16/10/2001
Press Release
GA/SPD/215



Fifty-sixth General Assembly

Fourth Committee

7th Meeting (AM)


SELF-DETERMINATION FOR NON-SELF-GOVERNING TERRITORIES REAFFIRMED

IN DRAFT RESOLUTION APPROVED BY FOURTH COMMITTEE


Acting on Decolonization Questions, Committee

Recommends Eight Resolutions, Two Decisions to General Assembly


The General Assembly would reaffirm that the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories must ultimately freely determine their future political status, by the terms of a draft resolution approved by the Fourth Committee (Special Political and Decolonization) this morning.


The Committee approved that two-part consolidated text on small island Territories without a vote, as it took action on eight draft resolutions and two draft decisions concerning decolonization questions.  Also by the text, the Assembly would call upon the administering Powers, in cooperation with the territorial governments, to facilitate political education programmes in the Territories to foster awareness of the right to self-determination.


Further, the Assembly would call upon the administering Powers to enter into a constructive dialogue with the Special Committee on decolonization to develop a framework to implement provisions of Article 73 e of the United Nations Charter and the Declaration on decolonization, for the period 2001 to 2010 -- the Second International Decade for the Eradication of Colonialism.


The second part of the draft text concerns the individual Non-Self- Governing Territories of American Samoa, Anguilla, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Guam, Montserrat, Pitcairn, Saint Helena, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the United States Virgin Islands.


Also without a vote, the Committee approved a draft resolution on the question of Tokelau by which the Assembly would note the special challenge inherent in the situation in Tokelau -- among the smallest of the Territories -- and how the exercise of a Territory’s inalienable right to self-determination might be brought closer, as in Tokelau, by meeting that challenge in an innovative way.


Further, the Assembly would acknowledge the continuing support that New Zealand had committed to Tokelau's Modern House governance project in 2001-2002.  It would welcome the assurance of the New Zealand Government that it would meet its obligations to the United Nations with respect to Tokelau and abide by the


freely expressed wishes of the Territory's people with regard to their future status.


By a draft resolution on the question of Western Sahara, also approved without a vote, as orally revised, the Assembly would urge the two parties to continue cooperating with the Secretary-General, his Personal Envoy and his Special Representative, and to refrain from undertaking anything that would undermine the implementation of the Settlement Plan.  It would call upon the two parties to cooperate fully in implementing that Plan's various phases and in overcoming the remaining difficulties.


Also by the text, the Assembly would encourage the parties to continue their discussions under the auspices of the Secretary-General's Personal Envoy, with a view to reaching a mutually acceptable agreement.  It would further urge the parties to solve the problem of the fate of people unaccounted for, and call on them to release without further delay all those held since the start of the Western Sahara conflict.


The Committee also approved a draft resolution on economic and other activities affecting the interests of non-self-governing peoples, by a recorded vote of 94 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 2 abstentions (France, United Kingdom).  By the text, the General Assembly would reiterate that the damaging exploitation and plundering of the marine and other natural resources of the Non-Self-Governing Territories, in violation of the relevant United Nations resolutions, is a threat to their integrity and prosperity.  (For details, see Annex II.)


In another action, the Committee approved a draft resolution on information from Non-Self-Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73 e of the United Nations Charter.  By that text, the Assembly would request the administering Powers concerned to transmit to the Secretary-General under Article 73 e, the fullest possible information on political and constitutional developments in the Territories concerned. The text was approved by a recorded vote of 86 in favour to none against, with 3 abstentions (France, United Kingdom, United States)(Annex I).


The Committee also approved, by 55 votes in favour to 40 against, with no abstentions, a draft decision on military activities and arrangements by colonial Powers in Territories under their administration.  By its terms, the Assembly would deplore the continued alienation of land in colonial and Non-Self-Governing Territories, particularly in the small island Territories of the Pacific and Caribbean regions, for military installations (Annex III).


In further action, the Committee approved a draft resolution on implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations.  That text would have the Assembly request those bodies to examine and review conditions in each Territory so as to take appropriate measures to accelerate their economic and social progress.  The text was approved by 65 votes in favour to none against, with

40 abstentions (Annex IV).


(page 1b follows)


Acting without a vote, the Committee also approved draft resolutions concerning offers by Member States of study and training facilities for inhabitants of Non-Self-Governing Territories and the question of New Caledonia, as well as a draft decision on the question of Gibraltar.


Speaking in explanation of position this morning were the representatives of the United Kingdom, Belgium (on behalf of the European Union), Antigua and Barbuda, Senegal, Morocco, Algeria, Spain, Nepal, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Saudi Arabia, Dominican Republic, Yemen, Uruguay, Djibouti, Australia, South Africa, Nauru, Namibia, Congo, Cameroon and Burkina Faso.


The representatives of the United Kingdom spoke in exercise of the right of reply.


Leslie Wilkinson, Committee Secretary, made a statement on the budgetary implications of implementing the draft resolutions concerning specific Non-Self-Governing Territories.


At its next meeting, at 3 p.m., Wednesday, 17 October, the Committee will begin its general debate on the effects of atomic radiation.


Background


The Fourth Committee (Special Political and Decolonization) met this morning to take action on eight draft resolutions and two draft decisions relating to decolonization issues.  The following are listed in the order in which the Committee was expected to take action.


Among the drafts before the Committee was a text on information from Non-Self-Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73 e of the United Nations Charter (document A/56/23, Part III, chap. XIII) by which the General Assembly would request the administering Powers concerned to transmit to the Secretary-General under Article 73 e, the fullest possible information on political and constitutional developments in the Territories concerned.  It would also request the Secretary-General to continue to ensure that adequate information is drawn from all available published sources in connection with the preparation of working papers relating to the Territories concerned.


By a draft on economic and other activities which affect the interests of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories (document A/56/23, Part III, chap. XIII), the Assembly would reiterate that the damaging exploitation and plundering of the marine and other natural resources of the Non-Self-Governing Territories, in violation of the relevant United Nations resolutions, is a threat to the integrity and prosperity of those Territories.


The Assembly would decide, by other terms, to follow the situation in the Territories so as to ensure that all economic activities there are aimed at strengthening and diversifying their economies in the interest of their peoples, including the indigenous populations, and at promoting their economic and financial viability.


Also by that text, the Assembly would call once again on all governments that have not yet done so to take legislative, administrative or other measures in respect of their nationals and the bodies corporate under their jurisdiction that own and operate enterprises in the Territories that are detrimental to the interests of the inhabitants of those Territories, in order to end such enterprises.


Further, the Assembly would urge the administering Powers to take effective measures to safeguard and guarantee the inalienable right of the peoples of the Territories to their natural resources and to establish and maintain control over the future development of those resources.  It would request the administering Powers to take all necessary steps to protect the property rights of the peoples of those Territories.


By a draft decision on military activities and arrangements by colonial Powers in Territories under their administration (document A/56/23, Part III, chap. XIII), the General Assembly would deplore the continued alienation of land in colonial and Non-Self-Governing Territories, particularly in the small island Territories of the Pacific and Caribbean regions, for military installations.  It would once again call on the administering Powers concerned to terminate military activities and to eliminate military bases in compliance with the relevant resolutions of the General Assembly. 


In addition, the Assembly would reiterate that the colonial and Non-Self-Governing Territories and adjacent areas should not be used for nuclear testing, dumping of nuclear wastes or deployment of nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction.  By other terms, it would reaffirm its strong conviction that military bases and installations in the Territories could constitute an obstacle to the exercise by the people of those Territories of their right to self-determination, and reiterate that existing bases and installations should be withdrawn. 


Also before the Committee was a draft resolution on implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations (document A/56/23, Part III, chap. XIII).  It would have the General Assembly request those bodies, as well as international and regional organizations, to examine and review conditions in each Territory so as to take appropriate measures to accelerate progress in the economic sectors of the Territories.


By other terms of the text, the Assembly would request those bodies to provide information on:  environmental problems facing the Territories; the impact of natural disasters, beach and coastal erosion and droughts on those Territories; ways to assist them to fight drug trafficking, money laundering and other illegal and criminal activities; and the illegal exploitation of the marine resources of the Territories and the need to use them for the benefit of their peoples.  The Assembly would encourage the Territories to establish and/or strengthen disaster preparedness and management institutions and policies.


In addition, the Assembly would request the administering Powers to facilitate the participation of appointed and elected territorial representatives in the relevant meetings and conferences of the specialized agencies and other organizations of the United Nations system, so that the Territories may benefit from the related activities of those bodies. 


The Committee also had before it a draft on offers by Member States of study and training facilities for inhabitants of Non-Self-Governing Territories (document A/C.4/56/L.3) by which the Assembly would invite all States to continue to make offers of study and training facilities, along with assistance for travel, to inhabitants of Territories that have not yet attained self-government, and express appreciation for those States that have already done so.  By other terms, it would urge administering Powers to ensure the widespread and continuous dissemination of information about such offers, and provide facilities necessary for students to avail themselves of those study and training opportunities.


A text on the question of Western Sahara (document A/C.4/56/L.2) would have the Assembly reiterate its support for the Secretary-General's further efforts to organize and supervise, in cooperation with the Organization of African Unity (OAU), an impartial and free self-determination referendum in conformity with Security Council resolutions 658 (1990) and 690 (1991), by which the Council approved the Settlement Plan for Western Sahara.


Also by that draft, the Assembly would reaffirm the responsibility of the United Nations towards the people of Western Sahara, as provided for in the Settlement Plan.  It would urge Morocco and the Popular Front for the Liberation of Saguia el-Hamra and Rio de Oro (POLISARIO Front) to implement faithfully and loyally the Secretary-General's package of measures for the identification of voters and the appeals process. 


The Assembly would, by other terms, urge the two parties to continue cooperating with the Secretary-General, his Personal Envoy and his Special Representative, and to refrain from undertaking anything that would undermine the implementation of the Settlement Plan.  It would call upon the two parties to cooperate fully in implementing the Settlement Plan's various phases and in overcoming the remaining difficulties.


Also by the text, the Assembly would encourage the parties to continue their discussions under the auspices of the Personal Envoy, with a view to reaching a mutually acceptable agreement.  It would further urge the parties to solve the problem of the fate of people unaccounted for, and call on them to release without further delay all those held since the start of the Western Sahara conflict.


By a draft decision on the question of Gibraltar (document A/C.4/56/L.4), the Assembly would urge Spain and the United Kingdom to continue their negotiations on a range of matters related to that question, including the issue of sovereignty, with the aim of reaching a definitive solution.  In that regard, the Assembly would take note of annual meetings held alternately in each capital, the most recent of which was held in London on 26 July 2001.


Also before the Committee was a text on the question of New Caledonia (document A/56/23 (Part III), chap. XIII) by which the Assembly would urge all the parties involved, in the interest of all the people of New Caledonia, to maintain, in the framework of the Noumea Accord, their dialogue in a spirit of harmony.  [The Noumea Accord was signed on 5 May 1998 by representatives of New Caledonia and the French Government.]


In addition, the Committee would invite all the parties to continue promoting a framework for the peaceful progress of the Territory towards an act of self-determination, in which all options are open and which would safeguard the rights of all New Caledonians according to the letter and spirit of the Noumea Accord, which is based on the principle that it is for the populations of New Caledonia to choose how to control their destiny. 


By the terms of a text on the question of Tokelau (document A/56/23 (Part III), chap. XIII), The General Assembly would take note of Tokelau’s desire to move at its own pace towards self-determination.  It would also note the special challenge, inherent in the situation in Tokelau -- the smallest of the Non-Self-Governing Territories -- and how the exercise of a Territory’s inalienable right to self-determination might be brought closer, as in Tokelau, by meeting that challenge in an innovative way.


By further terms, the draft would welcome the assurance of the Government of New Zealand that it would meet its obligations to the United Nations with respect to Tokelau and abide by the freely expressed wishes of the Territory's people with regard to their future status.  By other terms, the Assembly would call upon the administering Power and the United Nations agencies to continue their assistance to Tokelau, as it further developed its economy and governance structures within the context of its ongoing constitutional evolution.


The Committee also had before it a consolidated text concerning American Samoa, Anguilla, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Guam, Montserrat, Pitcairn, Saint Helena, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the United States Virgin Islands (document A/56/23 (Part III), chap. XIII).


By Part A of that draft, the General Assembly would reaffirm the inalienable right of the peoples of the Territories to self-determination, including -- if they so wish -- independence.  It would reaffirm also that it is ultimately for those peoples to determine freely their future political status and, in that connection, call upon the administering Powers, in cooperation with the territorial governments, to facilitate political education programmes in the Territories to foster awareness of the right to self-determination.


Also by that text, the Assembly would reaffirm that United Nations visiting missions to the Territories, in consultation with the administering Powers, are an effective means of ascertaining the situation in the Territories.  The administering Powers and the peoples’ elected representatives would be requested to assist the Special Committee on Decolonization in this regard.  The Assembly would reaffirm also the responsibility of the administering Powers to promote the Territories’ economic and social development, preserve their cultural identity, protect their environments, and give priority, in consultation with the territorial governments, to strengthening and diversifying their economies.


Further, the Assembly would call upon the administering Powers to enter into constructive dialogue with the Special Committee to develop a framework to implement provisions of Article 73 e of the Charter and the decolonization Declaration, for the period 2001 to 2010.


By other terms, the Assembly would take note of statements by the elected territorial representatives that their respective Territories have repeatedly shown their willingness to cooperate with all international efforts aimed at preventing abuse of the international financial system and promoting regulatory environments with highly selective licensing procedures, robust supervisory practices and well-established anti-money-laundering regimes.


The Assembly would, by further terms, call upon the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to engage the concerned territorial governments in a constructive dialogue, with a view to removing them from the list of harmful tax jurisdictions, and request the administering Power concerned to assist those Non-Self-Governing Territories in resolving the matter.


Part B of the consolidated draft resolution deals with the individual Territories.  Regarding American Samoa, the General Assembly would call upon the administering Power to continue to assist the territorial government in the Territory's economic and social development, including measures to rebuild financial management capabilities and strengthen other functions of the territorial government.  Also, the Assembly would welcome the invitation from the territorial governor to the Special Committee to send a visiting mission to the Territory.


By the text on Anguilla, the Assembly would request the administering Power, bearing in mind the views of the Territory's people ascertained through a democratic process, to keep the Secretary-General informed of the wishes and aspirations of the people regarding their future political status.  It would call upon the administering Power and all States, organizations and United Nations agencies to continue to assist the Territory in social and economic development.


The draft on Bermuda would have the Assembly call upon the administering Power to continue to work with the Territory for its socio-economic development.  It would also request the administering Power to elaborate, in consultation with the territorial government, programmes specifically intended to alleviate the economic, social and environmental consequences of the closure of United States military bases and installations in the Territory;


According to the text on the British Virgin Islands, the Assembly would request the administering Power, the specialized agencies and other United Nations bodies, and all financial institutions to continue to assist the Territory’s socio-economic and human resources development, bearing in mind the vulnerability of the Territory to external factors.


By the draft on the Cayman Islands, the Assembly would call upon the administering Power and the territorial government to cooperate in countering problems related to money laundering, and smuggling of funds and other related crimes, as well as drug trafficking.  It would request the administering Power, in consultation with the territorial government, to continue to facilitate the expansion of the current programme of securing employment for the local population, in particular, at the decision-making level.


Under the provisions on the text relating to Guam, the Assembly would call upon the administering Power to take into consideration the expressed will of the Chamorro people as supported by Guam voters in the plebiscite of 1987 and as provided for in Guam law, and encourage the administering Power and the territorial government to enter into negotiations on the matter.  It would request the administering Power to cooperate with Guam's Commission on Decolonization for the Implementation and Exercise of Chamorro Self-Determination, with a view to facilitating Guam’s decolonization and to keep the Secretary-General informed of progress to that end.


Also by the text, the Assembly would further request the administering Power to continue to recognize and respect the political rights -- and the cultural and ethnic identity -- of the Chamorro people of Guam, and take all necessary measures to respond to the concerns of the territorial government with regard to the immigration issue.  The administering Power would be requested to continue to transfer land to the Territory's original landowners.  The Assembly would request the administering Power to cooperate in establishing programmes specifically intended to promote the sustainable development of economic activities and enterprises, noting the special role of the Chamorro people in Guam's development.


The text on Montserrat would have the Assembly call upon the administering Power, the specialized agencies and other organizations of the United Nations system, as well as regional and other organizations, to continue to provide urgent emergency assistance to the Territory to alleviate the consequences of the 1996 volcanic eruption.  It would welcome the support of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) in the construction of housing in the safe zone, to alleviate a shortage caused by the eruption of Montsoufriere volcano, as well as the material and financial support of the international community.


By the draft resolution on Pitcairn, the Assembly would request the administering Power to continue its assistance for the improvement of the economic, social, educational and other conditions of the Territory’s population.  It would call upon the administering Power to continue its discussion with the representatives of Pitcairn Island on how best to support their economic security.


The draft on Saint Helena, the Assembly would request the administering Power and relevant regional and international organizations to continue to support the efforts of the territorial government to address the Territory’s high unemployment, limited transport, communications and other socio-economic development problems.  It would note that the administering Power had taken note of statements by members of the Legislative Council of Saint Helena about the constitution and is prepared to discuss them further with the Territory's people.


According to the text on the Turks and Caicos Islands, the Assembly would invite the administering Power to take fully into account the wishes and interests of the Government and the people of the Turks and Caicos Islands in the Territory's governance.  It would welcome the assessment of the Caribbean Development Bank, in its 1998 report, that the economy continued to expand with considerable output and low inflation.


By the draft on the United States Virgin Islands, the Assembly would express concern that the Territory, which is already heavily indebted, had to borrow $21 million from a commercial bank to carry out its year 2000 computer compliance programme, and call for the United Nations year 2000 programme to be made available to the Non-Self-Governing Territories.  Further, the Assembly would express concern that the territorial government is facing severe fiscal problems, resulting in accumulated debt of more than $1 billion.  It would welcome the measures being taken by the newly elected territorial government in addressing the crisis, including the adoption of a five-year operating and strategic financial plan, and call upon the administering Power to provide every assistance required by the Territory to alleviate the financial crisis, including the provision of debt relief and loans.


Action on drafts


By a recorded vote of 86 in favour to none against with 3 abstentions (France, United Kingdom, United States), the Committee approved draft resolution I on information from Non-Self-Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73 e of the United Nations Charter.  (For details see Annex I.)


The representative of the United Kingdom, speaking in explanation of the vote, said that while her country had abstained, as in previous years, it did not take issue with the draft's main objective and continued to meet its obligations in that regard.  However, the decision as to whether a Non-Self-Governing Territory had reached a level of self-government sufficient to relieve the administering Power of the obligation to submit information under Article 73 e was ultimately for that Territory's government and the administering Power concerned, not the General Assembly.


Taking up draft resolution II, on economic and other activities which affect the interests of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories, the Committee approved it by a recorded 94 votes in favour to 1 against (United States), with 2 abstentions (France, United Kingdom) (Annex II).


It then took up a draft decision on military activities and arrangements by colonial Powers in Territories under their administration, approving that text by a recorded vote of 55 in favour to 40 against, with no abstentions (Annex III).


Belgium's representative, explaining the European Union's vote, urged the Special Committee on Decolonization to continue efforts to propose, in the future, balanced texts that could attract the broadest possible support.  The question covered by the draft decision on military activities did not appear on the agenda given by the General Assembly to the Fourth Committee and, hence, fell outside its sphere of competence.  Consequently, as in previous years, the European Union had voted against the text.


The Committee then took up draft resolution III on implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations.  That text was approved by a recorded 65 votes in favour to none against, with 40 abstentions (Annex IV).


Explaining the European Union's vote, Belgium's representative said that while the Union supported the efforts of those bodies to offer humanitarian and educational assistance to Non-Self-Governing Territories, its member States had abstained because the status of those agencies must be scrupulously respected.


Also explaining his vote, the representative of Antigua and Barbuda said he had voted in favour because the resolution served as a legislative mandate for the agencies to provide assistance to the Non-Self-Governing Territories.  A review indicated, however, that though such agencies as the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) had fulfilled their obligations under the resolution, most others had not done so.  He expressed deep regret that valuable information on the issue was lacking, due to the withdrawal from discussions of the representative of the United States Virgin Islands Government.  The lack of consensus on the draft resolution should not be accepted as routine and discussions should be held to reach consensus language, he added.


The Committee then approved, without a vote, a draft resolution on offers by Member States of study and training facilities for inhabitants of Non-Self-Governing Territories.


It then took up draft resolutions relating to specific Territories.


LESLIE WILKINSON, Secretary of the Committee, stated that the Secretary-General had reviewed the Special Committee's recommendations concerning the questions of New Caledonia, Tokelau, American Samoa, Anguilla, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Guam, Montserrat, Pitcairn, Saint Helena, Turks and Caicos Islands and the United States Virgin Islands.


Guided by the prior programme budget performances over several biennia, she said, it was assumed that implementation of those recommendations would not give rise to additional costs or programmatic changes since they could be met within the provisions made under Section 2, General Assembly Affairs and Conferences Services, of the proposed programme budget for the 2002-2003 biennium.


With respect to operative paragraphs 9 and 10 of the draft on Western Sahara, she said the Secretary-General had submitted to the Security Council his reports S/2001/398 and S/2001/613 on the situation in the Territory, outlining his recommendations regarding the implementation of the Settlement Plan.  The financing of the United Nations Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara (MINURSO) was under separate arrangements and, therefore, had no additional budgetary implications.


Taking up the draft resolution on the question of Western Sahara, the Committee approved it without a vote, as orally revised.


Speaking in explanation of vote position after that action, Senegal's representative said his country continued to support the new dynamic of peace, supporting also the Security Council's efforts and encouraging the parties to pursue, through bona fide negotiations under the draft framework agreement, a political solution to the Western Sahara question.


Also explaining his vote, Morocco's representative welcomed the newly-introduced elements in the draft resolution, which were in line with the Secretary-General's efforts of the Secretary-General and his Personal Envoy in favour of an alternative to the Settlement Plan, which was obviously in deadlock.


He also welcomed the fact that the General Assembly had recalled the obligations under international humanitarian law to release without further delay all persons detained in camps.  Morocco hoped that those who had not yet done so would clarify their position regarding the draft framework agreement on the status of Western Sahara.


Algeria's representative, also speaking in explanation of vote, said the resolution indicated the international community's continuing support for the Saharawi people and for a political solution through a free and impartial referendum within the agreed-upon United Nations peace plan.  During the rich and substantial discussion in the Committee, a range of States had supported the Saharawi cause and the Settlement Plan as the only way to ensure a just and lasting peace in Western Sahara.


The Committee then took up a draft decision on the question of Gibraltar, approving that text without a vote.


Taking up draft resolution IV on the question on New Caledonia, it also approved that text without a vote.


Acting again without a vote, it then approved draft resolution V on the question of Tokelau.


The Committee then took up a consolidated draft resolution on the Non-Self-Governing Territories of American Samoa, Anguilla, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Guam, Montserrat, Pitcairn, Saint Helena, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the United States Virgin Islands.  It approved the two-part text without a vote.


Speaking in explanation of position, the United Kingdom's representative welcomed the 1999 assessment by the Caribbean Development Bank of Anguilla and the Turks and Caicos Islands, as well as its 2000 report to the Committee.  She shared the Committee’s concern over unemployment in Saint Helena and drew its attention to joint action by the United Kingdom and the territorial government in that regard, including a pilot fund to support economic diversification.  She also welcomed the call for continued discussions with representatives of Pitcairn on economic security.


Spain's representative, explaining his vote, associated himself with the consensus in support the resolution.  He noted, however, that the principle of self-determination was not the only requirement for the resolution of the questions involved.  In the case of Gibraltar, various General Assembly resolutions should be applied.


Nepal's representative said his delegation had been unable to arrive in time for the voting.  Nepal would have voted in favour of draft resolutions I and II, as well as the draft decision on military arrangements.


The representative of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea said his delegation had been similarly held up and would have voted in favour of all the texts.


Saudi Arabia's delegate said he would have voted in favour of draft resolutions I, II, III and IV.


The representative of the Dominican Republic said his delegation would have supported draft resolution I.


Yemen's representative said he would have voted in favour of all the texts.


Uruguay's representative said he would have voted in favour of draft resolution I.


Djibouti's delegate said he would have supported draft resolution I.


Australia's representative said he would have voted in favour of draft resolutions I and II.  He had intended to vote in favour of draft resolution III, but had incorrectly abstained.


South Africa's representative said his delegation would have voted in favour of all the texts.


Nauru's delegate said he would have voted in favour of all the draft resolutions.


Namibia's representative said he would have voted in favour of draft resolution I.


The representative of Congo said he would have supported draft resolutions I, II, III and IV.


Cameroon's representative said he would have voted in favour of all the texts approved this morning.


Burkina Faso's delegate said he would have voted in favour of draft resolution I.


Right of Reply


Responding to the representative of Spain, the United Kingdom's representative recalled her country's position on Gibraltar as stated in the General Assembly on 14 September 2000. 


(annexes follow)


ANNEX I


Vote on Information from Non-Self-Governing Territories


The draft resolution on information from Non-Self-Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73e (document A/56/23 (Part III), A-Draft Resolution I) was approved by a recorded vote of 86 in favour to none against with 3 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Belarus, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Mexico, Morocco, Myanmar, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, San Marino, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Spain, Sudan, Swaziland, Sweden, Syria, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela, Yugoslavia, Zambia.


Against:  None.


Abstain:  France, United Kingdom, United States.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Albania, Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Gabon, Gambia, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Honduras, Israel, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kiribati, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Federated States of Micronesia, Monaco, Mongolia, Mozambique, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Republic of Moldova, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Suriname, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zimbabwe.


(END OF ANNEX I)


ANNEX II


Vote on Economic Activities Affecting Non-Self-Governing Territories


The draft resolution on economic and other activities which affect the interests of the people of Non-Self-Governing Territories (document A/56/23 (Part III, B-Draft Resolution II)) was approved by a recorded vote of 94 in favour to 1 against, with 2 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Belarus, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lebanon, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Mexico, Myanmar, Namibia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, San Marino, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Spain, Sudan, Swaziland, Sweden, Syria, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yugoslavia, Zambia.


Against:  United States.


Abstain:  France, United Kingdom.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Albania, Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Honduras, Israel, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Malawi, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Federated States of Micronesia, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Nauru, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Republic of Moldova, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Suriname, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zimbabwe.


(END OF ANNEX II)


ANNEX III


Vote on Military Activities in Non-Self-Governing Territories


The draft decision on military activities and arrangements by colonial Powers in Territories under their administration (document A/56/23 (Part III, H)) was approved by a recorded vote of 55 in favour to 40 against, with no abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Bahrain, Belarus, Bolivia, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Chile, China, Colombia, Cyprus, Djibouti, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gambia, Ghana, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Mexico, Myanmar, Namibia, Oman, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Lucia, Singapore, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Thailand, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Zambia.


Against:  Andorra, Armenia, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Yugoslavia.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Albania, Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Gabon, Georgia Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Honduras, Israel, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kiribati, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Malawi, Maldives, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Federated States of Micronesia, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Nauru, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Republic of Moldova, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Suriname, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zimbabwe.


(END OF ANNEX III)


ANNEX IV


Vote on Implementation by Specialized Agencies


The draft resolution on the implementation of the Declaration on decolonization by the specialized agencies and international institutions associated with the United Nations (document A/56/23 (Part III, C- Draft Resolution III)) was approved by a recorded vote of 65 in favour to none against, with 40 abstentions, as follows:


In favour:  Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Belarus, Bolivia, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Ghana, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Kenya, Kuwait, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mexico, Morocco, Myanmar, Namibia, New Zealand, Oman, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Qatar, Saint Lucia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Thailand, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia.


Against:  None.


Abstain:  Andorra, Armenia, Australia, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Yugoslavia.


Absent:  Afghanistan, Albania, Austria, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Gabon, Gambia, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Honduras, Israel, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Malawi, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Federated States of Micronesia, Monaco, Mongolia, Mozambique, Nauru, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Republic of Moldova, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Suriname, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Vanuatu, Zimbabwe.


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