28/03/2002
Press Release
SC/7346



Security Council

4502nd Meeting (PM)


SECURITY COUNCIL, SUPPORTING ‘INCREMENTAL’ UN APPROACH TO PEACE-BUILDING

IN SOMALIA, ENDORSES WORKING MISSION TO REGION


The Security Council, underlining its strong resolve to support the United Nations system in its incremental approach to peace-building in Somalia, this afternoon endorsed a working mission to the region of interested Council members and Secretariat staff.  It also identified preparatory activities on the ground for a comprehensive peace-building mission there.


According to the statement (document S/PRST/2002/8) read out by Council President Ole Peter Kolby (Norway), the Council called for an immediate end to violence in Somalia and condemned the leaders of those armed factions who continued to impede peace and stability there.  The statement emphasized that peace efforts should not be held hostage to deliberate acts of violence, aimed at preventing the country’s return to normality and the setting up and rehabilitation of its governing structures. 


Underlining that the future of Somalia depended first on the commitment of Somali leaders to end the suffering of their people by negotiating a peaceful end to the conflict, the Council strongly urged all parties to participate constructively and at decision-making level in the Reconciliation Conference in Nairobi, scheduled for April 2002. 


Following up its public meeting of 11 March on Somalia, the Council asked the Secretary-General to utilize to the fullest his Representative, in close cooperation with the United Nations Resident Coordinator for Somalia, to coordinate ongoing peace-building activities and provide for their incremental expansion.  (For details of that meeting, see Press Release SC/7323).


Preparatory activities for a comprehensive peace-building mission should take the following elements into account:  community-based peace-building; disarmament, demobilization, rehabilitation and reintegration of militia, including child soldiers; assessing and combating illicit trade and trafficking of small arms; police training; quick-impact projects aimed at improving security; intensification of women’s participation at all levels in peace-building; intensification of dialogue on humanitarian and development issues, including local resolution of land claims; and AIDS education and prevention. 


The Council, insisting that persons and entities must not be allowed to take advantage of the situation in Somalia to finance, plan, facilitate, support or commit terrorist acts from the country, emphasized that efforts to combat terrorism there were inseparable from the establishment of peace and governance in that country. 

The Council further noted, with serious concern, the continued flow of weapons and ammunition supplies to Somalia from other countries, and called on all States and other actors to comply scrupulously with the arms embargo established by resolution 733 (1992) and to report any information on violations to the appropriate Committee. 


The meeting began at 3:25 p.m. and ended at 3:50 p.m.


Presidential Statement


The text of presidential statement S/PRST/2002/8, reads as follows:


“The Security Council recalls the Statements of its President of 31 October 2001 (S/PRST/2001/30) and of 11 January 2001 (S/PRST/2001/1) and all other previous decisions concerning the situation in Somalia.  The Council, having considered the report of the Secretary-General of 21 February 2002 (S/2002/189) and having held a public meeting on 11 March 2002, reaffirms its commitment to a comprehensive and lasting settlement of the situation in Somalia, reaffirming its respect for the sovereignty, territorial integrity, political independence and unity of the country, consistent with the principles of the Charter of the United Nations.


“The Security Council reiterates its support to the Arta peace process, which continues to be the most viable basis for peace and national reconciliation in Somalia.  The Council urges the Transitional National Government, local authorities and political and traditional leaders in Somalia to make every effort to complete, without preconditions, the peace and reconciliation process through dialogue and involvement of all parties in a spirit of mutual accommodation and tolerance, with the view to establish an all-inclusive government in Somalia based on the sharing and devolution of power through the democratic process.


“The Security Council strongly supports the decisions by the 9th Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) Summit and by the IGAD Foreign Ministers Committee on 14 February 2002 to convene a National Reconciliation Conference for Somalia in Nairobi in April 2002, including the Transitional National Government and all other Somali parties without conditionalities.  The Council strongly supports the call upon Kenya, Ethiopia and Djibouti (the frontline States) by the 9th IGAD Summit to coordinate their efforts for national reconciliation in Somalia under the supervision of the IGAD Chairman, and to hold the Reconciliation Conference under President Moi of Kenya as the coordinator of the frontline States to continue the peace process in Somalia and report to the IGAD Chairman.  The Council will follow the further developments closely and emphasises that the constructive and coordinated involvement by all frontline States is crucial for the restoration of peace and stability in Somalia.  The Council calls on all States in the region, including non-IGAD States, to contribute constructively to the peace efforts for Somalia, including by using their influence to bring on board Somali groups that have thus far not joined the peace process.  The Council encourages the Secretary-General, through his Special Advisor and the United Nations Political Office for Somalia (UNPOS), to support actively the IGAD initiative in the important period ahead.


“The Security Council, underlining that the future of Somalia depends, first of all, on the commitment of Somali leaders to end the suffering of their people by negotiating a peaceful end to the conflict, strongly urges all parties to participate constructively and at decision-making level in the Reconciliation Conference in Nairobi scheduled for April 2002.  The Council expresses its intention to consider the situation in Somalia taking into account the outcome of the Reconciliation Conference upon its conclusion, including with regard to participation in a constructive manner by the respective parties or any lack thereof.


“The Security Council, deeply concerned about the recent fighting in Mogadishu and in the Gedo region, calls for an immediate end to all acts of violence in Somalia.  The Council condemns the leaders of those armed factions who continue to be obstacles to peace and stability in Somalia. The Council emphasizes that the efforts for peace in the country should not be held hostage to deliberate acts of violence or other acts aimed at preventing the country from returning to normality and the setting up and rehabilitation of its governing structures.


“The Security Council notes with serious concern the continued flow of weapons and ammunition supplies to Somalia from other countries and the reported training of militia and plans for major offensives in southern and north-eastern parts of the country.  The Council is also concerned about the illicit trafficking and trade in small arms in the entire subregion.  The Council insists that no State, in particular those of the region, should interfere in the internal affairs of Somalia.  Such interference only further destabilizes Somalia, contributes to a climate of fear and impacts adversely on individual human rights, and could jeopardize the sovereignty, territorial integrity, political independence and unity of the country.  The Council insists that the territory of Somalia should not be used to undermine stability in the subregion.  The Council emphasizes that the situation in Somalia and the objective of long-term regional stability can most effectively be addressed if all States in the region play a positive role, including in the process of rebuilding national institutions in Somalia.


“The Security Council calls on all States and other actors to comply scrupulously with the arms embargo established by resolution 733 (1992) of

23 January 1992 and to report all information on any violations to the Committee established pursuant to resolution 751 (1992) of 24 April 1992.  The Council expresses its determination to put in place concrete arrangements and/or mechanisms, by 30 April 2002, for the generation of independent information on violations and for improving the enforcement of the embargo.


“The Security Council emphasizes the necessity for further efforts against international terrorism in accordance with resolution 1373 (2001) of 28 September 2001.  The Council notes the commitment of the Transitional National Government to combat international terrorism and welcomes the report submitted in this regard (S/2001/1287).  The Council further notes the stated intentions by local authorities in various parts of the country to take steps pursuant to resolution 1373.  The Council, insisting that persons and entities must not be allowed to take advantage of the situation in Somalia to finance, plan, facilitate, support or commit terrorist acts from the country, emphasizes that efforts to combat terrorism in Somalia are inseparable from the establishment of peace and governance in the country.  In this spirit, the Council urges the international community to provide assistance to Somalia for the further and comprehensive implementation of resolution 1373.


“The Security Council notes that the downturn in remittances and freezing of accounts of individuals following the closing of the offices of the Al-Barakaat Group reduced household incomes in Somalia.  The Council underlines, as a matter of urgency, the necessity to develop mechanisms that facilitate legitimate financial transfer to and from Somalia while preventing further financial flows to terrorists and terrorist groups, taking fully into account the different concerns involved.  The Council is encouraged by the initiative by the United Nations Development Programme to establish a monitoring and regulatory framework for money transfer companies to facilitate their operations locally and internationally.


“The Security Council expresses concern about the humanitarian situation in Somalia, particularly in the Gedo and Bari regions.  The Council draws attention to the urgent need for international assistance, inter alia, in covering food and water shortfalls, thereby also combating potentially further destabilizing migration and outbreak of disease.  It further underlines that longer-term interventions are required to stimulate economic recovery, rebuild household asset bases and promote sustained productivity.  The Council calls on Member States to respond urgently and generously to the United Nations Consolidated Inter-Agency Appeal for 2002.


“The Security Council, noting that problems in livestock exports have severely affected the humanitarian and economic situation in Somalia, welcomes the lifting of the export ban by some States, and calls on States who maintain the ban to take active steps towards the resumption of livestock imports from Somalia.  The Council appreciates the efforts by the United Nations Development Programme and the Food and Agricultural Organization to promote the lifting of the ban imposed by a number of States.


“The Security Council notes the recent security assessment of the Inter- Agency Mission to Somalia.  The Council further notes that the security regime will follow the UN practice of incremental engagement with Somali communities that are moving towards peace through constant evaluation of security conditions.  The Council requests the Secretary-General to keep the security situation under review, including through regular inter-agency Headquarters assessment missions.


“The Security Council notes with satisfaction that, in spite of the difficult security conditions, the United Nations, the Red Cross and Red Crescent movements and non-governmental organizations continue to provide humanitarian and development assistance to all areas of Somalia.  The Council condemns attacks on humanitarian personnel and calls upon all parties in Somalia to respect fully the security and safety of personnel of the United Nations, the International Committee of the Red Cross and non-governmental organizations, and to guarantee their complete freedom of movement and access throughout Somalia.


“The Security Council values the desire of the Transitional National Government and various local authorities in Somalia to cooperate with the United Nations in creating an enabling environment for humanitarian and development assistance, and commends the peace-building activities currently implemented by United Nations agencies in the country.  The Council notes that safe access for staff and assets of the United Nations, the Red Cross and Red Crescent movements and non-governmental organizations already exists in a number of areas. It further notes the trend towards improved security conditions in a number of areas in the north, middle and south of Somalia, in accordance with the Secretary-General’s report.


“The Security Council notes the recommendation by the Secretary-General that the international community must increase its programmes of assistance to Somalia in creative and innovative ways, wherever the security situation allows, including by making greater efforts to ensure that the peace dividend aspect of targeted assistance is fully exploited.  The Council reiterates that a comprehensive post-conflict peace building mission should be deployed once security conditions permit.


“The Security Council requests the Secretary-General, as a matter of urgency and under the current circumstances, to utilize to the fullest his Representative, in close cooperation with the UN Resident Coordinator for Somalia, to coordinate ongoing peace-building activities and provide for their incremental expansion, including staff strengthening, in a coherent manner and in accordance with the security arrangements.  Preparatory activities on the ground for a comprehensive peace-building mission should take the following elements into account, while also considering other proposals for post-conflict peace-building activities:


(a)   community based peace-building;


(b)   disarmament, demobilization, rehabilitation and reintegration of militia, including in particular child soldiers;


(c)   assessing and combating illicit trade and trafficking of small arms;


(d)   training of police with a view to establishing uniform standards of law enforcement throughout Somalia;


(e)   quick impact projects aimed at improving security;


(f)   intensification of women’s participation at all levels in peace building;


(g)   intensification of dialogue on humanitarian and development issues, including resolution of land claims at the local level;


(h)   AIDS education and prevention.


“The Security Council requests the Secretary-General to establish, without further delay, a Trust Fund for Peace Building in Somalia to support the preparatory activities on the ground for a comprehensive peace-building mission and supplement the United Nations Consolidated Inter-Agency Appeal, as envisaged in his report of 19 December 2000 (S/2000/1211) and as indicated through the statement of its President of 11 January 2001 (S/PRST/2001/1) and of 31 October 2001 (S/PRST/2001/30), and invites donors to come forward and make contributions at an early stage.


“The Security Council, underlining its strong resolve to support in a practical manner the United Nations system in its incremental approach to peace- building in Somalia in line with the present statement, endorses a working mission to the region at the appropriate level consisting of interested members of the Council and Secretariat staff.  It would welcome the facilitation and inputs by UNPOS and the United Nations Country Team for Somalia in this regard.  The Council expresses its determination to address, based on the report to be submitted by the mission and the upcoming report by the Secretary-General, how it may further support in a practical and concrete manner the peace efforts in Somalia on a comprehensive basis.


“The Security Council endorses the establishment of Somalia Contact Group, to operate in Nairobi and New York.  The Council invites the Nairobi branch of the Contact Group, inter alia, to promote the completion of the Arta peace process, including through the IGAD initiative referred to above; to support the implementation of the pilot peace building programme, as stipulated above; and to elaborate practical ways and means of facilitating exchange of information through engaging various actors in the region, including the community of non-governmental organizations.  The Council further underlines that the primary purpose of the New York branch of the Contact Group should be to support the Secretariat’s work on Somalia with the view to ensure that the situation in the country is given due consideration by the United Nations.


“The Security Council welcomes the appointment of Mr. Winston A. Tubman as the new Representative of the Secretary-General and head of the United Nations Political Office for Somalia upon his assumption of duties in Nairobi in April 2002.  The Council expresses its gratitude to the departing Representative,

Mr. David Stephen, for his tireless efforts over four years in support of national reconciliation in Somalia.


“The Security Council requests the Secretary-General to address fully the requirements of the present statement in his report due on 30 June 2002.


“The Security Council remains seized of the matter.”


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