the enhanced Heavily Indebted Poor Countries Initiative, which should be fully financed through additional resources.  It also stressed the need to bring about a sustained commitment on the part of heavily indebted poor countries to improve domestic policies and economic management.


Also by that text, the Assembly recognized that creditors and debtors must share the responsibility for preventing unsustainable debt situations and that debt relief could play a key role in liberating resources that should be directed towards poverty eradication, sustainable economic growth and sustainable development.  It stressed that debt sustainability depended upon many factors at the international and national levels and emphasized the need to take country circumstances into account.


In its first recorded action, the Assembly adopted a draft urging the international community to eliminate unilateral coercive economic measures against developing countries that were not authorized by the United Nations, and which contravened the basic principles of the multilateral trading system.  That text was adopted by 125 votes in favour to 1 against (United States), with 37 abstentions (see Annex I).


Addressing the specific problems of women in development, the Assembly adopted a draft urging governments to create a non-discriminatory and gender-sensitive legal environment by removing discriminatory legislation as soon as possible.  It further urged them to eliminate discrimination against women in access to bank loans, mortgages and other forms of financial credit; to design and revise laws ensuring that women were accorded equal rights to own land and other property, including through inheritance; and to carry out reforms giving women the same right as men to credit, capital, appropriate technologies, and access to markets and information.


In addition, the Assembly adopted several drafts in the area of environment and sustainable development, including one text calling on Israel not to exploit, cause loss, deplete or endanger the natural resources in the occupied Palestinian and Syrian Golan territories.  Also by that text, the Assembly recognized the Palestinian right to claim restitution as a result of any exploitation, loss, depletion or danger to their natural resources.  It took that action by a recorded vote of 157 in favour to 4 against (Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, United States) with 10 abstentions (see Annex II).


Other environmental texts adopted by consensus today related to new and renewable energy sources; sustainable development in mountain regions; the International Year of Deserts and Desertification, 2004; natural disasters and vulnerability; the United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development; and the Convention on Biological Diversity.


In further unanimous action, the Assembly, recognizing the importance of the World Tourism Organization, and convinced that tourism could contribute significantly to sustainable development and poverty eradication, adopted a text transforming that intergovernmental body into a specialized agency of the United Nations.


The Assembly also adopted unanimously drafts relating to the International Conference on Financing for Development; the Almaty Programme of Action, addressing the special needs of landlocked developing countries; the Third United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries; international migration and development; public administration and development; and the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT).


Adopting several consensus drafts relating to upcoming international meetings, the Assembly decided, by one text, that the International Meeting to Review Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States would be held from 30 August to 3 September 2004, and welcomed the offer by the Government of Mauritius to host that Meeting.  It further endorsed the Economic and Social Council’s decision to convene an interregional preparatory meeting for small island developing States in Nassau, Bahamas, from 26 to 30 January 2004, and its decision to convene a preparatory meeting from 14 to 16 April 2004, during the twelfth session of the Commission on Sustainable Development.


In another consensus action, the Assembly adopted a text on the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, deciding to convene a World Conference on Disaster Reduction in 2005 at Kobe, Japan, from 18 to 22 January 2005.  It further decided to set up an open-ended intergovernmental preparatory committee for the Conference, which would meet in Geneva following the 2004 session of the Inter-Agency Task Force for Disaster Reduction.


Adopting another draft resolution, also without a vote, the Assembly proclaimed the period from 2005 to 2015 the International Decade for Action, “Water for Life”.  The Decade would begin on World Water Day, 22 March, 2005, aiming for a greater focus on water-related issues and further cooperation at all levels to achieve water-related goals of the Millennium Declaration, the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation of the World Summit for Sustainable Development and Agenda 21.


The Assembly also adopted draft resolutions on cybersecurity and the protection of critical information infrastructures; preventing and combating corrupt practices and transfer of funds and assets of illicit origin and their return to the countries of origin; human resources development; science and technology for development; the United Nations Institute for Training and Research; the United Nations System Staff College in Turin, Italy; economic and technical cooperation among developing countries; and the Programme of Action for the International Year of Microcredit, 2005.


In a final recorded action, by 167 votes in favour to 3 against (Israel, Marshall Islands, United States) with no abstentions, the Assembly adopted a draft decision approving the Committee’s provisional programme of work for 2004.


Acting on other draft decisions, the Assembly took note of the report of the Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) on the activities of the United Nations Development Fund for Women; and on the report of the Secretary-General of the International Telecommunication Union regarding preparations for the World Summit on the Information Society.


By further draft decisions, the Assembly also took note of the Report on the transit environment in the Landlocked States in Central Asia and their transit developing neighbours; the report of the Secretary-General on progress towards and challenges and constraints to the achievement of the major development goals and objectives adopted by the United Nations during the past decade; and documents relating to the Economic and Social Council.  In addition, it adopted a draft decision on science and technology for development.


Following its action on the Second Committee reports, the Assembly turned to outstanding plenary business, adopting draft resolutions on the implementation of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD); implementation of the Secretary-General’s report on the causes of conflict in Africa; follow-up to the outcome of its twenty-sixth special session:  implementation of the Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS; and 2001-2010:  Decade to Roll Back Malaria in Developing Countries, Particularly in Africa.


Also unanimously adopted was a text designating 7 April 2004 International Day of Reflection to commemorate the victims of Rwanda genocide.  Noting that many of the perpetrators continued to elude justice, the Assembly expressed its conviction that exposing and holding them and their accomplices accountable, as well as restoring the dignity of the victims, would guide societies in the prevention of further such violations.


The representative of South Africa introduced the texts on NEPAD, the Secretary-General’s report on durable peace in Africa, and the Decade to Roll Back Malaria.  The representative of Mozambique introduced the draft on the International Day of Reflection for the Rwanda Genocide.


Later today, the General Assembly will meet to take action on the reports of its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary).


Background


The General Assembly met this afternoon to consider the reports of its Second Committee (Economic and Financial).


Reports of Second Committee


The Committee’s report on “Macroeconomic policy questions” (document A/58/481 and Corr.1) is submitted in seven parts.


Part II of the report (document A/58/481/Add.1) contains two draft resolutions.  Draft I, on international trade and development, which the Committee approved without a vote on 16 December, would have the Assembly express concern over the setback to the Fifth Ministerial Conference of the World Trade Organization (WTO).  The Assembly would stress the importance of redoubling efforts for the successful, timely, and development-oriented conclusion of the Doha negotiations by 1 January 2005.


By other terms of that text, the Assembly would call on the WTO to reduce or eliminate high tariffs, tariff peaks and tariff escalation, as well as non-tariff barriers on non-agricultural products; substantially improve market access; reduce, with a view to phasing out, all forms of export subsidies; substantially reduce trade-distorting domestic support in agriculture; and expeditiously adopt appropriate modalities for reducing commitments in agriculture negotiations.  It would also call on the WTO to seek an effective solution to problems reflected in the cotton initiative proposed by a group of African countries.


The Assembly would, by further terms, call on the WTO to address the abusive application of anti-dumping, sanitary and phytosanitary standards and other trade-distorting measures; positively consider trade-related issues pertaining to commodities in the multilateral trading system; appropriate modalities for reducing or eliminating commitments on market access for non-agricultural products, particularly on products of export interest to developing countries; and make WTO operations more transparent, including through more effective and prompt dissemination of information.


Draft resolution II, on unilateral economic measures as a means of political and economic coercion against developing countries, was approved on 9 December by a recorded vote of 105 in favour to 2 against (Georgia, United States) with 43 abstentions.  By that text, the Assembly would urge the international community to eliminate unilateral coercive economic measures against developing countries that are not authorized by the United Nations and which contravene the basic principles of the multilateral trading system.


Part III (document A/58/481/Add.2) contains two draft resolutions and two draft decisions.


By the terms of draft resolution I, on cybersecurity and the protection of critical information infrastructures, which the Committee approved without a vote on 11 December, the Assembly would invite Member States to consider elements annexed to the text on protecting critical information infrastructures in developing a strategy for reducing risks to such infrastructures.  Further, it would stress the need for enhanced efforts to close the digital divide to achieve universal access to information and communication technology, and to protect critical information infrastructures by facilitating the transfer of information technology and capacity-building, especially to the least developed countries.


Draft resolution II, on science and technology for development, approved without a vote on 11 December, would have the Assembly urge United Nations bodies to cooperate in ensuring that countries receive sound scientific information and practical advice to enable them to take advantage of those technologies.  By other terms, it would request the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) to update the publication Information and Communication Technology Development Indices.  Further, it would call on the Secretary-General to ensure that the Commission on Science and Technology for Development has the necessary resources to carry out its mandate.


By terms of draft decision I on science and technology for development, approved without a vote on 9 December, the Assembly would take note of the Secretary-General’s report on the impact of new biotechnologies on sustainable development, including food security, health and economic productivity and request that it be circulated at the 2004 Global Biotechnology Forum, to be held in Chile.


Draft decision II, approved without a vote on 11 December, would have the Assembly take note of a note by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Secretary-General of the International Telecommunication Union on the ongoing preparatory process for the World Summit on the Information Society.


Part IV of the report (document A/58 /481/Add.3) contains one draft resolution and one draft decision.  By the draft resolution on the Almaty Programme of Action:  Addressing the Special Needs of Landlocked Developing Countries with a New Global Framework for Transit Transport Cooperation for Landlocked and Transit Developing Countries, approved without a vote on 11 December, the Assembly would endorse the Almaty Programme of Action and call for its full and effective implementation.  Also, it would request that the Secretary-General submit, during the Assembly’s fifty-ninth session, a report on the progress made in the Programme’s implementation.


The draft decision would have the Assembly take note of the Report on the transit environment in the Landlocked States in Central Asia and their transit developing neighbours prepared by the Secretary-General of UNCTAD.


Part V of the report (document A/58/481/Add.4) contains a draft resolution on the international financial system and development, which the Committee approved without a vote on 16 December.  By that text, the Assembly would recognize with concern that developing countries made net outward transfers of financial resources in 2002 for the sixth consecutive year, while underscoring the need for national and international measures to address this issue.  It would also stress the importance of strong domestic institutions to promote business activities and financial stability to achieve growth and development through sound macroeconomic policies and strong corporate, financial and banking regulatory systems.


Also by that text, the Assembly would underline the importance of promoting international financial stability and sustainable growth with a view to the early identification of problems and risks; of providing adequate precautionary support for external crises; and of further improving the transparency of macroeconomic data and statistical information on international capital flows.  Further, the Assembly would emphasize that current efforts to reform the international financial architecture must include the effective participation of developing and transition countries.  By other terms, it would emphasize the need to ensure the effective participation of developing countries in the formulation of financial standards and codes.


Part VI of the report (document A/58/481/Add.5) contains a draft resolution on the external debt crisis and development, approved without a vote on 16 December.  By that text, the Assembly would emphasize that the international financial system, enhanced official and private external financing, official development assistance and foreign direct investment are key elements for a durable solution to external debt problems in developing countries.  It would also stress that sustainable debt financing is an important element in mobilizing resources for public and private investment, and that comprehensive national strategies to monitor and manage external liabilities embedded in domestic preconditions for debt sustainability are key to reducing national vulnerabilities.


The Assembly would, by other terms, stress the need for all creditors to vigorously and expeditiously pursue debt-relief measures.  It would also stress the need to speedily and fully implement the enhanced Heavily Indebted Poor Countries Initiative, which should be fully financed through additional resources, while stressing the need for fair, equitable and transparent burden-sharing among the international public creditor community and other donor countries.


Further, the Assembly would stress the need to bring about a sustained commitment on the part of heavily indebted poor countries to improvements in domestic policies and economic management; reduce the unsustainable debt burden of developing countries through such actions as debt relief, debt cancellation and other innovative mechanisms geared to comprehensively addressing the debt problems of developing countries; to establish effective debt-tracking mechanisms in developing countries and strengthen technical assistance for external debt management and debt tracking.


Part VII of the report (document A/58/481/Add.6) contains one draft resolution on commodities, which the Committee approved without a vote on 12 December.  That draft would have the General Assembly stress the importance of speedily resuming and concluding the work programme adopted at the 2001 WTO meeting at Doha, taking into account the needs of commodity-dependent developing countries.  By other terms, it would emphasize the need for developing countries that are heavily dependent on primary commodities to promote a domestic policy and institutional environment that encourage diversification and liberalization of the trade and export sectors, as well as enhanced competition.


Further by that text, the Assembly would urge governments, and invite international financial institutions, to continue assessing the effectiveness of systems for compensatory financing of shortfalls in export-earnings, and stress the importance of empowering developing-country commodity producers to insure themselves against risk, including natural disasters.  Also by that text, it would call on UNCTAD, and invite other relevant United Nations bodies to strengthen their capacity-building and technical cooperation activities in policy design and implementation, institution-building, management and use of commodity revenues, price risk management and improving supply capacities, and enhance activities aimed at South-South cooperation in commodities.


Sectoral Policy Questions


The Committee’s report on “Sectoral policy questions” (document A/58/482) contains a draft resolution on preventing and combating corrupt practices and transfer of funds and assets of illicit origin and returning such funds and assets to the countries of origin, which was approved without a vote on 11 December.  By that text, the Assembly would encourage States to require financial institutions to implement comprehensive due diligence and vigilance programmes to facilitate transparency and prevent the placement of illicit funds.


By other terms, the Assembly would call for further international cooperation in support of national, subregional and regional efforts to prevent and address the transfer of assets of illicit origin, and to return them to the countries of origin.  Further, it would request the international community to provide technical assistance supporting national efforts to strengthen human and institutional capacity aimed at preventing corrupt practices and the transfer of assets of illicit origin, returning them to the countries of origin and formulating strategies for mainstreaming and promoting transparency and integrity in both the public and private sectors.


Sustainable Development and international economic cooperation


The Committee’s report on “Sustainable development and international economic cooperation” (document A/58/483) is submitted in five parts.


Part I (document A/58/483/Add.1) contains a draft resolution on women in development, which the Committee approved without a vote on 11 December.  By its terms, the Assembly would urge governments to create a non-discriminatory and gender-sensitive legal environment by striving to remove discriminatory legislation as soon as possible.  By other terms, it would urge governments to eliminate discrimination against women in respect of access to bank loans, mortgages and other forms of financial credit, and support their access to legal assistance.


Further by that text, the Assembly would urge States to design and revise laws, ensuring that women are accorded equal rights to own land and other property, including through inheritance, and carry out reforms giving women the same right as men to credit, capital, appropriate technologies, and access to markets and information.  Further, it would urge all governments to ensure women’s equal rights with men and their full and equal access to education, training, employment, technology and economic and financial resources, including credit, particularly for rural women and women in the informal sector.


Part II of the report (document A/58/483/Add.2) contains a draft resolution on human resources development, which the Committee approved without a vote on 11 December.  By that text, the Assembly would urge all countries, the United Nations, international organizations, the private sector, non-governmental organizations, and civil society to increase investment in all aspects of human development, such as health, nutrition, education, training and capacity-building.


By other terms, the Assembly would urge the adoption of cross-sectoral approaches to human-resources development, combining, among other factors, economic growth, poverty eradication, provision of basic social services, sustainable livelihoods, empowerment of women, involvement of young people, the needs of vulnerable groups in society, the needs of local indigenous communities, and political freedom.  It would also emphasize the need to ensure the full participation of women in formulating and implementing national and local policies to promote human resources development.


Part III of the report (document A/58/483/Add.3) contains one draft resolution on international migration and development, which was approved without a vote on 12 December.  By its terms, the Assembly would urge States, as well as the United Nations, to continue strengthening international cooperation and arrangements at all levels in international migration and development to maximize its benefits for migrants.  It would also call on United Nations bodies and other intergovernmental, regional and subregional organizations to work towards integrating migration issues more coherently within the broader context of implementing agreed economic and social development goals.  The Assembly would decide, by further terms, that the high-level dialogue of the General Assembly in 2006 will be devoted to international migration and development.


Part IV of the report (document A/58/483/Add.4) contains a draft decision on the report of the Secretary-General on progress towards and challenges and constraints to the achievement of the major development goals and objectives adopted by the United Nations during the past decade, which the Committee approved without a vote on 12 December.  It would have the Assembly take note of that report.


Environment and Sustainable Development


The Committee’s report on “Environment and sustainable development” (document A/58/484) is submitted in nine parts.


Part I (document A/58/484/Add.1) contains a draft resolution on the promotion of new and renewable sources of energy, including the implementation of the World Solar Programme 1996-2005, which the Committee approved without a vote on 11 December.  By that draft, the Assembly would emphasize the need to intensify research and development to support energy for sustainable development, which will require increased commitment from all stakeholders to deploy financial and human resources for research efforts.  By other terms, it would stress that the wider use of available renewable sources of energy requires technology transfer and diffusion on a global scale.


Part II of the report (document A/58/484/Add.2) contains two draft resolutions.  Draft resolution I is on implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa, which the Committee approved on 11 December by a recorded vote on operative paragraph 14 of 153 in favour to 1 against (United States), with no abstentions.  By that text, the Assembly would urge the international community to take effective measures to implement the Convention through bilateral and multilateral cooperation programmes.


By other terms, the Assembly would urge United Nations bodies, the Bretton Woods institutions, donor countries and development agencies to integrate actions to support the Convention in their strategies to support the achievement of internationally agreed development goals.  Also, it would call on governments, and invite multilateral financial institutions, regional development banks, regional economic integration organizations and other interested organizations, non-governmental organizations and the private sector, to contribute generously to the General Fund, the Supplementary Fund and the Special Fund.


Draft resolution II, on the International Year of Deserts and Desertification, 2004, which the Committee approved without a vote on 11 December, would have the Assembly decide to declare 2006 the International Year of Deserts and Desertification.  Further, it would designate the Executive Secretary of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa, as focal point of the Year, in conjunction with UNEP, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and other relevant United Nations bodies.


Part III of the report (document A/58/484/Add.3) contains a draft resolution on the Convention on Biological Diversity, which was approved without a vote on 16 December.  That text would have the Assembly emphasize that effective implementation of the Convention’s Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety would require full support from parties and relevant international organizations, and urge parties to facilitate biosafety capacity-building in developing and transition countries, including developing and strengthening national capacities for making the required information available to the Biosafety Clearing House.


The Assembly would, by other terms, encourage developed countries to contribute to the relevant trust funds of the Convention.  Also by the text, it would urge States parties to facilitate the technology transfer for effectively implementing the Convention.  Further, it would underline the need of developing and transition countries for increased financial and technical resources for implementing the Convention and Protocol, and welcome the successful and substantial third replenishment of the Global Environment Facility (GEF).


Part IV of the report (document A/58/484/Add.4) contains a draft resolution on further implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States, which was approved without a vote on 16 December.  By that text, the Assembly would decide that the International Meeting to Review Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States will be held from 30 August to 3 September 2004.  It would also welcome the offer by the Government of Mauritius to host the Meeting, and include a high-level segment to fully review implementation of the Programme of Action.


The Assembly would decide, by other terms, that the Meeting will seek renewed international political commitment, and focus on practical actions to further implement the Programme of Action.  It would also endorse the Economic and Social Council’s decision to convene an interregional preparatory meeting for small island developing States in Nassau, Bahamas, from 26 to 30 January 2004, as well as its decision to convene a preparatory meeting for the International Meeting from 14 to 16 April 2004, during the twelfth session of the Commission on Sustainable Development.


Part V of the report (document A/58/484/Add.5) contains two draft resolutions.  Draft resolution I, on the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, which the Committee approved without a vote on 11 December, would have the Assembly decide to convene a World Conference on Disaster Reduction in 2005.  The Conference will aim to conclude the review of the Yokohama Strategy and its Plan of Action; identify specific activities aimed at ensuring implementation of the Plan of Implementation of the World Summit on Sustainable Development on vulnerability, risk assessment and disaster management; share best practices and lessons learned to further disaster reduction and identify gaps and challenges; increase awareness of the importance of disaster reduction policies; and increase the reliability and availability of appropriate disaster-related information to the public and disaster management agencies.


By other terms, the Assembly would accept the offer of the Government of Japan to host the Conference, and decide that the Conference will be held at Kobe, Japan, from 18 to 22 January 2005.  Further, it would decide to establish an open-ended intergovernmental preparatory committee for the Conference, which will meet in Geneva following the 2004 session of the Inter-Agency Task Force for Disaster Reduction for up to two days each time, and for one day at Kobe during the Conference.  Also by the text, the Assembly would decide that additional costs of the preparatory process and the Conference should be funded through extrabudgetary resources and through specific voluntary contributions to the Trust Fund for the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction.


By draft resolution II, on natural disasters and vulnerability, which the Committee approved without a vote on 11 December, the Assembly would urge the international community to address ways of reducing the adverse effects of natural disasters, particularly in vulnerable countries, by implementing the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction.  It would also encourage the Inter-Agency Task Force for Disaster Reduction to enhance coordination on promoting disaster reduction and make available to relevant United Nations bodies information on options for reducing natural disasters, including severe natural hazards and vulnerabilities and extreme weather-related disasters and vulnerabilities.


Part VI of the report (document A/58/484/Add.6) contains a draft resolution on protection of global climate for present and future generations of mankind, approved on 11 December by a recorded vote of 153 in favour to 1 against (United States), with no abstentions.  According to that text, the Assembly would call on States to work cooperatively in achieving the ultimate objective of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.  Also, the Assembly would encourage cooperation among the liaison group of secretariats and officers of relevant subsidiary bodies of the Framework Convention, the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa, and the Convention on Biological Diversity.


Part VII of the report (document A/58/484/Add.7) contains a draft resolution on sustainable development in mountain regions, approved without a vote on

11 December.  According to that text, the Assembly would underline that key challenges remain in implementing sustainable development and eradicating poverty in mountain regions, as well as challenges in national involvement, international cooperation, support for partnerships, and mobilization of financial resources.


Against that background, the Assembly would support national efforts to develop goals, strategic plans, policies and laws for sustainable mountain development; encourage transboundary approaches to sustainable development of mountain ranges; and support the development and implementation of global, regional and national communication programmes to build upon the awareness and momentum for change established by the International Year of Mountains.  Further, it would call for the improvement of access by mountain women to resources and the strengthening of their role in their communities and cultures.


Part VIII of the report (document A/58/484/Add.8) contains a draft resolution on the Report of the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme on its twenty-second session, which was approved without a vote on 9 December.  By that draft, the Assembly would emphasize the need for UNEP to further contribute to sustainable development programmes, the implementation of Agenda 21 and the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation.  It would also call on UNEP to contribute to preparations for next year’s international meeting in Mauritius to review implementation of the Barbados Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States.


By other terms, the Assembly would reiterate the need for stable, adequate and predictable financial resources for UNEP, and underline the need to consider the adequate reflection of all administrative and management costs in the context of the United Nations regular budget.


Implementation of Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development


The Committee’s report on “Implementation of Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development” (document A/58/485) contains two draft resolutions.


Draft resolution I, on the International Decade for Action, “Water for Life”, 2005-2015, was approved without a vote on 9 December.  By its terms, the Assembly would proclaim the period from 2005 to 2015 as the International Decade for Action, “Water for Life”, beginning on World Water Day, 22 March 2005.  Further, it would decide that the Decade’s goal would be a greater focus on water-related issues, while striving to ensure the participation of women in water-related development efforts, and further cooperation at all levels to achieve water-related goals of the Millennium Declaration, the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation and Agenda 21.


Further by that draft, the Assembly would invite the Commission on Sustainable Development to identify possible activities related to the Decade within the framework of its consideration of the thematic cluster of issues on water, sanitation and human settlements at its twelfth and thirteenth sessions.


Draft resolution II, on implementation of Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcome of the World Summit on Sustainable Development, was approved without a vote on 11 December.  By its terms, the Assembly would call on governments, United Nations bodies, regional economic commissions and specialized agencies; international financial institutions, the GEF, other intergovernmental organizations, and major groups to ensure the effective implementation of and follow-up to the commitments, programmes and time-bound targets adopted at the World Summit.


United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development


The Committee’s report (document A/58/486) contains a draft resolution on the United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development, which the Committee approved without a vote on 11 December.  The draft would have the Assembly reaffirm that education for sustainable development is critical for promoting sustainable development, and encourage governments to consider including measures to implement the Decade in their education strategies and national development plans by 2005.


Operational Activities for Development


The Committee’s report on “Operational activities for development” (document A/58/487) contains a draft resolution on economic and technical cooperation among developing countries, which was approved on 11 December without a vote.  By its terms, the Assembly would call on United Nations bodies to intensify efforts to mainstream technical and economic cooperation among developing countries by using relevant national, regional and international mechanisms in consultation with Member States.  By other terms, it would urge developing countries and their development partners to intensify South-South and triangular cooperation in the economic, social and development fields.


Further by that draft, the Assembly would urge United Nations bodies and multilateral institutions to intensify their efforts to mainstream South-South cooperation into the design, formulation and implementation of their regular programmes, and increase human, technical and financial resources to South-South cooperation initiatives.  Also, it would declare 19 December United Nations Day for South-South Cooperation and designate the Special Unit for South-South Cooperation as the coordinator for that Day, as well as for the International Decade on South-South Cooperation, beginning in 2005 and ending in 2015.


Implementation of the First United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (1997-2006)


The Committee’s report on “Implementation of the first United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (1997-2006)” (document A/58/488) contains two draft resolutions.


By the terms of draft resolution I, on Programme of Action for the International Year of Microcredit, 2005, which the Committee approved without a vote on 11 December, the Assembly would emphasize that observance of the year 2005 as the International Year of Microcredit would provide a significant opportunity to raise awareness of the importance of microcredit and microfinance in eradicating poverty.  It would also provide opportunities to share good practices and further enhance programmes supporting sustainable pro-poor financial sectors in all countries.


The Assembly would, by other terms, invite the Department of Economic and Social Affairs and the United Nations Capital Development Fund to jointly coordinate activities to prepare and observe the Year.  It would also invite States, United Nations bodies, non-governmental organizations, the private sector and civil society to collaborate in preparing and observing the Year, and to raise public awareness and knowledge about microcredit and microfinance.


Draft resolution II, on implementation of the First United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (1997-2006), was approved without a vote on 11 December.  By that text, the Assembly would stress the importance of following up on the outcome of the International Conference on Financing for Development, and call for implementation of the Monterrey Consensus.  It would further urge developed countries to make concrete efforts to reach the targets of 0.7 per cent of their gross national product as official development assistance to developing countries, and 0.15 to 0.2 per cent of their gross national product to least developed countries.  Also by that text, it would urge countries to direct resources freed through debt relief towards activities consistent with attaining poverty eradication, sustainable economic growth, sustainable development and achieving internationally agreed development goals.


By other terms, the Assembly would emphasize the link between poverty eradication and improving access to safe drinking water, and stress the objective of halving, by 2015, the proportion of people unable to reach or afford safe drinking water and the proportion of those without access to basic sanitation.  Further, it would stress the importance of meeting the special needs of Africa, where poverty remains a major challenge and where most countries have not benefited fully from globalization.


Training and Research


The Committee’s report on “Training and research” (document A/58/489) contains two draft resolutions.


By draft resolution I on the United Nations Institute for Training and Research, which the Committee approved without a vote on 11 December, the Assembly would stress that the Institute focus primarily on development issues and the management of international affairs.  By other terms, it would urge States that have interrupted their voluntary contributions to consider resuming them, in view of the successful restructuring and revitalization of the Institute.


The Assembly would, by further terms, encourage the Board of Trustees to resolve the Institute’s critical financial situation, particularly with a view to broadening its donor base and increasing contributions to the General Fund.  Also, the Assembly would stress the need to speedily resolve issues related to the Institute’s rent, debt, and rental rates and maintenance costs, taking into account its financial situation.


Draft resolution II, on the United Nations System Staff College in Turin, Italy, which the Committee approved without a vote on 9 December, would have the Assembly encourage the College to provide strategic leadership to increase operational effectiveness, promote inter-agency collaboration and strengthen management culture by its own example.  Further, it would call on relevant United Nations bodies, including the United Nations University, the United Nations Institute for Training and Research and the Staff College, to collaborate to those ends.


Globalization and Interdependence


The Committee’s report on “Globalization and interdependence” (document A/58/490) contains a draft resolution on the role of the United Nations in promoting development in the context of globalization and interdependence, which was approved without a vote on 12 December.  By its terms, the Assembly would stress the need to address global asymmetries, including developing-country vulnerability to external shocks; the concentration of technical innovation in industrialized countries; the limited international mobility of labour; and such issues as increasing the flow of foreign direct investment and enhancing the participation of developing countries in the world trading and financial systems.


By other terms, the Assembly would underline the importance of improved developing-country access to international financial markets; counter-cyclical macroeconomic policies in the face of volatile capital flows; and strengthening macroeconomic stability.  It would also stress the need to build an inclusive global information society, and to support national efforts by effective international and regional cooperation among governments, the private sector, civil society and other stakeholders, including international financial institutions.


Also by that text, the Assembly would emphasize the importance of recognizing and addressing the specific concerns of transition countries to help them benefit from globalization, with a view to their full integration into the world economy.  Further, it would stress the importance of migration as a phenomenon accompanying increased globalization, and underline the need for greater coordination and cooperation among countries, as well as relevant regional and international organizations.


Implementation of the Outcome of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and the Strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT)


The Committee’s report (document A/58/491) contains two draft resolutions.


Draft resolution I, on implementation of the outcome of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and the strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT), was approved without a vote on 16 December.  By that text, the Assembly would urge governments to promote pro-poor investments in services and infrastructure, particularly water and sanitation, to improve living environments, especially in slums and informal settlements.  It would also request UN-HABITAT to strengthen its efforts to make the Cities Alliance initiative an effective means for implementing the Habitat Agenda’s twin goals -– namely, adequate shelter for all and sustainable human settlements development in an urbanizing world.


Also by that draft, the Assembly would call for continued financial support to UN-HABITAT through increased voluntary contributions to the Habitat and Human Settlements Foundation.  It would also invite the Secretary-General to incorporate the assessment of progress towards the target of achieving a significant improvement in the lives of at least 100 million slum-dwellers by 2020 in his report for the 2005 review of the implementation of the United Nations Millennium Declaration.


Draft resolution II, on the rules of procedure of the Governing Council of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT), approved without a vote on 9 December, would have the Assembly adopt the rules of procedure of the Governing Council of UN-HABITAT, as annexed to Governing Council resolution 19/1 of 9 May 2003.


Third United Nations Conference on Least Developed Countries


The Committee’s report (document A/58/492) contains a text on the Third United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries, which was approved without a vote on 11 December.  It would have the Assembly call on the development partners of least developed countries (LDCs), including multilateral financial institutions, to speedily implement the Conference’s Programme of Action, and urge developed countries to make concrete efforts to implement their commitments on official development assistance for LDCs.  The draft would also have the Assembly urge LDCs and their development partners to make the Programme an effective tool for implementing national poverty-reduction strategies.


Permanent Sovereignty of the Palestinian People in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab Population in the Occupied Syrian Golan over Their Natural Resources


The Committee’s report (document A/58/493) contains a draft resolution on permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the occupied Palestinian territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab Population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources, which the Committee approved on 9 December by a recorded action of 142 votes in favour, to 4 against (Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, United States) with 9 abstentions (Australia, Cameroon, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Nauru, Nicaragua, Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Tuvalu).


By that text, the Assembly would call on Israel not to exploit, cause loss, deplete or endanger the natural resources in the occupied Palestinian and Syrian Golan territories.  Further, it would recognize the Palestinian right to claim restitution as a result of any exploitation, loss, depletion or danger to their natural resources, and express the hope that the issue will be dealt with in final status negotiations between the Palestinian and Israeli sides.


Follow-up to the International Conference on Financing for Development


The Committee’s report (document A/58/494) contains a draft resolution on follow-up to and implementation of the outcome of the International Conference on Financing for Development, which the Committee approved without a vote on 16 December.  By its terms, the Assembly would emphasize the link between financing for development and achievement of the internationally agreed development goals.  It would stress the importance of fully implementing the commitment to enhance further the coherence and consistency of international monetary, financial and trading systems.


Also by that text, the Assembly would invite the WTO to strengthen its institutional relationship with the United Nations, particularly through its active involvement in meetings of the General Assembly and the Economic and Social Council.  Also by the text, it would invite countries to report by 2005 on their efforts to implement the Monterrey Consensus.


Report of the Economic and Social Council


The Committee’s report (document A/58/495) contains two draft resolutions and two draft decisions.


Draft resolution I, on public administration and development, approved without a vote on 11 December, would have the Assembly welcome the offer of the Government of the Republic of Korea to host the sixth Global Forum on Reinventing Government in Seoul in 2005.  By other terms, it would stress the need to strengthen national public sector administrative and managerial capacity-building, particularly in developing and transition countries.  Also by the text, it would request the Secretary-General to support information exchange and research, and to distribute successful practices and advisory services in public administration that contribute to achieving internationally agreed development goals.


By draft resolution II, on the agreement between the United Nations and the World Tourism Organization, which the Committee approved without a vote on 7 November, the Assembly would approve a draft agreement to transform the World Tourism Organization, an intergovernmental body, into a specialized agency of the United Nations.


Draft decision I, on Documents relating to the report of the Economic and Social Council, was approved without a vote on 12 December, and would have the Assembly take note of that report as well as the report of the Executive Director of the United Nations Population Fund on the United Nations Population Award.


Draft decision II, on the provisional programme of work of the Second Committee for 2004, was approved on 16 December by a recorded vote of 146 in favour to 3 against (Israel, Marshall Islands, United States), with 1 abstention (Nauru).


Draft Decisions before the Assembly


A draft decision on the report of the Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme on the activities of the United Nations Development Fund for Women (document A/58/168), would have the Assembly take note of that report.


Action on Second Committee Reports


JOSE ALBERTO BRIZ GUTIERREZ (Guatemala), Rapporteur of the Second Committee, introduced the Committee’s reports.


Taking up the report on macroeconomic policy questions:  international trade and development (document A/58/481 and Corr.1, Add. 1-6), the Assembly adopted a text on international trade and development without a vote.


It then adopted, by a recorded vote of 125 in favour, to 1 against (United States) with 37 abstentions, a draft resolution on unilateral economic measures as a means of political and economic coercion against developing countries.


Acting without a vote, it then adopted two draft resolutions on cybersecurity and the protection of critical information infrastructures; and science and technology for development contained in the report on science and technology for development (document A/58/481/Add.1).


Again without a vote, the Assembly adopted two draft decisions on science and technology for development, taking note of the Secretary-General’s note transmitting the report of the Secretary-General of the International Telecommunications Union on the ongoing preparatory process for the World Summit on the Information Society.


Prior to that action, the representative of the United States said that in taking note of reports of the Secretary-General, the Assembly was acting consistently with its resolution 55/488 of 7 September 2001.


The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, the draft resolution on the Almaty Programme of Action:  Addressing the Special Needs of Landlocked Developing Countries with a New Global Framework for Transit Transport Cooperation for Landlocked and Transit Developing Countries; and the draft decision taking note of the Report on the transit environment in the Landlocked States in Central Asia and their transit developing neighbours by the Secertary-General of the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD).


Acting again without a vote, the Assembly adopted three draft resolutions, relating respectively to the international financial system and development; the external debt crisis and development; and commodities.


Taking up the Committee’s report on sectoral policy questions (document A/58/482), the Assembly then adopted, without a vote, the draft resolution on preventing and combating corrupt practices and transfer of funds and assets of illicit origin and returning such funds and assets to the countries of origin.


Turning to the Committee’s report on sustainable development and international economic cooperation (document A/58/483), it then adopted, also without a vote, draft resolutions on women in development; human resources development; and international migration and development.  It then adopted a draft decision taking note of the Secretary-General’s report on progress towards and challenges and constraints to the achievement of the major development goals and objectives adopted by the United Nations during the past decade.


Next, the Assembly took up the Committee’s report on Environment and Sustainable Development (document A/58/484), adopting, without a vote, draft resolutions on the Report of the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) on its twenty-second session; and the promotion of new and renewable sources of energy, including the implementation of the World Solar Programme 1996-2005.


Following its subsequent adoption of the text on the International Year of Deserts and Desertification, 2004, the representative of the United States expressed disappointment at the continued divergence of resources from the regular United Nations budget to supplement the work of self-sustaining treaty bodies.  Such bodies should generate funds from among the States parties to the relevant treaties.


Next, the Assembly adopted draft resolutions on the Convention on Biological Diversity; further implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States; the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction; natural disasters and vulnerability; and sustainable development in mountain regions.


The Assembly then turned to the Committee’s report on implementation of Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development (document A/58/485).  It adopted draft resolutions on the International Decade for Action, “Water for Life”, 2005-2015; and implementation of Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcome of the World Summit on Sustainable Development.


Taking up the Committee’s report on the United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (document A/58/486), the Assembly then adopted the related text without a vote.


It then turned to the report on operational activities for development (document A/58/487), adopting the draft on economic and technical cooperation among developing countries, again without a vote.  Similarly, it adopted without a vote a draft decision to take note of the report of the Administrator of the United Nations Development Fund for Women.


Turning to the Committee’s report on implementation of the First United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (1997-2006) contained in document A/58/488, the Assembly then adopted, without a vote, the two texts relating to the Programme of Action for the International Year of Microcredit, 2005; and implementation of the First United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (1997-2006).


Before the Assembly took up the report on training and research (document A/58/489), the representative of Spain expressed support for the content of the draft on the United Nations Institute for Training and Research, but noted that he understood its operative paragraph four, on expanding alliances with other relevant agencies, to refer to alliances between the Institute and other United Nations organs and bodies, not non-State entities.


The Assembly then adopted, without a vote, the draft resolutions on the United Nations Institute for Training and Research, and on the United Nations System Staff College in Turin, Italy.


Taking up the Committee’s report on globalization and interdependence (document A/58/490), it then adopted, also without a vote, a text on the role of the United Nations in promoting development in the context of globalization and interdependence.


The Assembly then took up the Committee’s report on Implementation of the Outcome of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and of the twenty-fifth special session of the General Assembly (document A/58/491).  It adopted the two related texts, on implementation of the outcome of the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and the strengthening of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT); and on rules of procedure of the Governing Council of UN-HABITAT.


Next, the Assembly turned to the Committee’s report on the Third United Nations Conference on Least Developed Countries (document A/58/492), adopting the related text without a vote.


Prior to the Assembly’s next action, on the report on the Permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people and the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources (document A/58/493), the representative of Israel said that the related text had nothing to do with issues addressed by the Second Committee and shifted its focus from those activities identified by Member States as priorities.  Adoption of the text would only invite further politicization of the Committee’s work.  The text contributed nothing to the achievement of a lasting peace between the Israelis and Palestinians as it prejudged issues that the two sides agreed would be addressed through direct bilateral negotiations, thus undermining the bilateral spirit of the peace process.  Israel would vote against the biased and counterproductive draft text.


The Assembly then adopted the draft resolution by a recorded vote of 157 in favour to 4 against (Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, United States) and 10 abstentions. 


Turning to the Committee’s report on follow-up to the International Conference on Financing for Development (document A/58/494), it then adopted, without a vote, a draft resolution on follow-up to and implementation of the outcome of that Conference.


Again without a vote, the Assembly took action on three texts contained in the report on the Report of the Economic and Social Council (document A/58/495).  It adopted a draft resolution on public administration and development; a draft resolution on the agreement between the United Nations and the World Tourism Organization; and a draft decision on the report of the Economic and Social Council.


In a further action on that report, it adopted a draft decision approving the Committee’s programme of work for 2004 by a recorded vote of 167 in favour to 3 against (Israel, Marshall Islands, United States) and no abstentions.


Other Action


After taking action on the reports of the Second Committee, the Assembly turned to outstanding plenary business, including several draft resolutions for its consideration.


Before the Assembly was a text on the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD):  progress in implementation and international support (document A/58/L.17/Rev.1), which notes that much remains to be done to achieve the objectives and priorities of NEPAD and calls on Member States to enhance their support for the plan.  By that text, the Assembly would encourage African States to take further steps to deepen the process of integrating NEPAD’s priorities into their national development frameworks, to mobilize public and political support and develop sound programmes in the plan’s designated priority areas, as well as allocate adequate funding.


In a statement on the budget implications of the text, pertaining to the creation of the Office of the Special Adviser on Africa, the Secretariat noted that provisions for the activities of that mandate had already been included in the 2004-2005 budget.  Adopting the resolution would not require the appropriation of additional funds.


The Assembly then adopted the text without a vote.


Also before the Assembly were two related draft resolutions on causes of conflict and the promotion of durable peace and sustainable development in Africa.


By the first text, on an International Day of Reflection on the

1994 Genocide in Rwanda (document A/58/L.55), the Assembly would designate 7 April 2004 –- the tenth anniversary of those tragic events -- as the International Day of Reflection to commemorate the victims of the genocide, and recommit to fight against genocide throughout the world.  The Assembly would note with concern that many perpetrators of the genocide continue to elude justice, and would therefore express its conviction that exposing and holding the perpetrators and their accomplices accountable, as well as restoring the dignity of the victims, would guide societies in the prevention of further violations.


The Assembly adopted the text without a vote.


According to a draft on implementation of the recommendations contained in the report of the Secretary-General on the causes of conflict and the promotion of durable peace and sustainable development in Africa (document A/58/L.56), the Assembly would note that the prevention of conflict must remain the fundamental focus of the work of the United Nations and that peace, security and development, particularly in post-conflict contexts, are inextricably linked.


The Assembly would decide to continue to monitor the implementation of the recommendations contained in the report and would call upon Member States to provide coordinated and sustained financial and technical assistance to support activities to eradicate poverty, promote respect for human rights, strengthen the rule of law and promote transparent and accountable public administration.


The draft was adopted without a vote.


Following that action, the representative of Canada said her delegation had co-sponsored the text on the Rwanda genocide.  Unfortunately, since those horrific events in 1994, the international community had continued to witness actions that mocked the credo “never again”.  Commemorating the Rwanda genocide would not only recognize the failures of the past, but also point towards the actions needed to avoid such practices in the future.  In order for the United Nations to remain relevant, it must be vigilant and not be swayed by some Member States who insisted on a narrow interpretation of sovereignty, which focused only on privileges and not responsibilities.  The international community had a responsibility to halt such atrocities when the State in question lacked the means to do so.


The Assembly also had before it a draft resolution on follow-up to the outcome of its twenty-sixth special session:  implementation of the Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS (document A/58/L.54), by which the Assembly would note with profound concern that 42 million people worldwide are living with HIV/AIDS and that the pandemic claimed 3.1 million lives last year and has to date orphaned 14 million children.  The Assembly would reaffirm the Declaration’s goals and urge Member States to intensify national efforts and international cooperation in the implementation of the Declaration.


Also, the Assembly would urge intensified efforts to combat the AIDS emergency, including by providing stronger and more visible leadership in the response to the pandemic and creating an environment that encourages the engagement of, and partnerships with everyone, including civil society, people living with the disease, marginalized and vulnerable groups, cultural and faith-based organizations, traditional health practitioners, the private sector, media and others.


Prior to the Assembly’s action, the representative of Singapore said that, in line with the Secretary-General’s call for enhanced support for the Global Fund for AIDS, Malaria and Tuberculosis, the Government of Singapore would contribute $1 million to that end over the next five years.  The pandemic was a serious global problem and it was only right that the international community continue to pay close attention and redouble its efforts to address the mounting crisis.


The resolution was adopted without a vote.


Speaking in explanation of position after the vote, the representative of Brazil said his delegation remained concerned that language in the text stressing a focus on prevention measures fell short of the Declaration’s goal.  For any real hope of success in the global fight against HIV/AIDS, the international community must acknowledge that prevention, care, support and treatment were mutually reinforcing elements of an effective response.  Those principles must be integrated in a comprehensive approach.


While prevention referred to measures aimed at protecting non-infected persons, he said, infected persons also needed care, support and treatment.  “We must not abandon 42 million people worldwide living with HIV/AIDS.”  Brazil reaffirmed the importance of eliminating all forms of discrimination against people living with or at risk of HIV/AIDS, and no ground of discrimination, including sexual orientation, was legitimate to hinder the full enjoyment of human rights.


Assembly President Julian Robert Hunte (Saint Lucia) thanked Ambassador Dangue Rewaka (Gabon) for ably conducting negotiations on the text.


The Assembly then took up a draft resolution on 2001-2010:  Decade to Roll Back Malaria in Developing Countries, Particularly in Africa (document A/58/L.53), by which it would recognize the urgent need for scaling up national malaria control programmes if African countries are to meet the intermediate target set by the Abuja Summit in April 2000.  It would call on the international community to support the Decade’s partner organizations, including the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) as vital complementary sources of support for the efforts of malaria-endemic countries to combat the disease.


ANNEX I


Vote on Unilateral Economic Measures


The draft resolution on unilateral economic measures as a means of political and economic coercion against developing countries (document A/58/481/Add.1-B) was adopted by a recorded vote of 125 in favour to 1 against, with 37 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Serbia and Montenegro, Seychelles, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  United States.


Abstaining:  Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Israel, Japan, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Marshall Islands, Monaco, Norway, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine.


Absent:  Belgium, Bhutan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chad, Colombia, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Gambia, Georgia, Honduras, Iraq, Kiribati, Liberia, Malawi, New Zealand, Palau, Poland, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.


ANNEX II


Vote on Permanent Sovereignty over Natural Resources


The draft resolution on the permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the occupied Palestinian territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources (document A/58/493) was adopted by a recorded vote of 157 in favour to 4 against, with

10 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Serbia and Montenegro, Seychelles, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, United States.


Abstain:  Australia, Cameroon, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Honduras, Nauru, Nicaragua, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Tonga.


Absent:  Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Georgia, Iraq, Kiribati, Liberia, Malawi, Palau, Poland, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.


ANNEX III


Vote on Programme of Work


The draft decision on the provisional programme of the Second Committee for 2004 (document A/58/495-II) was adopted by a recorded vote of 167 in favour to

3 against, with no abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Serbia and Montenegro, Seychelles, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


Against:  Israel, Marshall Islands, United States.


Abstain:  None.


Absent:  Chad, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Georgia, Iraq, Kiribati, Kuwait, Liberia, Malawi, Palau, Poland, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu.


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