9/11/2001
Press Release
SC/7203



Security Council

4409th Meeting (AM)


SECURITY COUNCIL CALLS ON ‘ALL WOMEN AND MEN OF KOSOVO’ TO VOTE

IN 17 NOVEMBER PROVINCE-WIDE ELECTIONS


Presidential Statement Welcomes Yugoslav President’s

Helpful Role in Recommending Kosovo Serb Participation


The Security Council this morning called upon all women and men of

Kosovo, Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, to vote in the Kosovo-wide elections on  17 November 2001.


In a statement read out by its President, Mignonette Patricia Durrant (Jamaica), the Council welcomed the helpful role played by the President of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, Vodislav Kostunica, his Government and that of the Republic of Serbia in recommending Kosovo Serb participation in the elections. Their participation, the Council states, would allow them to participate in shaping the province’s multi-ethnic future.


The Council also welcomed the signing on 5 November of the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK)/Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Common document, which was consistent with resolution 1244 (1999) and the Constitutional Framework for Provisional Self-Government in the province.


By the statement, the Council encouraged the further development of a constructive dialogue between UNMIK and the authorities of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and emphasized the responsibility of the provisional institutions of self-government and all concerned to fully respect the final status of resolution 1244 (1999).  It also underlined its continued commitment to the full implementation of that resolution which remained the basis for building Kosovo’s future.


The meeting began at 10:34 a.m. and adjourned at 10:40 a.m.


Presidential Statement


The full text of the statement, which will be issued as S/PRST/2001/34, reads as follows:


“The Security Council welcomes the progress made in preparing the Kosovo-wide elections on 17 November 2001 and calls on the Special Representative of the Secretary-General and all parties concerned to continue to strive for full implementation of resolution 1244 (1999) of 10 June 1999.  It further calls upon all women and men of Kosovo, Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, to vote.

“The Security Council welcomes the helpful role played by the President of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and the Governments of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and the Republic of Serbia in recommending Kosovo Serb participation in the elections.  Participation will allow them to take part in shaping Kosovo’s multi-ethnic future.


“The Security Council welcomes the signing on 5 November 2001 of the UNMIK-FRY Common Document by the Special Representative of the Secretary-General and the Special Representative of the President of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and the Government of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and the Government of the Republic of Serbia.  This document is consistent with resolution 1244 (1999) and the Constitutional Framework for Provisional Self-Government in Kosovo.


“The Security Council reaffirms the statement of its President of 5 October 2001 (S/PRST/2001/27).  It encourages the further development of a constructive dialogue between the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) and the authorities of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.  It emphasizes the responsibility of the provisional institutions of self-government and all concerned to respect fully the final status provisions of resolution 1244 (1999). It underlines its continued commitment to the full implementation of resolution 1244 (1999), which remains the basis for building Kosovo’s future.”

Background


The Council last met to consider the situation in Kosovo, a province in the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, on 5 October when it heard a briefing from the Secretary-General's Special Representative in Kosovo, Hans Haekkerup (Denmark).  In a second meeting held that day, the Council, in a presidential statement, urged all men and women of the province to vote in the upcoming 17 November elections and called on Kosovo's leaders to publicly condemn violence and ethnic intolerance.


On 10 June 1999, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) suspended its air operations following the withdrawal of security forces of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia from Kosovo.  The Security Council, in its resolution 1244, then authorized the Secretary-General to establish the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) under which the people of the war-ravaged province could enjoy substantial autonomy.  That Mission was given authority over the territory and people of Kosovo, including all legislative and executive powers, as well as the administration of the judiciary. 


As chief of the Mission, the Secretary-General's Special Representative presides over four sectors involved in implementing civilian aspects of rehabilitating and reforming Kosovo, also known as the "four pillars".  They are:

-- Humanitarian assistance, led by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR);


-- Civil administration, under the United Nations itself;


-- Democratization and institution-building, led by the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE); and


-- Reconstruction and economic development, managed by the European Union.

The work of UNMIK was envisaged in five integrated phases:


Phase I:  The Mission would set up administrative structures, deploy international civilian police, provide emergency assistance for returning refugees and displaced people, restore public services, and train local police and judiciary.  It would also develop a phased economic recovery plan and seek to establish a self-sustaining economy;


Phase II:  The focus would be on administration of social services and utilities and consolidation of the rule of law.  Administration of such sectors as health and education would be transferred to local, and possibly regional, authorities.  Preparation for elections would begin;


Phase III:  UNMIK would finalize preparations and conduct elections for a Kosovo Transitional Authority;


Phase IV:  UNMIK would help Kosovo's elected representatives organize and set up provisional institutions for democratic and autonomous self-government and transfer its remaining administrative responsibilities, while supporting the consolidation of Kosovo's provisional institutions; and


Phase V:  The concluding phase would depend on a final settlement of the status of Kosovo.  The UNMIK would oversee the transfer of authority from Kosovo's provisional institutions to institutions established under a political settlement.


In the 18 months that have gone by since its formation, UNMIK has worked closely with Kosovo's leaders and citizens.  The first phase of civil registration was completed throughout the province in mid-July 2000, forming the basis of an electoral roll for municipal elections that were held successfully on 28 October.


On 6 November, the head of UNMIK signed an agreement with the Government of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia on the provision of security and other guarantees for the Serb minority in Kosovo ahead of elections in the predominantly ethnic Albanian province.


The UNMIK said in a statement it was "extremely pleased with the decision by both Serbian and Yugoslav Governments to endorse Kosovo Serb participation" in the 17 November elections.  According to the Mission, the Common Document reaffirms principles already contained in Security Council resolution 1244 and the Constitutional Framework regarding the rights of Kosovo Serbs and the obligations towards them.  "It reaffirms our commitments to improving conditions for Kosovo Serbs and other non-Albanians", UNMIK said.


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