12 November 1997


Press Release
GA/9354/Rev.1*



GENERAL ASSEMBLY ENDORSES SECRETARY-GENERAL'S REFORM ACTIONS

19971112
Commending the efforts and initiatives of the Secretary-General aimed at reforming the United Nations, the General Assembly in a meeting that extended into the evening, endorsed a set of actions described in his July report "Renewing the United Nations: a Programme for Reform", and called upon him to take full account of the views and comments expressed by Member States while considering his reform proposals.

The Secretary-General's July report included three types of measures, as follows: actions he could undertake on his own initiative, and which are already under implementation; actions requiring budgetary consideration, and which will now be considered by the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary); and recommendations which require the approval of Member States.

Adopting without a vote a resolution submitted by its President, Hennadiy Udovenko (Ukraine), the Assembly stressed that the actions would be implemented with full respect for the relevant mandates, decisions and Assembly resolutions, in particular the medium-term plan for the period 1998-2001. It affirmed that the programmatic implications of relevant actions would be considered in conjunction with related recommendations.

Among the actions endorsed was the establishment of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs, as a result of the consolidation of three departments in those fields. Actions requiring budgetary consideration include the establishment of a "development account", transferring savings derived from administrative efficiencies to programmes aimed at poverty alleviation and the generation of economic growth in developing countries. Recommendations to be considered by Member States include the creation of the post of Deputy Secretary-General.

Addressing the Assembly before action on the text, Secretary-General Kofi Annan said the resolution affirmed the partnership between the Assembly and the Secretariat. Together, they were renewing the United Nations for a


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* Revised to correct errors in the lead of the Press Release.

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new era and ensuring that it retained a central role in advancing the principles of the Charter and the interests of people everywhere. Mechanisms to focus the Assembly's deliberations and regularly update its agenda, coupled with the sunset provisions for new mandates, would enhance its responsiveness and dynamism.

The Assembly President, before introducing the draft, described the Secretary-General's proposals as far-reaching attempts to transform the Organization to carry out its mandates. The resolution was the result of a collective effort in which initiative, creativity and diplomatic skills, combined with a serious and constructive approach, had helped Members to build a solid foundation for the future. In dealing with that agenda item, the Assembly had exercised its responsibilities with pragmatism and respect for democratic procedures. Today marked an important milestone, he stressed, but there was still a long and arduous road ahead in the efforts to renew and revitalize the Organization.

Speaking before action on the resolution were the representatives of Algeria, Ecuador, Pakistan, Cuba, Papua New Guinea and Swaziland. Speaking after adoption of the text were the representatives of the United Republic of Tanzania (on behalf of the "Group of 77" developing countries), Luxembourg (on behalf of the European Union and associated States), Colombia, Egypt, Mexico, Norway, Canada (also on behalf of Australia and New Zealand), China, Syria, Indonesia, Japan, Israel, Republic of Korea, Brazil and Iran.

In other action this afternoon, the Assembly adopted a resolution on the work of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) by a recorded vote of 151 in favour to 1 against (Democratic People's Republic of Korea), with 5 abstentions (China, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Syria, Viet Nam) (Annex III). In a separate action, the Assembly approved the inclusion of the third preambular paragraph relating to the non-proliferation Treaty by a vote of 137 in favour, to 4 against (Democratic People's Republic of Korea, India, Israel, Pakistan,), with 1 abstention (Cuba) (Annex I). It approved the inclusion of the seventh operative paragraph, calling for Iraq to comply with relevant Security Council resolutions and its IAEA reporting requirements, by a vote of 114 in favour, to 2 against (Libya, Sudan) with 18 abstentions (Annex II).

Statements in explanation of vote were made by India, Iraq, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, China, Pakistan, Viet Nam, Russian Federation, Israel, Iran, Lebanon, Syria, Sudan, Nicaragua and Uganda.

The representatives of Azerbaijan, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Armenia and the Republic of Korea spoke in exercise of the right of reply.

The Assembly will resume its tenth emergency special session at 10 a.m. tomorrow, Thursday, 13 November, to consider the report of the Secretary- General on "Illegal Israeli actions in occupied East Jerusalem and the rest of the Occupied Palestinian Territory".


Assembly Work Programme

The General Assembly met this afternoon on the issue of "United Nations Reform: Measures and Proposals". It was to take action on a draft resolution (document A/52/L.17) entitled "Renewing the United Nations: a programme for reform", submitted by the Assembly President.

The Assembly also has before it a report of the Secretary-General (document A/51/950) with a series of additions, and two other related documents -- a statement by the Secretary-General to the open-ended informal consultations of the plenary on 4 November (document A/52/585) and a Note by the Secretariat (document A/52/84) containing responses to comments and queries from Member States during the open-ended informal consultations held on 21 and 28 October.

Also this afternoon, the Assembly was to continue consideration of the annual report of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and to take action on a related draft resolution. (For details, see Press Release GA/9353 of today's date.)

United Nations Reform: Measures and Proposals

The report of the Secretary-General proposes the establishment of a new Secretariat leadership and management structure; the consolidation of United Nations operations at the country level; and a thorough overhaul of human resources policies, practices and methods to bring financial solvency to the Organization. He also suggests ways to streamline the work of intergovernmental bodies, particularly the General Assembly and the Economic and Social Council. Further, his report advances "a new concept of Trusteeship" and proposes a "Millennium General Assembly" and a companion "People's Millennium Assembly" to deal with future challenges.

The proposals encompass the United Nations five core missions around which the Secretary-General has already restructured the Secretariat's substantive work programme -- peace and security; economic and social affairs; development cooperation; humanitarian affairs; and human rights. Key substantive issues include promotion of development as a central priority and the creation of a "dividend for development"; strengthening international efforts to combat crime, drugs and terrorism; extension of the Organization's human rights activities; advancement of the international disarmament agenda; and strengthening of the world community's response to humanitarian needs.

The Secretary-General's initiatives also address the structure and functioning of the Organization, particularly its ability to act as a whole. Their starting point, as they pertain to the United Nations Secretariat, is core institutional problems. (For a summary of the report, see Press Release SG/2037-ORG/1239 of 16 July 1997.)

In Addendum 1 (document A/51/950/Add.1), the Secretary-General proposes the establishment of the post of Deputy Secretary-General, who would have the following responsibilities: assist the Secretary-General in leading and


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managing Secretariat operations; act for the Secretary-General in his absence; support the Secretary-General in ensuring intersectoral and inter-institutional coherence of activities and programmes; assist the Secretary-General in heightening public awareness and increasing contact with the representatives of Member States; represent the Secretary-General at conferences, official functions, ceremonial and other occasions; undertake special assignments determined by the Secretary-General. Initially, the Deputy Secretary-General would have the task of overseeing the continuing United Nations reform effort and would also be responsible for the establishment of the Office of Development Financing and overseeing its activities.

In Addendum 2 (document A/51/950/Add.2), the Secretary-General proposes the rationalization of the subsidiary machinery of the Economic and Social Council. It outlines the consolidation of certain subsidiary bodies of the Council. The Committee on New and Renewable Sources of Energy and Energy for Development and the Committee on Natural Resources would be consolidated into the Commission on Sustainable Development. The Commission on Science and Technology for Development would become a subsidiary body of the Development Board of the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). The Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice and the Commission on Narcotic Drugs would be combined. The Intergovernmental Working Group of Experts on International Standards of Accounting and Reporting would report through the UNCTAD Commission on Investment, Technology, and related financial issues. The work of the Ad Hoc Group of Experts in International Tax Matters would be reviewed after completion of its mandate. The Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights would report to the Economic and Social Council through the Commission on Human Rights.

In Addendum 3 (document A/51/950/Add.3), the Secretary-General proposes the creation of a Department for Disarmament Affairs, which would provide a structure capable of carrying out mandates entrusted to the Organization by Member States.

In Addendum 4 (document A/51/950/Add.4), the Secretary-General proposes the establishment of a Revolving Credit Fund, initially capitalized at a level of up to $1 billion through voluntary contributions or other means of financing. The Secretary-General would use the Fund to finance newly arising overdue assessment payments of Member States.

In Addendum 5 (document A/51/950/Add.5), the Secretary-General proposes the establishment of a development account. He has stated that up to 38 per cent of regular budget resources are devoted to non-programme costs defined as "administrative and information". He is committed to reducing these costs under the regular budget by about one third and to turn the savings into a "dividend for development". The Secretary-General would recommend to the Assembly the level of resources to be allocated to the development account, and this figure would be based on proposed reductions in non-programme costs.

In Addendum 6 (document A/51/950/Add.6), the Secretariat explains the basic concepts of results-based budgeting and how these might be applied to the United Nations. The key identifying feature of results-based budgeting is


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that the emphasis is on the outputs to be produced (reports, studies, conferences, etc.) and consequent outcomes, as opposed to input budgeting, where the defining feature is an emphasis is on the inputs (staff, materials, equipment, etc.). The financial management focus in results-based budgeting would be in controlling the overall (as opposed to individual) expenditures and ensuring that outputs are delivered within the agreed budget. Results- based budgets focus more on results to be achieved and less on how the money is to be spent within the overall allocation. They contain information on the costs, quantity, and quality of outputs to be produced.

By the terms of the draft resolution (document A/52/L.17), the Assembly would decide to continue with the consideration of the Secretary-General's report "Renewing the United Nations: a programme for reform". It would request the Secretary-General to present a report on the implementation of the actions described in his report to the fifty-third session. It would call upon him, while implementing the actions described in his report, to take account of the views and comments expressed by Member States and groups of Member States. It would stress that the actions will be implemented with full respect for the relevant mandates, decisions and resolution of the General Assembly, including the Medium-Term Plan for the period 1998-2001.

IAEA: Statements SERGEI KOLOS (Belarus) said IAEA efforts to promote nuclear-weapon-free zones were highly commendable and should inspire the countries of the northern hemisphere to take similar steps. The Belarus initiative aimed at establishing such a zone in the European region was particularly important. Its realization would strengthen the non-proliferation regime and European and international security, as well as confidence-building among States without prejudice to stability on the continent. The major part of a State system of accounting and control for nuclear materials had been established in Belarus with the help of the IAEA, Japan, Sweden and the United States. He reiterated his Government's proposal to establish a regional training centre on controls and physical protection of nuclear materials.

Illicit trafficking in nuclear materials which might pose a serious security threat and the Agency's efforts to prevent it were commendable, he said. The Russian Federation proposal regarding a Convention to combat acts of nuclear terrorism, being discussed in the Sixth Committee (Legal), deserved a positive response. The report had confirmed the dramatic increase in cases of thyroid cancer among children and other serious economic and social consequences as a result of the Chernobyl catastrophe. The effects were a long-term problem which could be dealt with only by concerted international action. His Government was seriously concerned that, in the current discussions on closing the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, the solution to medical and environmental problems were being pushed aside. His President had proposed a fund which would accumulate part of the profits of nuclear power corporations to eliminate the consequences of nuclear disasters and implement important environmental programmes.


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MAJID TAKHT-RAVANCHI (Iran) said the initiative aimed at making the sensitive region of Central Asia a zone free from nuclear weapons was commendable. However, despite the long-standing support of the IAEA, a nuclear-weapon-free zone was yet to be established in the Middle East because of the refusal of Israel, with the support of certain nuclear Powers, to join the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and to place its unsafeguarded nuclear weapons facilities under IAEA safeguards. Iran had always pursued an open and transparent policy in its peaceful nuclear activities and would continue to support the strengthening of comprehensive, non-discriminatory and balanced non-proliferation principles.

He believed that the additional protocol, adopted last June by the IAEA Board of Governors, should be applied equally to nuclear facilities of all States, in particular, those possessing nuclear weapons. The universality of the new safeguards system was the only way to ensure the compliance of all States with nuclear non-proliferation principles envisaged in the NPT and the statute of the IAEA. Iran was convinced that the additional protocol should not compromise the inalienable rights of the NPT parties to peaceful uses of nuclear materials and technology. With the new strengthened safeguard system in place, there were no justifications for existing discriminatory restrictions and regimes on the transfer of nuclear materials and technology for peaceful purposes.

He said certain regions did not enjoy adequate representation in the main decision-making body of the IAEA. That issue should not be linked to other issues such as the composition of certain geographical groupings.

AKMARAL ARYSTANBEKOVA (Kazakhstan) said that upon independence, her country, which had inherited an arsenal of weapons from the Soviet Union, stated its support for nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation. President Nazarbaev had shut down the Semipalatinsk nuclear-test site, and Kazakhstan acceded to the NPT as a non-nuclear-weapon State. Kazakhstan supported the Agency's efforts to strengthen guarantees, signing a Safeguards Agreement in 1995. It welcomed the Agency's measures to prevent nuclear trafficking, and was preparing reports for the Agency on its cooperation in that regard. Legislation complied with Agency guidelines on the export of nuclear materials. Kazakhstan was carrying out the procedures that would enable it to ratify the Convention on Nuclear Safety signed last year.

Kazakhstan endorsed a regional Agency project for the safe handling of radioactive waste and hoped cooperation on projects concerning the use of nuclear and isotope methods in several areas would be expanded, she said. It was cooperating with the Agency on converting the former Semipalatinsk test site, where radiation doses remained high. The International Conference on Problems of Nuclear Weapons Non-Proliferation was held in Kazakhstan.

JEAN-PHILIP DU PREEZ (South Africa) said his Government hoped the Model Protocol signed in 1997 would form the basis of stronger safeguards agreements between the Agency and all its members. His Government supported the Agency's efforts to resolve the safeguards issue in Iraq and the Democratic People's


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Republic of Korea, and called on those States to cooperate fully in the Agency's inspections.

The Agency was basically in good shape, but there were several areas that needed improvement, as well as some worrying signs, he said. Foremost among them were technical cooperation activities, an area of particular significance for developing countries. It would be tragic if the Agency's technical cooperation programme suffered from a lack of resources. All Agency members must ensure that vital function was maintained at an appropriate level and continued to develop.

VLADIMIR SOTIROV (Bulgaria) said that while primary responsibility for the problems related to illicit nuclear trafficking lay with Member States, his country recognized the growing importance of international cooperation between them. The role of the IAEA was also important in supplementing the actions of governments and in providing coordination of measures to assist them in areas such as training, physical protection of nuclear material and exchange of information.

He said Bulgaria was among the countries using nuclear energy to generate electricity. In the exploitation of nuclear power reactors, great attention was paid to ensuring nuclear safety and radiation protection. The IAEA had provided assistance in achieving those objectives by training Bulgarian inspectors in interregional and regional training courses and seminars, as well as by providing direct assistance through technical cooperation projects.

VLADIMIR GALUSKA (Czech Republic) said the mission and the tasks of the IAEA in ensuring global security in respect to the NPT remained the top priority in current and future actions of the Agency. His country welcomed the adoption of the model text of the Protocol Additional to the Safeguards Agreements. It increased the inspection mandate of the IAEA, and the Czech Republic had initiated steps to accede to it. His country commended the efforts of the IAEA and its member States in the preparation and adoption of the Protocol to Amend the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage, the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage, and the Joint Convention on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management and on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management. All of them brought safety standards to areas not previously covered, and his country was prepared to incorporate them in its legislation upon their signature, adoption and entry into force.

He said the IAEA technical cooperation programmes, implemented at both regional and national levels, were of particular, social and economic assistance for their beneficiaries. His country had stressed many times that it did not feel the urgent need for changes in size and composition of the IAEA Board of Governors. In the course of discussion, however, it had decided to accept a package solution proposed by Canada. The Czech Republic could not go along with any solution leading to other than equal representation of all geographic areas, in accordance with recent developments in the membership of the IAEA, particularly in Europe.


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KAROL MISTRIK (Slovakia) said his country supported the aims of the States signatories which were interested in effective cooperation between the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) and the IAEA. It hoped the location of both organizations in Vienna would help to improve verification activities in the field of non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. His country appealed to all countries that had not signed the Agreement on Safeguards with the IAEA in compliance with article III of the NPT to meet their commitments according to the Treaty.

He said Slovakia noted the problems in the safeguards implementation by the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, particularly in verifying the initial declaration, and appealed to that country to cooperate with the IAEA to finalize the process of verification of the initial declaration as soon as possible.

Slovakia supported the IAEA "Programme 93+2" which represented the utilization of modern advanced verification techniques for better confidence- building in future. He said he was convinced the programme would become a reliable instrument for the control of peaceful nuclear energy. His country had ratified the Convention of Nuclear Safety and welcomed the adoption of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management, the Convention of Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage and the Protocol to Amend the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear damage. Nuclear energy played an important role in the Slovak economy, and in 1996 nuclear power plants generated almost half of the country's total electricity. An independent Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Slovakia assured State supervision over nuclear safety.

YURIY BOHAIEVS'KY (Ukraine) said the agreement between his Government and the IAEA for the application of safeguards to all nuclear materials in all peaceful nuclear activities of Ukraine was being fulfilled. His Government supported the Agency's initiatives regarding application of nuclear weapons non-proliferation safeguards. It also decided this year to join the Agency's database on the trafficking of nuclear materials and the sources of iodizing radiation. Nuclear and radiation safety were of special importance for Ukraine, which was pleased with the IAEA's role in evaluating the safety of nuclear power plants in central and eastern Europe.

The Chernobyl power plant was still a matter of concern, he said. Ukraine had a severe electric power crisis, and it was not easy to shut down Unit 1 in 1996. The plant would be entirely decommissioned by 2000. According to an understanding between the G-7 industrialized countries, the European Commission and Ukraine that was signed in Ottawa, the precondition for shutting down Unit 1 was construction of compensation power units. However, international financial institutions still had not solved the problem of funding support, which might result in revising earlier decisions on decommissioning the plant.

He said current activities seeking the necessary resources to finance the project were "not intensive enough" and "unreasonably blocked". The Government of Ukraine welcomed the United States Government's initiative on


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the "Sarcophagus" project, which was supported by other G-7 countries and Ukraine, and welcomed the adoption at the IAEA General Conference of the resolution entitled "International Initiative for the Chernobyl Sarcophagus", calling on States to contribute to a project that would enhance the reactor's safety.

ESTHER M. TOLLE (Kenya, said that, in the past year, the IAEA's performance in developing applications of nuclear technology for sustainable development were commendable, making it possible for Member States to derive maximum benefits from the peaceful uses of nuclear energy through the Technical Cooperation Programme. The success of the Model Project had invigorated the Programme, resulting in new initiatives for country programmes and thematic planning, co-funding, the uses of targets and success criteria. Such an approach was likely to produce a tangible social and economic impact, that responded to national needs through direct contribution of nuclear energy to cost-effective, sustainable development priorities.

She said the Agency's programme to promote technical cooperation among developing countries aimed at promoting regional cooperative initiatives as a way to accelerate technology transfers was commendable. Such endeavours would ultimately ensure optimum use of available scarce resources and lead to the positive impact of science and technology among partner countries. His Government was grateful to the IAEA Director-General and his staff for their contribution to the success of the Technical Cooperation Programme in Kenya. Benefits included training and fellowships, technology, animal and human health, agriculture and nuclear safety.

He said negotiations should begin for a convention to prohibit the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons and other nuclear devices. Negotiations to eliminate nuclear weapons should be the highest priority to complement disarmament achievements so far.

PEDRO NUEZ MOSQUERA (Cuba) said his country had benefited from its cooperation with the IAEA in several areas and believed that the IAEA's activities should be maintained and strengthened. Unfortunately, there were forces that tried to manipulate international agencies for petty national interests. On 30 July, a note by Cuba to the IAEA was circulated that detailed actions taken by the United States to boycott the Cuban nuclear programme and, in particular, cooperation between the IAEA and Cuba. The United States legislation, known as the Helms-Burton Act, devoted a whole section to Cuba's nuclear programme. Further action on the issue was being considered in the United States Congress. His Government categorically rejected such action. He said Cuba was proud to have been the venue for a meeting of countries that were part of a regional cooperative arrangement in the Caribbean and Latin American region. The IAEA had contributed to the success of the conference. He supported the IAEA safeguards arrangements, while reiterating that safeguards activities should not become an unacceptable financial burden to developing countries. Since it was an important Agency, the IAEA resolution should only be adopted on the basis of the most solid consensus.


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ANDR ERDS (Hungary) said the international community should continue to assert its unwavering support for measures that would further cement the ability of the Agency to enlarge the scope of its safety agreements. He endorsed the measures designed to enhance the safe transport of radioactive materials and to combat their illicit trafficking. His country continued to rely on energy generated by nuclear power plants. Consequently, it was committed to participating in the Agency's cooperation and education programmes, adopting the latest safety standards and contributing to the prevention of any form of misappropriation of nuclear technologies.

He was concerned that the relevant Security Council resolutions regarding Iraq had not clarified all remaining doubts associated with that programme, he said. He called on Iraqi authorities to cooperate with the Agency and the mandated international bodies and to furnish them with the information requested, in full compliance with the Council resolutions. Also, repeated requests made by the Council urging the Democratic People's Republic of Korea to cooperate fully with the Agency had gone unheeded.

In conclusion, he said the nuclear disaster at Chernobyl had sent the strongest possible message about the urgency of improving nuclear safety and security. He looked forward to the upcoming international meetings to be held in New York aimed at mobilizing and coordinating the efforts by the international community in that respect.

Explanations of Vote

P.V. KUMAR (India) said he would call for vote on preambular paragraph 3 and would vote against it; the language in that paragraph suggested a link between adherence to the NPT and freedom to develop research, production and use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. By inferring that adherence to the NPT had a bearing on access to peaceful uses of atomic energy, the draft deviated from the objectives enshrined in the Agency's statute, which forbade discrimination on any basis whatsoever.

SAEED H. HASAN (Iraq) said exploitation of the IAEA item for political purposes undermined the impartiality of the Agency, and was an attempt to exploit a starving people and continue the embargo against Iraq. An attempt to circumvent the mandate of the Agency was in contradiction to the findings of the IAEA annual report. Operative paragraph 7 of the resolution was the best example of attempts to circumvent the IAEA mandate; it contained a false evaluation of the Iraq's implementation of its obligations. The nuclear issue was closed for Iraq. Reading sections of the IAEA's annual report, he said there were no indications that Iraq had produced more than a few grams of weapons-usable nuclear material, and all of which had been removed from the country. There was no indication that Iraq had any capability of producing weapons-usable materials.

The IAEA report stated that implementation of the verification plan had not resulted in indications of proscribed acts or the presence of proscribed materials. Paragraph 83 of the report stated that IAEA activities concerning Iraq's clandestine nuclear programme had reached the point of diminishing


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returns. The Director-General of the IAEA said a technically coherent picture had been made of Iraq's nuclear programme and that the full, final, complete declaration had not shown substantial inconsistencies between the two. The Agency's efforts in Iraq and the completion of its task there would not have been possible without the full cooperation of Iraq. Paragraph 7 was, therefore, misplaced and Iraq requested a separate vote on it.

KIM CHANG GUK (Democratic People's Republic of Korea) said his Government had an unambiguous position on the draft resolution which contained stereotype paragraphs regarding the real position on the Korean peninsula. It was well known that since the signing by the Democratic People's Republic of Korea of an agreed framework with the United States, his Government had frozen its key nuclear facilities, permitted the IAEA monitoring activities on the frozen facilities and provided the necessary conditions for them to carry out irregular inspections. As long as the frozen key nuclear facilities were under IAEA regular and irregular inspections, the information on past nuclear activities would be fully preserved.

Notwithstanding, IAEA officials were unreasonably raising issues, which were supposed to be dealt with in the next stage of completion of a significant portion of the light water reactor project under United States leadership. That was an attempt to draw back the nuclear issue of the Korean peninsula into the initial stage by drawing artificial obstacles to the implementation of the framework agreement by the United States and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

Regrettably, a number of States took side with the IAEA officials in urging his country to follow the unfair demand of the IAEA officials, he said. The agreed framework clearly specified the provisions concerning the replacement of the graphite moderator system with a light water reactor system and normalization of political and economic relations between the United States and his country. It had been welcomed by the Security Council as the only way to deal with the nuclear issue on the Korean peninsula. The agreement was based not on confidence, but on the principle of simultaneous actions by both countries. The nuclear issue of the Korean peninsula was a political and military issue between his Government and the United States, and was being resolved not by the IAEA, but by the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and the United States. How could his country accept full inspection when the agreed framework had not been fully implemented? If the international community was concerned over the situation, it should take an impartial stance. The world had witnessed that pressure would not "go down" with his Government. He would vote against the draft resolution.

Action on IAEA Draft

The Assembly voted on the inclusion of the third preambular paragraph of the draft, adopting it by a recorded vote of 137 in favour to 4 against (Democratic People's Republic of Korea, India, Israel, Pakistan) with 1 abstention (Cuba). (See Annex I.)


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The Assembly then held a separate vote on the seventh operative paragraph of the draft. It was adopted by a vote of 114 in favour to 2 against (Libya, Sudan), with 18 abstentions. (See Annex II.)

Following that action, the Assembly took action on the draft resolution on the IAEA as a whole. It adopted the resolution by a vote of 151 in favour to 1 against (Democratic People's Republic of Korea), with 5 abstentions (China, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Syria, Viet Nam). (See Annex III.)

Explanations of Vote

WU HAITAO (China) said the IAEA had made many positive contributions to ensure the safe use of nuclear energy. He agreed with most of the elements in the draft resolution, but he had reservations on the paragraph about the decision of the Board of Governors of the General Conference of the IAEA, and China had abstained in the vote.

ABDUL WAHAB (Pakistan) said that his vote in favour of the draft as a whole did not constitute endorsement of the operative paragraph concerning the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. Pakistan recognized the vital importance of the management of radioactive waste in a safe and effective manner and participated in the Group of Experts, established with the specific mandate to draft a Convention on Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. The Expert Group was not mandated to draft an international convention. Pakistan also had other reservations and, because of this, it did not support the adoption of the Joint Convention. PHAM QUANG VINH (Viet Nam) said the IAEA had made major contributions to ensure nuclear safety. He expressed high appreciation to the Agency for its assistance to developing countries to ensure safe uses of nuclear energy. He agreed with the draft as a whole, but, due to certain reservations, abstained on the vote.

ALEKSANDR GORELIK (Russian Federation) said that, while supporting the resolution as a whole, he abstained on the vote on paragraph 7. He thought the present wording of certain parts contained contradictions, for which there was no ground. He also underscored that Iraq should comply fully with the relevant Security Council resolutions.

Mr. ASCULAI (Israel) voted in favour of the resolution as a whole, but said he voted against preambular paragraph 3, because Israel believed that its formulation was discriminatory. Its application should be to all States, regardless of whether they were signatories to the NPT. That discrimination was contradictory to the IAEA Charter.

GHOLAMHOSSEIN DEHGHANI (Iran) said the only way to ensure the success of a new safeguards system was to ensure its universality. He was convinced that the additional protocol should not prohibit signatories to the NPT from using nuclear energy for safe purposes.


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HICHAM HAMDAN (Lebanon) said he thought preambular paragraph 14 was too ambiguous, its objective being to serve the interest of certain Member States such as Israel. He believed Israel should join the NPT and subject itself to international inspection.

KHALIL ABOU-HADID (Syria) abstained on the vote of the resolution as a whole, because of Israel's non-accession to the NPT. He said it was impossible to establish a nuclear-free zone in the Middle East despite IAEA's efforts. Israel's present position posed a danger to the area, and he hoped the Agency could convince Israel to accede to the NPT.

ALI OSMAN (Sudan) supported the draft resolution and joined the international consensus on it. However, it expressed reservations about operative paragraph 7, which was selective in nature.

ENRIQUE PAGUAGA FERNANDEZ (Nicaragua) said his delegation was absent during the voting and wished to put on record its affirmative vote on the resolution as a whole, as well as on paragraphs 3 and 7.

PAUL C. MUKASA-SSALI (Uganda) said his delegation was absent during the voting and wished to put on record its vote in favour of the resolution as a whole, as well as on paragraphs 3 and 7.

Rights of Reply

YASHAR TEIMUR ALIYEV (Azerbaijan) said Armenia occupied 20 per cent of its territory and continued its effort to misinform the international community by claiming Azerbaijan was carrying out a blockade. Part of Azerbaijan was cut off by Armenia from the rest of the country. Azerbaijan was not obliged to provide its aggressor neighbour with energy so that it could continue its expansionist plans.

HONG JE RYONG (Democratic People's Republic of Korea) said the nuclear issue on the Korean peninsula stemmed from the policies of the United States, which had introduced nuclear weapons into the Republic of Korea and threatened nuclear attack against his country. The United States was trying to create a bad image of the Democratic People's Republic by claiming it would not continue to implement the agreed framework. His country was doing more than it was obliged to do under the safeguards agreement. Resolution of the issue was based on how the United States implemented its part of the agreement. The Democratic People's Republic could not agree to inspection when the United States had not implemented its part of the agreement. The Republic of Korea Government were "traitors who had brought nuclear weapons onto the peninsula" and were under the protection of a foreign nuclear umbrella. The Republic of Korea had no right to say what it did, when it talked about the nuclear issue of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. They had no credibility or sincerity.

MOVSES ABELIAN (Armenia), in reply to Azerbaijan, said the United Nations was not the appropriate forum to discuss the situation in Nagorny- Karabakh.


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YUNG WOO CHUN (Republic of Korea) regretted the lack of restraint in the language used by his colleague from the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. Pyongyang's claim that it was not bound by IAEA safeguards but by the agreed framework with the United States did not make sense. The Democratic People's Republic was under legal obligation to comply with safeguards agreement. The framework agreement could contribute to resolution of Korean nuclear issue, but bilateral arrangements were intended to supplement, not replace, the global NPT regime.

Mr. HONG (Democratic People's Republic of Korea) said there was no credibility in the statement by the Republic of Korea; the situation was manipulated by the United States.

Mr. CHUN (Republic of Korea) said the non-compliance of the Democratic People's Republic was well-documented. The issue would remain unresolved as long as that stalling continued. There was no substitute for cooperation with IAEA safeguards.

Statements: United Nations Reform The President of the General Assembly, HENNADIY UDOVENKO (Ukraine), said the Secretary-General's report had been recognized as a far-reaching attempt to transform the Organization into an institution better prepared in the next century to carry out the mandates emanating from the Charter and from the legislative intergovernmental machinery. It commanded broad support among the heads of State and government at the general debate, and that support had been reiterated since then in a number of other forums within and outside the United Nations.

The Assembly had broken new ground in dealing with the agenda item, he continued. It had adopted the format of open-ended informal consultations of the plenary and had exercised its responsibilities with pragmatism and respect for democratic procedures. During the 12 meetings held in the informal format, there were almost 200 statements and interventions from delegations, spanning the broad spectrum of the Assembly's membership.

He said the consultations also generated fruitful dialogue with the Secretary-General and his representatives, which helped to clarify and elaborate issues on which questions were raised and suggestions put forward. As a result, six addenda to the report had been issued, and the Secretary- General's statement at the informal consultations, as well as Secretariat responses to queries, had now been released as official documents. The draft resolution before the Assembly (document A/52/L.13) was the result of a collective effort. Initiative, creativity and the diplomatic skills of individual delegations and delegates, combined with a serious and constructive approach adopted by groups of States, had helped Members to build a solid foundation for future progress.

He said another key factor in the success of the enterprise was the support and active involvement of several groups of States, among them the European Union, the "Group of 77" developing countries and the Non-Aligned


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Movement. Progress towards building a consensus, in part through compromise, was made, and the naysayers who often chose to see the Assembly's diversity as a detriment, rather than the valuable asset, were proven wrong. There was a tendency to overlook the fact that the General Assembly was the most representative organ of the United Nations. No less important, the Assembly was a democratic institution, in which each Member had a say and a vote. Even though today marked the passing of an important milestone, there was still a rather long and arduous road ahead in the joint efforts to renew and revitalize the United Nations. Secretary-General KOFI ANNAN said that today was an important moment for the United Nations. The draft resolution affirmed that he was working in partnership with the Assembly for the "quiet revolution" he had announced on 16 July. The United Nations was being transformed, renewed for a new era and retaining a central role in advancing the principles of the Charter and the interests of people everywhere. The world needed a revitalized United Nations. The debate by Member States in recent weeks had been useful and constructive in facilitating the adoption of a consensus resolution. He welcomed suggestions concerning the implementation of his programme of action and would take them fully into account.

Actions that resided in his jurisdiction were one component of the overall reform package, the Secretary-General said, adding "we must now move forward expeditiously with the rest". The position of Deputy Secretary- General was an essential element of his proposed revamping of the Secretariat's leadership and management structure. So, too, were the staffing and funding proposals that rounded out his restructuring efforts. The Development Dividend and multi-year funding for operational activities reinforced the Organization's commitment to the core objective of development.

The proposed ministerial commission on the specialized agencies would enable the United Nations to achieve greater system-wide coherence and impact in meeting new challenges, he continued. The Millennium Assembly, to which the ministerial commission would report, together with the Millennium People's Assembly, would afford the entire international community the opportunity to articulate a strategy of multilateral cooperation of the century ahead.

A new results based budgeting system was essential to move the Organization beyond the constraints and rigidities of micromanagement, the Secretary-General said. It would provide Member States with accountability, while giving the Secretariat the flexibility to achieve its mandates in the most cost-effective manner. Mechanisms to focus the Assembly's deliberations and to regularly update its agenda, coupled with the sunset provisions for new mandates, would enhance the responsiveness of the Assembly as the Organization's highest and most representative legislative body.

Other recommendations, he said, addressed the severe cash flow problem and proposed institutional refinements to strengthen performance in the areas of disarmament, humanitarian affairs, political affairs, peacekeeping, public information, and the rationalization of the Economic and Social Council's


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subsidiary machinery. (For text of the Secretary General's statement, see Press Release SG/SM/6391 of 12 November.)

The Assembly PRESIDENT then introduced the draft resolution.

Statements before Vote

ABDALLAH BAALI (Algeria) said his delegation had actively participated in the informal open-ended negotiations and was ready to join in the consensus on the draft. It was important to fully respect the Assembly's rules of procedure, including rule 53 and the financial rules of the Organization. The synergy between the Secretary-General and the Assembly was the best image to show to the world, and also to meet the challenges of the next millennium.

LUIS VALENCIA RODRIGUEZ (Ecuador) said he fully supported the draft resolution. Certain aspects needed to be highlighted, including: references to the purposes and principles of the Charter; respect for the rules governing the Assembly's role and the financial and administrative forms which must be complied with; authorization for the Secretary-General to implement his reform proposals, taking into account the views of Member States; the need to respect the medium term plan for 1988-1999; and the recognition of the Secretary- General's authority. That recognition should be reflected in the trust placed in him. He urged that the draft be adopted without a vote.

AHMAD KAMAL (Pakistan) said reform was never easy, partly because it required change and partly because reform was not always of equal and mutual benefit to all. There was always the temptation to demean it as a conditionality for the fulfilment of contractual obligations, which had not always been met with the same commitment as exercise on reform itself. Reform had to strengthen the Organization's capacity to deliver on the promise of the Charter. The goal was greater democratization and a restoration of the primacy of its development role.

He said reform efforts must be carried out strictly within the overall framework of the mandates provided by Member States. They should determine and ensure the strategic coherence and direction of the Organization's work. The reason for so much difficulty in the informal negotiations was because several of the proposals described as "actions" in the Secretary-General's report implied changes in mandates, or an extension of the Secretary-General's powers.

He was particularly concerned with the proposals on disarmament, which was a complex and sensitive issue. The Secretary-General had responded to the persistent reasoning by Member States and modified his original proposal contained in Action 6. The reference to "arms regulations" had been dropped and the programmatic aspects of the Department of Disarmament Affairs would be considered in conjunction with the related recommendation. The financial aspects and matters pertaining to upgrading would be considered by the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary). It was understood that the examination would be done with full regard for the overall emphasis on personnel reduction in the Organization.


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BRUNO RODRIGUEZ PARRILLA (Cuba) said his country supported reform aimed at making the United Nations democratic and re-establishing the Charter provisions that were ignored in a unipolar era. The sovereign equality of States must be upheld and the Security Council veto abolished. The United Nations must serve all Member States, not just a small group. The Security Council frequently limited the General Assembly's authority. Development and human rights for all must be a priority. Reform must avoid harmful political manipulation and draw a distinction between small countries that could not pay their assessments and rich countries that chose not to pay them for political reasons.

Cuba joined the consensus on the draft resolution, he said. It was not the best resolution. Some of the actions proposed were hasty. Some of them had not taken into account resolutions of the General Assembly. Some of them asked too much of the Assembly. The Group of 77 and China and the Non-aligned Movement had submitted proposals that were not taken into account. The General Assembly should not be meeting without the presence of the Fifth Committee; and Cuba opposed any attempt to restrict the authority of the Committee. Cuba trusted that its suggestions would be sent to the Secretary- General, and that he would take them into account.

JIMMY OVIA (Papua New Guinea) said the draft resolution called for wide- ranging changes and was an important and well-crafted document, although it was not as exhaustive as hoped and was vague in some parts. However, it reaffirmed the political message being sent to the international community. Hopefully, there would be no ambiguities for the Secretariat in implementing the resolution. He regarded the adoption of the text as the beginning of a process and not an end in itself. He hoped some recommendations, particularly as they applied to certain regions, would be subject to further discussion. The reform proposals had made human rights a cross-sectoral issue. He said he wondered about the future of such issues as the environment and sustainable development.

MOSES MATHENDEK DLAMINI (Swaziland) said he had been under the impression that when the Assembly convened informal open-ended negotiations, it was paving a way for Member States to debate the reform proposals. He was disappointed that hardly a day had been spent to consider the Secretary- General's report which was going to affect all Member States. Reform should be guided by the principles of the Charter. He hoped reform would make the Member States feel proud. He also hoped non-governmental organizations would remain answerable to the Economic and Social Council.

The Assembly then adopted the draft resolution on "Renewing the United Nations: a programme for reform", without a vote.

Explanations of Vote

DAUDI MWAKAWAGO (United Republic of Tanzania), speaking on behalf of the Group of 77 and China, said the Group had decided to join the consensus in order to facilitate the reform process, even though it did not fully reflect all of their concerns as expressed during the negotiations. They were


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encouraged that the resolution contained useful in-built elements which could cover some of their concerns when measures were implemented, such as operative paragraph 2, which called on the Secretary-General to take into account the views and comments expressed by Member States and groups of Member States. Importance should also be attached to the articles of the resolution stressing the fact that the implementation of the reform measures should be in accordance with purposes of the Charter, and respect fully the relevant mandates, decisions and resolutions of the Assembly, including, in particular, the Medium-term Plan for the period 1998-2001.

JEAN-LOUIS WOLZFELD (Luxembourg) spoke on behalf of the European Union and said that Bulgaria, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia and the associated country, Cyprus, as well as Iceland and Liechtenstein, aligned themselves with his statement.

He said they approved the reform undertaken by the Secretary-General and supported the action. They wanted to draw the Secretary-General's attention to many comments made during the fruitful discussions. He might want to take those comments into account when implementing the measures contained in his programme. The comments the European Union made on the actions in the reform programme will be transmitted to the Secretary-General according to operative paragraph 2 of the resolution. Then the recommendations in his programme will be examined.

JULIO LONDOO PAREDES (Colombia), speaking on behalf of the countries of the Non-Aligned Movement, said those countries had participated actively in the numerous informal consultations during the past few weeks. They had acted in an open and positive manner to improve the work of the Organization. In support of the draft, the Movement wanted to thank all those involved in that process, and was prepared to continue the work before the Assembly.

SOLIMAN AWAAD (Egypt) associated himself with the position of the Group of 77 and the Non-Aligned Movement. He hoped the adoption of the resolution would be an affirmation of the commitment of Member States to enhancement of the Organization. He shared the understanding expressed by the Secretary- General in his address to the informal consultation on 4 November. He looked forward to continued consideration of that issue.

GUSTAVO ALBIN (Mexico) said his delegation had actively participated in the process leading up to the adoption of the resolution. He reaffirmed Mexico's commitment to the United Nations reform process and appreciated the efforts of all those involved. The resolution would help strengthen the capacity of the Secretariat, which would benefit the Organization as a whole. It was up to the Member States now to consider the financial and programmatic implications of the resolution.

JAKKEN BIORN LIAN (Norway) said the reform initiatives would strengthen the United Nations ability to fulfil the Charter and Member States' aspirations and needs. They were in the interests of the membership as a whole, and not only of a few. Many delegations participated in the informal consultations that resulted in adoption of the resolution. They raised


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questions and made comments on the proposed actions. Dialogue cleared the doubts some delegations had at the outset. If some still lingered, it was important that the Secretary-General said he would take account of Member States' views and comments.

ROBERT R. FOWLER (Canada), speaking for Australia, New Zealand and Canada, said the resolution sent a powerful message to the world that the United Nations Member States fully supported the Secretary-General's reform process. It was a clear endorsement of the actions contained in his report, and signalled confidence in him and in the ability of the United Nations to adapt to and meet the membership's collective needs in the next millennium.

The countries for which he spoke urged all Member States to adopt a constructive approach to the reform challenge. That would send a signal to the world that the United Nations was strong, stable and here to stay.

QIN HUASUN (China) said the resolution was the first step towards reform. China was in favour of reforming the United Nations, but the measures must reflect the interests of all Member States and the results must stand the test of time. Reform must "allow full play to democracy, heed the voices of all sides and take into account the interests of various parties". The practice of settling problems after clarification must be continued. Reform should conform to the membership's demands and focus on strengthening the Organization's role in economic and social development.

The resolution should not prejudge recommendations and the final decision. The financial and programmatic implications of the relevant actions should be considered by the relevant bodies. Deciding on a question with financial implications without submitting it to the relevant committee first should be an exceptional case. Reasonable concerns raised by many Member States should be recognized. China hoped consultations between the Secretary- General and Member States and between Member States themselves would continue.

MIKHAIL WEHBE (Syria) said his Government attached great importance to the reform efforts, which should help fulfil people's hopes for the United Nations as an instrument to secure peace, security and sustainable development. It was important to take into account various statements and clarifications of the report made during the open-ended informal consultations. Syria fully supported views of representatives of both the Non-aligned Movement and the Group of 77 and China, because they were accurate and objective and because they represented the views of 134 Member States.

He outlined his views on the particular aspects of the reform package. He said the nuclear States should negotiate on weapons of mass destruction and, it was also important that, in revamping United Nations disarmament mechanisms, the Disarmament Commission should not be compromised. On other actions, he said Syria supported the position of the Non-Aligned Movement on human rights, which should be dealt with as a separate question, since integration would further politicize the subject. Due regard should be given to the medium-term plan for 1998-2001, as the best means to implement the


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actions. Any efforts that affected the goal of sustainable development, particularly in the least developed countries, should be ruled out.

MALIKUS SUAMIN (Indonesia) said his delegation associated itself with the statement made by the United Republic of Tanzania, on behalf of the Group of 77 and China, as well as with that made by Colombia, on behalf of the Non- Aligned countries. The resolution was imperfect and did not satisfy all delegations, but reflected most of the Member States' concerns. It sent a signal to the international community on commitment to reform, and Indonesia supported it.

It was imperative for the Secretary-General to take all views into account, especially those of the Group of 77 and the Non-Aligned Movement. The Secretary-General's report to the fifty-third session of the General Assembly must reflect the concerns of Member States. Close partnership between the Secretariat and the Member States was necessary to provide them with additional clarification on the proposals, in respond to comments and questions from various delegations.

YUKIO TAKASU (Japan) said the adoption by consensus of the draft resolution was an important milestone in the reform process. Member States had reaffirmed their commitment to improve the effectiveness of the United Nations in all its aspects. He expressed appreciation to all those who endeavoured to reach that stage. While pushing forward with initiatives, he expressed support for the Secretary-General's initiatives as long as they complied with guidelines. The Secretary-General would take into account views of all Member States in implementing the resolution. Although the draft was important, it was only one stage. Now, the Assembly must move speedily to the next stage, the implementation mentioned in the Secretary-General's report, so that it could proceed with its work.

DAVID PELEG (Israel) said the reform proposals were of paramount importance, and the programme outlined by the Secretary-General was sound and moved in the right direction. Nevertheless, Israel could not but view with increasing consternation a United Nations which proclaimed its universality on a constant basis, and yet by virtue of a system of regional groups (not contemplated by the founders of the Organization and nowhere codified in any official rules of procedure) continued to systematically exclude Israel from any meaningful role in the Organization. Israel could not be accepted into the Asian Group because it was excluded from election in most United Nations bodies.

Great weight was given to the regional groups in which Israel could not participate. The clear preference for taking statements by groups of States spoke for itself and violated the principles of the Charter. The injustice occurred in this Building on a daily basis. The issue of United Nations reform was of great importance beyond the Assembly and would be judged by a modicum of fair play included in the proceedings. Israel had joined in the consensus.


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SOO GIL PARK (Republic of Korea) expressed his appreciation to the representatives of Brazil and Norway in producing the consensus text, which was timely and appropriate for the Assembly. The reform process was a formidable undertaking which all Members must see to the end. The Secretary- General's reform proposals reflected mutual consultation and hours of negotiations. The resolution was balanced and represented the views of States as expressed in the informal consultations. Its adoption reaffirmed the collective commitment of Member States to make the Organization a more modern and efficient one.

CELSO AMORIM (Brazil) said he was satisfied with the Assembly's decision to adopt the resolution. The adoption by consensus was a positive signal on behalf of the Organization to face the challenges of the twenty-first century. He thanked all Member States for their cooperation and understanding in reaching that consensus.

BAGHER ASADI (Iran) said it was a compromise text, but not an ideal one. The Assembly had concluded part of the work, but now the collective endeavour continued. Iran had views on certain actions in the Secretary-General's report reflected in the position paper of the Group of 77. He hoped due consideration would be given to the views of the Group of 77 and the Non- Aligned Movement while the actions were implemented.

(annexes follow)


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General Assembly Plenary Press Release GA/9354/Rev.1 49th Meeting (PM) 12 November 1997

ANNEX I

Vote on third preambular paragraph of IAEA draft

The third preambular paragraph of the draft resolution on the report of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (document A/52/L.13) was adopted by a recorded vote of 137 in favour to 4 against, with 1 abstention:

In favour: Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia.

Against: Democratic People's Republic of Korea, India, Israel, Pakistan.

Abstain: Cuba.

Absent: Afghanistan, Albania, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahrain, Barbados, Belize, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chad, China, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Nicaragua, Palau, Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Syria, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Zimbabwe.

(END OF ANNEX I)


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General Assembly Plenary Press Release GA/9354/Rev.1 49th Meeting (PM) 12 November 1997

ANNEX II

Vote on seventh operative paragraph of IAEA draft

The seventh operative paragraph of the draft resolution on the report of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (document A/52/L.13) was adopted by a recorded vote of 114 in favour of 2 against, with 18 abstentions:

In favour: Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Belgium, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lesotho, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Maldives, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Zambia.

Against: Libya, Sudan.

Abstain: Belarus, Brunei Darussalam, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Ghana, Grenada, Guyana, India, Indonesia, Iran, Malaysia, Pakistan, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Viet Nam.

Absent: Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Barbados, Belize, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chad, China, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Jordan, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Nicaragua, Palau, Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Syria, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Yemen, Zimbabwe.


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(END OF ANNEX II)

General Assembly Plenary Press Release GA/9354/Rev.1 49th Meeting (PM) 12 November 1997

ANNEX III

Vote on report of International Atomic Energy Agency

The draft resolution on the report of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (document A/52/L.13) was approved by a recorded vote of 151 in favour to 1 against, with 5 abstentions:

In favour: Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Republic of the Congo, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Thailand, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia.

Against: Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

Abstain: China, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Syria, Viet Nam.


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Absent: Afghanistan, Albania, Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Belize, Cambodia, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Nicaragua, Palau, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Seychelles, Tajikistan, Uganda, Uzbekistan, Zimbabwe.

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