United Nations A/55/73

General Assembly Distr.: General
22 May 2000
Original: English

Fifty-fifth session

Agenda item 120 of the preliminary list*

Programme planning

 

Programme performance of the United Nations for the biennium 1998-1999

                                        Report of the Secretary-General**

 

   Contents

Paragraphs

Page

I. Introduction

1-5

3

II. Strengthening the monitoring modalities

6-13

4

III. An overview of programme performance in the biennium 1998-1999

14-35

6

IV. Resource utilization

36-40

19

V. Qualitative assessment of programme performance

41-55

21

VI. Findings and conclusions <

56-60

24

Annex
           Programme performance by section of the programme budget for the biennium 1998-1999

26

 

Summary

As required by the established regulations, the Secretary-General reports to the General Assembly on the programme performance of the United Nations following the completion of the biennial budget.

The programme budget of the United Nations for 1998-1999 included 22,830 programmed quantifiable outputs. In addition, 457 outputs were carried over from the previous biennium and 2,079 outputs were added by legislative bodies, bringing the total number of mandated outputs to 25,366. The Secretariat initiated 1,732 outputs, bringing the total number of outputs committed for implementation to 27,098. A total of 24,025 outputs were implemented utilizing 34,589 work-months, which comprised 70 per cent of all work-months available to the Secretariat, with the remaining 30 per cent devoted to international cooperation, inter-agency coordination and liaison, and technical cooperation activities. The average implementation rate was 88 per cent, ranging from 68 per cent to 100 per cent among the budget sections.

The report also reflects measures taken to strengthen monitoring modalities throughout the Secretariat and the use of electronic systems to monitor programme delivery.

Furthermore, in response to the General Assembly’s request to place more emphasis on qualitative analysis, a summary of significant qualitative aspects of programme performance is provided for each budget section.

 

I. Introduction

1. The monitoring of programme performance is an integral part of the programme planning, budgeting, implementation and evaluation cycle in the United Nations. The relevant Regulations of the United Nations and Rules Governing the Programme Planning, the Programme Aspects of the Budget, the Monitoring of Implementation, and the Methods of Evaluation (PPBME) were adopted by the General Assembly in its resolution 37/234 of 21 December 1982 and the corresponding Rules were promulgated by ST/SGB/PPBME/Rules/1(1987). The Regulations were subsequently amended by the Assembly in section I of its resolution 42/215 of 21 December 1987 and further amended in section III of its resolution 53/207 of 18 December 1998. The relevant revisions to the rules were reported by the Secretary-General in document A/54/125 of 7 June 1999. In resolution 54/236 of 23 December 1999, the General Assembly, having considered the report of the Committee for Programme and Coordination on the work of its thirty-ninth session,1 urged the Secretary-General to issue, as soon as possible, the revisions to the relevant rules of the revised Regulations, taking fully into account the recommendations of the Committee contained in paragraph 47 of its report.

2. Article VI of the revised Regulations, "Monitoring of programme implementation", states the following:

"Regulation 6.1. The Secretary-General shall monitor accomplishments through the delivery of output scheduled in the approved programme budget through a central unit in the Secretariat ... [and] report to the General Assembly, through the Committee for Programme and Coordination, on programme performance during that period after the completion of the biennial budget period.

"Regulation 6.2. An entire subprogramme shall not be reformulated nor a new programme introduced in the programme budget without the prior approval of an intergovernmental body and the General Assembly ...

"Regulation 6.3. The Secretary-General shall transmit the biennial programme performance report to all Member States by the end of the first quarter following the completion of the biennial budget period."

The present report has been prepared by the Office of Internal Oversight Services within the framework of Article VI and in line with the Secretary-General’s report on the methodology for monitoring and reporting programme performance (A/46/173) endorsed by General Assembly resolution 47/214.

3. The report analyses the programme performance of the Organization in terms of the implementation of outputs explicitly identified in the 1998-1999 budget narrative. It reflects modifications made to the programme of work during implementation, including the introduction of new activities by the legislative bodies and the Secretariat. It also provides explanations for non-implementation of outputs and reviews resources utilized broken down by sources of funding. Information on activities that are described in the programme budget in more general terms without specific indication of quantities to be delivered, such as international cooperation, inter-agency coordination and liaison, and operational activities, is included.

4. For the 1998-1999 biennium, programme managers were requested at the programme budgeting stage to ensure that the descriptions of the activities and services were presented clearly and concisely. It was also decided to quantify a larger number of outputs under the major substantive categories of activities. As a result, the overall number of outputs included in the current monitoring database exceeds the number of outputs quantified in 1996-1997. In calculating the status of implementation of outputs, the report follows the approach prescribed by rule 106.1 (d) of the revised PPBME (see A/54/125, p. 30). Conference and administrative services continue to be reported in terms of the relevant workload indicators.

5. At its thirty-eighth session in June 1998, the Committee for Programme Coordination (CPC) concluded that in future performance reports, more emphasis should be placed on qualitative analysis to reflect achievements in implementing programme activities (A/53/16,2 para. 33). This request was endorsed by the General Assembly, in its resolution 53/207, in which it also requested the Secretary-General to report, with clear evidence, on the impact of the reform of the Organization and restructuring of the Secretariat on programme delivery during the biennium 1998-1999 in the context of the report on the programme performance of the United Nations for that biennium. Accordingly, the present report provides a qualitative assessment of programme performance by budget section, including the impact of ongoing reform measures.

 

II. Strengthening the monitoring modalities

6. One of the key elements of the Secretary-General’s programme for reform was to empower programme managers by strengthening their authority, responsibility and accountability for the effective delivery of programmes under their purview. In line with this strategy, and in an effort gradually to transform the monitoring exercise to include a performance evaluation function, the Under-Secretary-General for Management and the Under-Secretary-General for Internal Oversight Services jointly issued guidelines for programme monitoring and evaluation in November 1997. The guidelines underscored the responsibility of the heads of departments and offices for the continuous and effective internal monitoring of programme performance as prescribed by rule 106.2 of the PPBME. Heads of departments and offices were urged not only to monitor the production of outputs, but also to make a concerted effort to identify the major users of their outputs and services, to track indicators of the use made of their work, and shift to a more active concern with client satisfaction. They were also requested to strengthen their programme monitoring procedures, and to establish electronic systems which would allow the Office of Internal Oversight Services to have read-only access and thus obviate the need for paper-based reports.

7. While all departments and offices covered by the current report had monitoring systems in place, the designs, structures and technologies used varied. In the majority of cases, the systems consisted of "traditional" paper-based top-down structured work plans, i.e., each organizational unit corresponding to a subprogramme prepared a work plan setting out its general tasks, responsibilities and assignments for each year of the biennium. These plans served as the framework for all activities to be carried out by the respective sub-units. Various elements of the work plans were incorporated into the performance appraisal system (PAS) work plans for each individual staff member. PAS were subject to mid-year reviews and final annual appraisals. Progress in implementing the work programme was monitored through periodic reporting to an internal focal point, and group reviews at staff meetings at different levels of hierarchy, with an overall review by the head of a department/office with senior managers. Such discussions were often preceded and aided by a detailed scrutiny by a special unit charged with monitoring the implementation of programmed outputs, bringing to bear appropriate recommendations of oversight bodies, and internal and external evaluations. Bottlenecks either in the organization of workflows or resource-wise were identified, and appropriate measures for executive decision were recommended. A common feature was a statistical database on an entity’s performance.

8. A more advanced approach was followed for example, in the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA), where the monitoring procedures and systems were established by the Programme Management Guidelines, which defined such tools as programme implementation plans, and task briefs, and explained their operational application, and established procedures for quality assurance and criteria for performance assessment.

9. Some departments and offices developed, internally, computer-based monitoring systems which aim at allowing continuous and comprehensive control by programme managers over the progress in implementing each output, and the production of summary statistical reports for a given entity. One good example was the computer-based Corporate Management Information System (CMIS), which became operational and available on-line to all staff in the International Trade Centre (UNCTAD/WTO) (ITC) in the second half of the biennium. It covered programme data such as types of outputs, core functions, product and service groups, geographical coverage, donor funding, etc. that complemented budget and finance applications. Conceived in a modular fashion as a tool for planning, monitoring and reporting, it currently encompasses the annual operations plan and two additional modules covering the development and the implementation phases of the project cycle, respectively. Data are regularly entered into the system and continuously updated. The flexibility and interactivity of the system offers a promising potential for an enhanced management capability and institutional memory.

10. Programme monitoring systems developed in the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) and the Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) were the most advanced. During the last biennium, the programme monitoring system (PROMS) of ESCAP, which had been created many years earlier, was improved to ensure enhanced functionality and database security, including a secretariat-wide network to facilitate direct entry and retrieval of data and information by the substantive Divisions. PROMS has focused on including the section level into the monitoring modality, enhancing the versatility of the system and designing a basic interface with the global computerized monitoring system developed by the Department of Economic and Social Affairs.

11. At Headquarters, an integrated monitoring and documentation information system (IMDIS) was established by the Department of Economic and Social Affairs on behalf of the Executive Committee on Economic and Social Affairs. IMDIS is a web-based information service connected to a dynamic database centrally secured and administered at United Nations Headquarters. It has been designed as a management tool to facilitate continuous and comprehensive monitoring by programme managers at different unit levels. Activities in IMDIS are organized according to categories of work defined in the programme budget instructions for 1998-1999. Primary responsibility for reporting rests with the managers of a subprogramme. Information entered by them is automatically available to the head of department or office, who has ultimate responsibility for reporting on the performance of a programme. The Office of Internal Oversight Services accesses departmental submissions and reviews the status of output implementation. IMDIS has played an important role in strengthening intra-departmental discipline in performance monitoring, and facilitating the flow of management information bottom-up.

12. The above-mentioned systems developed at ITC and ESCAP proved to be excellent tools for collecting and processing data and information essential for the continuous and comprehensive monitoring of programmed activities. However, IMDIS had the comparative advantage of providing on-line Intranet access and covering all the social and economic areas of the Organization, and was chosen by the Office of Internal Oversight Services as the monitoring system for the present report. Ten departments utilized IMDIS for the current exercise with assistance from the Department of Economic and Social Affairs and the Office of Internal Oversight Services. In a striking display of interdepartmental cooperation, the Department of Economic and Social Affairs provided invaluable assistance to the Office of Internal Oversight Services and other departments in applying IMDIS to the 1998-1999 performance report.

13. The lessons learned from the preparation of the 1998-1999 performance report highlighted the imperatives of further developing qualitative performance measurements, and making computer-based reporting an integral part of the Organization’s management culture. This will require a study, jointly with substantive departments and the Office of programme Planning, Budget and Accounts, of performance reporting in the light of the expected accomplishments stated in the programme budget for 2000-2001. The review would include further refinement of the technological infrastructure required to facilitate performance reporting in this biennium within departments, as well as centrally to the Office of Internal Oversight Services.

 

III. An overview of programme performance in the biennium 1998-1999

14. As mentioned in paragraph 4 above, instructions for the 1998-1999 budget requested programme managers to quantify separately outputs/activities, which were previously considered "non-output" services. Those categories included such substantive activities as good offices, fact-finding, human rights and humanitarian assessment missions. Consequently, the total number of quantifiable programmed outputs increased considerably in 1998-1999. To a large degree the increase falls under "substantive servicing of meetings" owing to the fact that a three-hour meeting has now been counted as one output.

15. The programme budget for the biennium 1998-1999 included the major changes required to implement the reforms proposed by the Secretary-General to the General Assembly. Those changes are contained in document A/52/303 and in new programme narratives for section 7A, Economic and social affairs and section 26, Public information (E/AC.51/1998/6 (Sect. 7A) and Corr.1 and (Sect. 26)).The 1998-1999 programme budget comprised 22,830 final outputs specifically identified in the budget. In addition, 457 outputs carried over from the previous biennium as well as 2,079 outputs added to the Organization’s programme of work during the biennium by legislative bodies, were also due for implementation in 1998-1999, thus bringing the total number of outputs to be implemented to 25,366. Furthermore, 1,732 outputs were added to the workload and implemented at the initiative of the Secretariat. The four different sources of activities scheduled for implementation can be represented in the following graph:

16. Of those outputs, 23,491 were completed as programmed during the biennium while 534 outputs were completed after reformulations (both are counted as implemented). An output is considered reformulated when its description as cited in the programme budget has been modified, but it continues to address the subject matter of the originally programmed output. A total of 1,148 outputs were postponed to the following biennium (whether commenced, substantially in progress or not started) and 1,925 were terminated as obsolete, of marginal usefulness, ineffective or, owing to vacancies and the shortage of extrabudgetary funds. Postponements and terminations of outputs occurred either by legislative decisions or at the discretion of programme managers in accordance with rule 106.2 (b) of the Regulations and Rules. Annex I to the present report provides, for each section of the biennial budget, a summary of the status of implementation including departures from commitments and work-months utilized, as well as a qualitative assessment of programme performance. The status of implementation of all activities is illustrated by the following graph:

Implementation

17. The focus of the present report is on the delivery of outputs, which may be best described through an implementation rate of the Secretariat’s work programme. The implementation rate could be calculated in three different ways, depending on what is included as the workload of the biennium. The first calculation (I1) shows the ratio of outputs implemented to the sum of all mandated outputs (programmed plus carried over plus added by legislation). It reflects the delivery of outputs which were scheduled for implementation in the programme budget, and those additionally mandated during the course of the biennium. This is the formula traditionally used in the programme performance reports for the previous bienniums.

18. In the second version, the total implementation rate (I2) will show performance in respect of all commitments in the biennium, including all mandated outputs, plus additional outputs initiated by programme managers, which indicates how much of the overall workload of the biennium was accomplished.

19. Finally, the third formula (I3) is calculated as the ratio of all implemented outputs (programmed, reformulated and added by legislation and by the Secretariat) to the outputs programmed in the 1998-1999 budget. This indicator shows what was achieved overall with the available resources; while budgetary resources were provided to deliver the programmed outputs, unforeseen developments during the biennium resulted in additions to the workload.

20. The three versions of the implementation rate for each programme are summarized in table 1 below. Data on outputs reflect the total number. In analysing the implementation rates, it is important to keep in mind that they refer only to quantified outputs in addition to which, the programmes of work of each department/office comprised non-quantifiable activities such as international cooperation, inter-agency coordination and liaison as well as technical cooperation activities such as advisory services, seminars and workshops, fellowships and field projects. Those non-quantified activities accounted for 30 per cent of total Professional work-months reported as utilized in the implementation of the 1998-1999 programme of work.

21. The overall implementation of mandated quantifiable outputs, at 88 per cent of the total, was at the highest level during the last decade. It compares favourably with 76.7 per cent in 1992-1993, 75.5 per cent in 1994-1995 and 80 per cent in 1996-1997 (A/53/122, table 1).

22. It might appear that the implementation rates are not directly comparable with the past since the outputs database in 1998-1999 comprised a larger number of quantifiable activities than in previous bienniums. However, such comparison is entirely valid, as long as relative indicators, such as implementation rates, and not absolute numbers are involved. To ascertain that the increased scope of quantifiable activities did not distort the implementation rate, the Office of Internal Oversight Services calculated it Secretariat-wide without the category "substantive servicing of meetings" (which had the highest number of outputs) and ended with the same 88 per cent. Further deduction of "other substantive activities", which was significantly enlarged through the new quantification of outputs, resulted in a slightly lower implementation rate of 85 per cent for the scope of activities identical with the previous biennium. Nevertheless, this calculation was 5 percentage points higher than in 1996-1997.

23. Among budget sections, the implementation rate of mandated outputs varies by about 34 percentage points. Within that range, 10 out of 23 budget sections (almost half of the Organization) achieved implementation rates of 90 per cent or higher; another 7 (or one third of all) implemented between 80 per cent and 90 per cent of mandated outputs; and only 5 out of 23 budget sections had implementation rates lower than 80 per cent.

24. The reasons for lower implementation rates varied. In section 13, Human settlements, shortfall in implementation was mostly due to outputs terminated because of non-receipt of extrabudgetary resources (reason given for 73 per cent of total terminated outputs). All other terminations were in the context of programmatic refocusing and restructuring within the framework of the ongoing revitalization exercise. Similarly, in section 8, Africa: New Agenda for Development, the comparatively low implementation rate was caused both by terminations and programmatic readjustments due to the shortage of extrabudgetary funds. In ITC (section 11B), the termination of 17 programmed outputs due to the thematic realignment was more than offset by the addition of 26 outputs by the Secretariat, that resulted in an implementation rate of 68 per cent for mandated activities and a rate of 144 per cent when all implemented outputs were related to those programmed. The fast-moving environment faced by ITC clientele, i.e., the business sector, dictated priorities and adjustments to the work programme (whether additions, terminations, reformulations) to comply with the programmatic orientation and direction set by the annual legislative Joint Advisory Group meeting, and influenced in many cases by the availability of extrabudgetary resources. For the Department of General Assembly Affairs and Conference Services, outputs postponed were mostly due to legislative decisions not to hold previously programmed meetings such as those of the High-level Open-ended Working Group on the Financial Situation of the United Nations, which explains the lower-than-average implementation rate.

Table 1
Implementation rates by programme budget section

   

Implementation rates (%)

Section

Total outputs

I1

I2

I3

1B. General Assembly affairs and conference services

1 201

66

66

66

2A. Political affairs

1 614

98

98

99

2B. Disarmament

2 486

72

72

103

3A. Peacekeeping and special missions operations

86

100

100

100

4. Peaceful uses of outer space

873

91

91

172

6. Legal affairs

1 809

85

87

102

7A. Economic and social affairs

2 689

91

91

107

8. Africa: New Agenda for Development

110

70

74

96

11A. Trade and development

866

81

82

99

11B. International Trade Centre (UNCTAD/WTO)

103

68

76

144

12. Environment

2 080

90

93

146

13. Human settlements

235

69

71

84

14. Crime control

263

86

86

91

15. International drug control

425

93

93

110

16A. Economic and social development in Africa

387

87

89

114

17. Economic and social development in Asia and the Pacific

1 040

84

85

97

18. Economic development in Europe

2 125

86

87

97

19. Economic and social development in Latin America and the Caribbean

459

91

92

96

20. Economic and social development in Western Asia

185

99

99

109

22. Human rights

4 570

95

95

106

23. Protection and assistance to refugees

213

100

100

100

25. Humanitarian assistance

2 872

97

97

110

26. Public information

407

86

87

99

 

Grand Total

27 098

88

89

105

25. It could be suggested that the I3 implementation rate, which is the ratio of all implemented outputs to the outputs initially programmed, provides a better perspective on the intensity of work implementation in different organizational entities. This indicator recognizes that it is not always feasible to plan output delivery with exactitude two to three years in advance. The impact of changing external factors and internal restructuring necessitate relevant changes in the substantive work of departments and offices, usually manifested in a demand for the delivery of additional outputs within available budgetary resources. Such additions could be numerous. For example, while 463 outputs were initially programmed in section 4, Peaceful uses of outer space, 388 outputs were added by legislation and 20 more by the Secretariat in the course of the biennium, resulting in an implementation rate of 172 per cent against the initial workload. The number of added outputs related to the preparations for and servicing of the UNISPACE III Conference, which indicates that the initially programmed activities were underestimated. Consequently, the Office for Outer Space Affairs carried out the additional work through extensive overtime by its staff, and assistance provided by interns and volunteers.

26. The quantifiable outputs which account for 70 per cent of the Professional work-months reported by departments as utilized for carrying out the overall programme of work of the Organization, fall under six main activity types. Table 2 below presents the quantitative significance of each category both in terms of quantifiable outputs, as well as the implementation results reflected in the three different rates explained above. The category "Substantive servicing of meetings" reflects only United Nations meetings and conferences and, as earlier noted, a three-hour meeting is counted as one output. The category of "Other substantive activities" incorporates such diverse activities as: good offices, fact-finding and other special missions on behalf of the Secretary-General; human rights and humanitarian assessment and relief missions, issuance of appeals for international assistance and fund-raising missions; promotion of legal instruments, including development of related standards; electronic, audio and video issuances, exhibits, booklets, information kits, special events and seminars and technical material for outside users. The last four categories are self-explanatory.

Table 2
Implementation results for major categories of activities

 

Total outputs

 

Implementation rates (%)

Activity type

Number

%

I1

I2

I3

Substantive servicing of meetings

12 381

46

88

88

96

Other substantive activities

5 368

20

93

94

110

Parliamentary documentation

4 850

18

89

90

125

Non-recurrent publications

2 105

8

78

82

117

Recurrent publications

1 571

6

76

78

89

Ad hoc expert groups

823

3

89

91

138

Grand Total

27 098

100

88

89

105

 

 

27. The low implementation rates for non-recurrent and recurrent publications are mostly due to postponements, which account for 8.7 per cent and 9.4 per cent, respectively, and terminations — 9.1 per cent and 12.8 per cent, respectively, of total outputs in these categories. The main reason behind these shortfalls are: programmatic, such as unforeseen developments requiring the redeployment of resources to other activities, and logistical, such as delays in printing and/or final processing of substantively completed outputs, which accounted for 63 per cent of postponements and terminations in both categories. The shortage of extrabudgetary resources resulted in 21 per cent of all postponements and terminations; regular budget vacancies accounted for 10 per cent; legislative decisions for 4 per cent. Extrabudgetary vacancies accounted for 2 per cent of non-implemented outputs in those two categories of activities.

Additions

28. In the course of the biennium, 3,811 outputs were added to the programme of work either by intergovernmental bodies or the Secretariat and implemented. In relative terms, the level of additions was similar to the previous biennium: in 1996-1997 these outputs represented about 14 per cent of the total outputs programmed and carried over from the earlier biennium: the ratio was close to 16 per cent in 1998-1999. More than half — 55 per cent — of the additions were introduced by intergovernmental bodies, mostly in two categories of outputs: parliamentary documentation, which accounted for 52 per cent of legislative additions, and in substantive servicing of meetings, which comprised another 38 per cent.

Table 3
Additional outputs in major categories of activities

   

Reasons for additions

 
     

Secretariat

 
Activity type

Total added

Legislation

Total

Programmatic

XB availability

Additions (%)*

Substantive servicing of meetings

1 017

781

236

236

0

9

Other substantive activities

671

50

621

573

48

14

Parliamentary documentation

1 343

1 077

266

265

1

38

Non-recurrent publications

420

55

365

354

11

25

Recurrent publications

92

0

92

91

1

6

Ad hoc expert groups

268

116

152

147

5

48

Grand total

3 811

2 079

1 732

1 666

66

16

* As percentage of total programmed and carried-forward quantifiable outputs.

29. Additions by the Secretariat were spread out more evenly between the categories, with other substantive activities accounting for 36 per cent and three other categories each comprising between 14 per cent and 21 per cent. Programmatic reasons accounted for 96 per cent of additions by the Secretariat.

Table 4
Additions by programme budget section

   

Reasons for additions

 
     

Secretariat

 
Sections

Total added

Legislation

Total

Programmatic

XB availability

Additions (%)*

1B.

General Assembly affairs and conference services

0

0

0

0

0

0

2A.

Political affairs

14

9

5

1

4

1

2B.

Disarmament

739

707

32

31

1

42

3A.

Peacekeeping operations and special missions

0

0

0

0

0

0

4.

Peaceful uses of outer space

408

388

20

19

1

88

6.

Legal affairs

253

32

221

221

0

16

7A.

Economic and social affairs

356

241

115

111

4

15

8.

Africa: New Agenda for Development

16

4

12

10

2

17

11A.

Trade and development

111

78

33

31

2

15

11B.

International Trade Centre (UNCTAD/WTO)

26

0

26

26

0

34

12.

Environment

639

45

594

544

50

44

13.

Human settlements

13

0

13

13

0

6

14.

Crime control

3

1

2

2

0

1

15.

International drug control

43

21

22

22

0

11

16A.

Economic and social development in Africa

81

22

59

59

0

26

17.

Economic and social development in Asia and the Pacific

88

35

53

53

0

9

18.

Economic development in Europe

176

14

162

162

0

9

19.

Economic and social development in Latin America and the Caribbean

19

0

19

19

0

4

20.

Economic and social development in Western Asia

15

11

4

3

1

9

22.

Human rights

457

291

166

166

0

11

23.

Protection and assistance to refugees

0

0

0

0

0

0

25.

Humanitarian assistance

327

180

147

147

0

13

26.

Public information

27

0

27

26

1

7

  Grand total

3 811

2 079

1 732

1 666

66

16

* As percentage of total programmed and carried-forward quantifiable outputs.

30. Five budget sections -- disarmament, peaceful uses of outer space, economic and social affairs, human rights and environment — accounted for 68 per cent of all additional outputs. In the first four sections, 83 per cent of additions were introduced by legislative bodies. For section 12, Environment, 93 per cent of programmatic changes were introduced by the Secretariat following the organizational and programmatic restructuring of the United Nations Environment Programme approved by the special session of the Governing Council in 1998. Additional programme activities were undertaken to carry out the legislatively approved priorities in the work programme.

Departures from programmed commitments

31. Out of the 25,366 mandated outputs — which include those outputs initially programmed in the biennial budget, carried over from the previous biennium and added by legislation — 1,148, i.e., 5 per cent were postponed. An output is considered "postponed" if, irrespective of its stage of completion, it was not delivered to primary users by the end of the biennium. The relative ratio of postponements and terminations decreased significantly in 1998-1999 to 12.1 per cent compared to 20 per cent in 1996-1997. This can be viewed as a reflection of the measures taken to strengthen the discipline of output delivery. Table 5 below shows the distribution of postponements between the main categories of activities, while table 6 below provides explanations for the main reasons for the postponement of outputs by section of the programme budget.

Table 5
Postponement in the main categories of activity

   

Reasons for postponement

 
Activity type

Total postponed

Legislation

Programmatic

RB vacancy

XB vacancy

XB shortage

Postponements (%)*

Substantive servicing of meetings

636

611

25

0

0

0

6

Other substantive activities

114

4

78

7

0

25

2

Parliamentary documentation

51

34

14

1

1

1

1

Non-recurrent publications

184

8

146

19

2

9

11

Recurrent publications

147

3

77

21

4

42

10

Ad hoc expert groups

16

3

11

1

0

1

3

Grand total

1 148

663

351

49

7

78

5

* As percentage of total programmed and carried-forward quantifiable outputs.

Table 6
Reasons for the postponement of outputs

   

Reasons for postponement

 
Sections

Total postponed

Legislation

Programmatic

RB vacancy

XB vacancy

XB shortage

Postponements (%)*

1B. General Assembly affairs and conference services

406

405

0

0

0

1

34

2A. Political affairs

22

16

2

0

0

4

1

2B. Disarmament

114

107

7

0

0

0

7

3A. Peacekeeping operations and special missions

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

4. Peaceful uses of outer space

3

0

3

0

0

0

1

6. Legal affairs

61

30

27

2

0

2

4

7A. Economic and social affairs

86

16

45

22

0

3

4

8. Africa: New Agenda for Development

2

0

1

1

0

0

2

11A. Trade and development

47

18

19

9

0

1

6

11B. International Trade Centre (UNCTAD/WTO)

8

0

7

0

0

1

10

12. Environment

79

4

59

1

0

15

5

13. Human settlements

13

1

5

0

1

6

6

14. Crime control

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

15. International drug control

17

2

15

0

0

0

4

16A. Economic and social development in Africa

9

0

9

0

0

0

3

17. Economic and social development in Asia and the Pacific

66

0

63

3

0

0

7

18. Economic development in Europe

67

11

44

9

1

2

3

19. Economic and social development in Latin America and the Caribbean

8

1

6

1

0

0

2

20. Economic and social development in Western Asia

1

0

0

1

0

0

1

22. Human rights

111

52

13

0

5

41

3

23. Protection and assistance to refugees

1

0

0

0

0

1

0

25. Humanitarian assistance

13

0

12

0

0

1

1

26. Public information

13

0

13

0

0

0

3

  Grand total

1 148

663

351

49

7

78

5

* As percentage of total programmed and carried-forward quantifiable outputs.

32. The postponements mostly concerned meetings and publications which jointly accounted for 84 per cent of the total. This pattern is similar to previous bienniums, as conflicting schedules or the intense programme of work of various intergovernmental and expert bodies often require shifting planned meetings to the future. When the programme budget was formulated, a number of sessions and meetings of legislative and intergovernmental bodies were predicted, together with the required supporting parliamentary documentation. However, the subsequent restructuring of the intergovernmental machinery in several areas, or revisions to the programme of work of various bodies, led to the postponement of a number of meetings as well as of the related documentation or publications.

33. A total of 1,925 outputs were terminated in 1998-1999, representing 8 per cent of the 25,366 mandated outputs. Fifty-three per cent of terminated outputs was based on legislative decision; programmatic reasons at the discretion of programme managers in accordance with rule 106.2 (b) of the PPBME accounted for 33 per cent; and 14 per cent were attributable to vacancies and shortage of extrabudgetary resources. Eighty-six per cent of all terminations was in the categories of substantive servicing of meetings, parliamentary documentation and recurrent and non-recurrent publications.

Table 7
Terminations in the main category of activity

   

Reasons for terminations

 
Activity type

Total terminated

Legislation

Programmatic

RB vacancy

XB vacancy

XB shortage

Terminations (%)*

Substantive servicing of meetings

828

653

144

14

0

17

7

Other substantive activities

210

42

96

30

4

38

4

Parliamentary documentation

437

292

128

13

0

4

12

Non-recurrent publications

192

15

96

24

2

55

11

Recurrent publications

201

4

135

11

3

48

14

Ad hoc expert groups

57

5

40

1

0

11

10

Grand total

1 925

1 011

639

93

9

173

8

* As percentage of total programmed and carried-forward quantifiable outputs.

34. At its thirty-ninth session in June 1999, the CPC requested that future performance reports provide clear justification and criteria for the termination of outputs (see A/54/15, para. 43). Table 8 below provides reasons for the termination of outputs by budget section. In respect of section 2B, Disarmament, it should be noted that the majority of terminated outputs occurred because the fourth special session of the General Assembly devoted to disarmament, and its Preparatory Committee, as well as the subsidiary bodies of the Conference on Disarmament did not take place in 1999.

Table 8
Reasons for the termination of outputs by budget section

   

Reasons for termination

 
Sections

Total terminated

Legislation

Programmatic

RB vacancy

XB vacancy

XB shortage

Terminations (%)*

1B. General Assembly affairs and conference services

2

1

1

0

0

0

0

2A. Political affairs

12

7

5

0

0

0

1

2B. Disarmament

577

566

2

0

0

9

33

3A. Peacekeeping operations and special missions

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

4. Peaceful uses of outer space

73

50

23

0

0

0

16

6. Legal affairs

172

44

121

7

0

0

11

7A. Economic and social affairs

149

72

53

9

0

15

6

8. Africa: New Agenda for Development

27

5

10

0

0

12

29

11A. Trade and development

113

1

105

3

0

4

15

11B. International Trade Centre (UNCTAD/WTO)

17

0

4

0

1

12

22

12. Environment

67

0

38

3

7

19

5

13. Human settlements

55

13

2

0

0

40

25

14. Crime control

36

35

0

1

0

0

14

15. International drug control

13

1

12

0

0

0

3

16A. Economic and social development in Africa

35

3

17

10

0

5

11

17. Economic and social development in Asia and the Pacific

91

4

53

17

0

17

10

18. Economic development in Europe

216

104

72

21

1

18

11

19. Economic and social development in Latin America and the Caribbean

30

0

17

7

0

6

7

20. Economic and social development in Western Asia

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

22. Human rights

125

92

18

0

0

15

3

23. Protection and assistance to refugees

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

25. Humanitarian assistance

74

13

61

0

0

0

3

26. Public information

41

0

25

15

0

1

11

  Grand total

1 925

1 011

639

93

9

173

8

* As percentage of total programmed and carried-forward quantifiable outputs.

Outputs carried over

35. Tables 9 and 10 below provide information on the status of implementation of outputs that were due for implementation in 1996-1997 and were subsequently reported as postponed to 1998-1999 in the report of the Secretary-General on programme performance for the biennium 1996-1997 (A/53/122). Out of 457 outputs carried over, 64 per cent were implemented, 15 per cent were further postponed and the remaining 21 per cent were terminated. The bulk of further postponements and terminations fell under the category of non-recurrent and recurrent publications, which jointly accounted for 70 per cent. There is an obvious need to review the continuing relevance and usefulness of such publications, when they have been postponed over two bienniums.

Table 9
Status of outputs carried forward by categories of activities

     

Status of implementation

Activity type

Carried forward from 1996-1997

Implemented

Postponed to 2000-2001

Terminated

Substantive servicing of meetings

20

17

0

3

Other substantive activities

97

61

20

16

Parliamentary documentation

19

12

1

6

Non-recurrent publications

201

136

28

37

Recurrent publications

109

59

20

30

Ad hoc expert groups

11

7

0

4

Grand total

457

292

69

96

 

Table 10
Status of outputs carried forward by budget section

       

Status of implementation

Sections

Carried forward from 1996-1997

Implemented

Postponed to 2000-2001

Terminated

1B. General Assembly affairs and conference services

0

0

0

0

2A. Political affairs

2

2

0

0

2B. Disarmament

0

0

0

0

3A. Peacekeeping operations and special missions

0

0

0

0

4. Peaceful uses of outer space

2

2

0

0

6. Legal affairs

16

9

2

5

7A. Economic and social affairs

37

20

6

11

8. Africa: New Agenda for Development

10

6

0

4

11A. Trade and development

39

32

1

6

11B. International Trade Centre (UNCTAD/WTO)

23

10

3

10

12. Environment

114

82

22

10

13. Human settlements

22

10

3

9

14. Crime control

13

10

1

2

15. International drug control

23

14

1

8

16A. Economic and social development in Africa

5

0

0

5

17. Economic and social development in Asia and the Pacific

44

33

7

4

18. Economic development in Europe

47

33

7

7

19. Economic and social development in Latin America and the Caribbean

2

1

0

1

20. Economic and social development in Western Asia

1

1

0

0

22. Human rights

24

7

16

1

23. Protection and assistance to refugees

0

0

0

0

25. Humanitarian assistance

8

6

0

2

26. Public information

25

14

0

11

  Grand total

457

292

69

96

 

IV. Resource utilization

36. A total of 49,140 work-months (including consultant work-months) were reported by programme managers as utilized to carry out the programme of work in 1998-1999. Of those work-months, 88 per cent were provided by Professional staff, 12 per cent by consultants. By source of funding, 72 per cent of total work-months were financed from the regular budget and 28 per cent from extrabudgetary resources. The relative weight of professionals and consultants was different in two sources of funding while the regular budget financed 77 per cent of total Professional staff work-months, extrabudgetary resources provided for 63 per cent of consultant work-months. The breakdown of the work-months utilized by type of activities is set out in table 11 below.

Table 11
Distribution of Professional work-months utilized under main categories of activities in the biennium 1998-1999

Activity type

Regular budget

(%)

Extrabudgetary

(%)

Grand total

(%)

Servicing of intergovernmental and expert bodies

9 303.4

26

1 723.7

12

11 027.1

22

Substantive servicing of meetings

3 143.7

9

597.6

4

3 741.3

8

Parliamentary documentation

4 649.7

13

664.0

5

5 313.7

11

Ad hoc expert groups

1 510.0

4

462.1

3

1 972.1

4

Other substantive activities

17 691.1

50

5 871.0

43

23 562.1

48

Recurrent publications

4 044.6

11

626.7

5

4 671.3

10

Non-recurrent publications

4 303.2

12

2 190.1

16

6 493.3

13

Other substantive activities

9 343.3

26

3 054.2

22

12 397.5

25

International cooperation, inter-agency coordination and liaison

2 849.1

8

818.1

6

3 667.2

7

Technical cooperation

5 497.5

16

5 385.8

39

10 883.3

22

Advisory services

2 499.0

7

1 054.0

8

3 553.0

7

Training courses, seminars and workshops

1 669.1

5

1 513.5

11

3 182.6

6

Fellowships and grants

15.6

0

27.5

0

43.1

0

Field projects

1 313.8

4

2 790.8

20

4 104.6

8

Grand total

35 341.1

100

13 798.6

100

49 139.7

100

37. Table 11 shows that 34,589 work-months, i.e., 70 per cent of the total work-months utilized, were committed to the implementation of 27,098 quantifiable outputs (see table 1 above) under the "servicing of intergovernmental and expert bodies" and "other substantive activities".

38. Between budget sections, the highest share of work-months devoted for the production of quantifiable outputs was in Public information, Africa: New Agenda for Development, Economic development in Europe, and Political affairs, with ratios above 85 per cent.

39. The proportion of the resources committed to non-quantifiable activities in the fields of international cooperation, inter-agency coordination and liaison was 8 per cent (6 per cent less than in 1996-1997), and to technical cooperation activities was 22 per cent (6 per cent less than the previous biennium). Of those work-months, almost two thirds were utilized to implement activities for the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), the regular programme of technical cooperation, the Department of Economic and Social Affairs and the United Nations Centre for Human Settlements (Habitat).

40. The data in table 11 indicates that 24 per cent of total regular budget work-months were utilized for the above-cited non-quantifiable activities and 45 per cent of total work-months from extrabudgetary resources were devoted to those activities.

 

V. Qualitative assessment of programme performance

41. To comply with the legislative requests cited in paragraph 5 above, the present report provides a qualitative assessment of programme performance for each budget section. In considering its approach to a qualitative assessment, the Office of Internal Oversight Services researched available material concerning the qualitative measurement of performance, and the practical experiences of pilot applications in some national civil services. All methods cited were based on benchmarking the desirable quality goals at the initial budgeting phase and then measuring the achievements against the established quality benchmarks. None of them was directly applicable to the 1998-1999 budget of the United Nations, which was conceived and formulated in terms of activities and services to be undertaken, and did not establish any synthetic quality benchmarks. It was not therefore feasible to measure the quality of programme performance by using quantifiable indicators. The approach chosen was to provide concise information highlighting the more significant qualitative aspects of performance for each programme.

42. The assessments contain the following elements:

    (a) Summary of objectives in accordance with the medium-term plan, the 1998-1999 programme budget and other principal planning documents;

    (b) Assessment criteria, by which the quality of performance is judged;

    (c) Description of major benefits realized, including the effect or impact that the implementation of the programme/subprogramme had on its various beneficiaries at different levels;

    (d) Assessments of programme delivery by relevant legislative bodies;

    (e) Overview of external and internal reviews and evaluations of the programme delivery during the biennium, of the most significant recommendations of oversight bodies and follow-up action; and

    (f) A summary of the impact of the reform of the Organization and restructuring of the Secretariat, as applicable, on the efficiency of programme delivery.

43. Given the Secretariat-wide scope of the present report and established document-length limitations, the qualitative assessments present an encapsulation of the elements described above. They complement the statistics on programme implementation by highlighting the substance behind the numbers and provide a bird’s eye view of the benefits brought about by the diverse substantive, operational and servicing activities of the Organization.

44. It should be borne in mind that the assessments are condensed versions of much more detailed, in-depth substantive reporting by departments/offices on their work to the relevant legislative, sectoral, functional, expert, and other intergovernmental bodies, in the course of the biennium. For example, the two-page qualitative assessment table of UNCTAD conveys the gist of its 84-page-long report on "Programme activities and assessments for the biennium 1998-1999", made available to UNCTAD member States at the meeting of the Committee of the Whole, the preparatory committee for the tenth session of the Conference (UNCTAD X), on 17 January 2000. The same situation applies to each section of the budget. Furthermore, programme areas of the Secretariat have been subjected to in-depth evaluations, triennial reviews of the implementation of recommendations by the Committee of Programme and Coordination on evaluations, external expert reviews, management audits and numerous other programmatic oversight exercises during the past biennium. Thus, the qualitative assessments in the current report need to be seen in the light of what they seek to present, an overview of the substantive aspects of the Organization’s delivered outputs, each segment of which can be further examined and focused on by referring to the more detailed, specialized assessments and evaluations, contained in other reports.

45. The preparation of qualitative assessments induced an end-of-biennium self-evaluation of the outcomes of programme delivery for all programme managers. The shift in outlook from simple accounting for implemented outputs to more in-depth, substantive review of the results brought about by their implementation undoubtedly helped programme managers to take stock of the lessons learned during the past biennium, and to consider how to apply them to the current one. Continued application of such review should serve as an instrument for strengthening managerial discipline and accountability. The following general conclusions can be drawn from the qualitative assessments.

46. In the maintenance of international peace and security, closer international cooperation in identifying potential conflicts, formulating preventive measures and enhanced capacity to negotiate peaceful settlements was achieved. Mechanisms for training and deploying peacekeepers were improved and logistical infrastructure of field missions was strengthened; mine action service became more effective. The collection and exchange of information on armaments and disarmament issues in support of existing multilateral agreements were made more timely, comprehensive and inclusive, the issue of small arms was brought to the fore and global outreach to civil society became more pronounced.

47. In its efforts to promote sustainable economic growth and human development, the Organization made tangible advances in mobilizing international and regional action on cross-cutting issues of population, environment, poverty, employment and gender through policy advice on pertinent strategies, fostering intergovernmental discussions and major outreach activities at various levels to civil society and the private sector, especially in following up on relevant resolutions and outcomes of recent United Nations global conferences. Authoritative analytical studies, technical assistance and training contributed to capacity-building essential for sustainable development. Many regional and sectoral entities have established themselves as global centres of excellence on specific issues.

48. The last biennium witnessed a considerably more proactive and effective role for the United Nations in the promotion and protection of human rights, which was integrated as a cross-cutting theme in the areas of development, humanitarian assistance and peace and security. A strategy for the implementation of the right to development was put into action; treaty and fact-finding bodies and other human rights mechanisms became more effective; national capacities for promoting and protecting human rights were consistently strengthened.

49. The reform and restructuring of humanitarian assistance resulted in more effective system-wide coordination and closer collaboration with governments and NGOs; enhanced international preparedness and mobilization of resources to tackle natural and man-made disasters; and fostered linkages with reconstruction and development.

50. The role of the United Nations in the promotion of international justice and law became active and diverse: effective legal support was provided to the implementation of Security Council and General Assembly resolutions; legal and legislative frameworks were established for the missions in Kosovo and East Timor; an essential contribution was provided to the adoption of the Statute of the International Criminal Court; established legal order for oceans and seas was strengthened; and harmonization and unification of the law of international trade was advanced.

51. Reforms in the areas of drug control and crime prevention, carried out in the biennium, led to a much more active role played by the United Nations in fighting transnational organized crime through strengthening international legal instruments, expanding operational activities, disseminating technical expertise and best practices and catalysing cooperation between decision makers, legal enforcement and civil society at the national, regional and international levels.

52. In the area of management, efforts were focused on rebuilding organizational capacity and fostering a culture that promotes high performance, cost-effectiveness, continuous learning and managerial excellence. In the support services, a more modern and reliable information technology infrastructure was established, and communication capacity was upgraded Organization-wide to satisfy the increase in activity, including the needs of peacekeeping operations. The Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) continued to be expanded and improved, including at the offices away from Headquarters, serving as a vehicle of profound change in carrying out administrative work.

53. The Organization’s energetic use of and adaptation to modern technology in the biennium left a pronounced positive imprint on the quality of its performance and distinguished it from the previous bienniums. By making its publications, reports, analyses and other information of importance readily available to decision makers, experts, academia and the general public through the Internet, the United Nations increased its outreach in most substantive areas, enhanced its political visibility, made its accomplishments known in detail to interested parties, and delivered its message to the widest possible audience.

54. The assessment of the ongoing efforts to carry out the Secretary-General’s programme of reform during 1998-1999 highlighted the impact it had on creating unity of purpose and coherence of efforts, and strengthening the Organization’s capacity to attain its aspirations. The establishment of the Executive Committees on Peace and Security, Humanitarian Affairs, Economic and Social Affairs, and Development Operations was a core element of the strategy to strengthen policy coherence and decision-making processes Organization-wide, in such cross-cutting issues as human rights, gender, environment and sustainable development. In the economic and social sectors, the integration of support for policy formulation, analytical and normative functions and related technical cooperation activities, brought a more effective division of labour, and a more unified, focused United Nations approach to development issues.

55. Measures related to management reforms resulted in rationalized organizational structures with sharper programmatic focus, that allowed clear delineation of responsibilities; streamlined processes and work methods that helped to increase productivity and contributed to more effective programme implementation; reduced administrative layers and paperwork that led to more transparent procedures and improved services to clients. Departments reported that these measures increased efficiency and timeliness of programme delivery, and programme managers’ accountability.

 

VI. Findings and conclusions

56. The distinguishing feature of programme performance in 1998-1999 was the overall implementation rate of 88 per cent for all mandated outputs, the highest level in the last decade. That can be viewed as one of the tangible outcomes of the resolve to promote managerial efficiency and accountability in the ongoing implementation of the Secretary-General’s reform measures. The Office of Internal Oversight Services believes that the strengthening of accountability at the level of every individual staff member through the performance planning and appraisal system, and the institutionalization of computerized programme performance monitoring and reporting systems at the departmental level, contributed to improved programme implementation. When used in concert and with determination, they enabled management at different levels of the organizational hierarchy to formulate concrete planning and performance targets, to ensure progress towards the achievement of intended goals and objectives, to detect bottlenecks, as well as to resolve problems in time.

57. The implementation rates also point to more flexibility and resourcefulness in programme management. Indeed, while implementation of mandated outputs (I1) increased by 8 percentage points to 88 per cent compared to the previous biennium, the ratio of all implemented outputs to those initially programmed (I3) increased by 9 percentage points to 105 per cent. Three departments attained implementation rates as high as 144, 146 and 172 per cent. That would point to strengthened managerial ability to respond to unforeseen programmatic demands and to mobilize resources efficiently to attain higher programme delivery.

58. The positive results notwithstanding, it is clear that performance management and monitoring require improvement. A first priority would be the application of performance measurements in assessing the achievement of stated objectives, and providing sound information on resource utilization. A structured and more informative qualitative assessment of programme performance needs to be carried out. The timing, substance and impact of the performance report as a feedback mechanism for future programme planning and budgeting should be reviewed to enhance the value it adds to overall programme performance. Best practices in performance monitoring will be studied to strengthen its use as a cogent tool of managerial decision-making by all organizational entities, including the support services; electronic-based monitoring systems that would support that goal would be further developed. Remaining redundancies and duplications would be identified and eliminated to reduce the resources consumed in the monitoring process.

59. The experience in preparing the present report revealed once again that the acceptance of and expertise in reporting on programme performance varies considerably between departments and offices. While the majority of programme managers have fully absorbed monitoring as a vital component of their managerial culture, others still have to develop full appreciation of it as a useful and effective instrument of overall programme management. That calls for a review of lingering impediments in those departments to identify the steps required to change such attitudes. The Office of Internal Oversight Services will also have to provide more intensive guidance and training support to departments and offices.

60. The above would be translated into a detailed plan of action aimed at assuring that the programme performance report for the next biennium would be more informative, more comprehensive and prepared more cost-effectively.

 

Notes

1 Official Records of the General Assembly, Fifty-fourth Session, Supplement No. 16 (A/54/16).

2 Ibid., Fifty-third Session, Supplement No. 16 (A/53/16).

 

Annex

Programme performance by section of the programme budget for the biennium 1998-1999

 

 

Section 1B. CONFERENCE SERVICES

A - NEW YORK

Selected outputs/services provided during the biennium 1998-1999

Output/service by subprogramme

Programmed

Number Provided

 

1998-1999

1998

1999

Subprogramme 1
Meeting services:
(a) Calendar meetings with interpretation

6 400

2 764

2 999

Calendar meetings without interpretation

1 800

795

865

Subtotal

8 200

3 559

3 864

(b) Non-calendar meetings with interpretation

700

415

431

Non-calendar meetings without interpretation

2 100

1 039

1 259

Subtotal

2 800

1 454

1 690

Subprogramme 2
Interpretation
Interpreter assignments:
(i) Calendar meetings

75 800

31 544

34 357

(ii) Non-calendar meetings

4 800

2 895

2 934

Total

80 600

34 439

37 291

Verbatim reporting
Meetings with verbatim records

650

306

312

Subprogramme 3
Translation services
(Thousands of words)
(a) Staff:
Arabic

31 200

14 771

15 867

Chinese

30 100

13 971

14 380

English

7 000

3 530

3 439

French

31 100

14 268

15 208

Russian

29 400

14 579

15 317

Spanish

32 400

14 005

14 959

Subtotal

161 200

75 124

79 170

 

Output/service by subprogramme

Programmed

Number Provided

 

1998-1999

1998

1999

(b) Contractual translation
Funded by Conference Services

35 000

15 165

17 811

Total (a) and (b)

196 200

90 289

96 981

(c) Contractual translation funded by other offices

4 000

119

523

(d) German (XB) (extrabudgetary)

1 860

836

858

Editorial services
(Thousands of words)
Pre-editing

31 600

19 527

20 591

Official records

90 000

26 778

40 177

Total

121 600

46 305

60 768

Subprogramme 4
Text-processing
(Thousands of words)
Staff

314 000

149 787

163 156

Contractual

46 900

24 764

27 502

Total

360 900

174 551

190 658

Reproduction
(Thousands of page impressions)
Reproduction

1347 000

523 115

517 262

Distribution
(Thousands of items processed)
Distribution

105 000

46 965

43 625

Includes work done on a reimbursable basis.

 

 

 

Section 1B. CONFERENCE SERVICES

B - GENEVA

Selected output/services provided during the biennium 1998 -1999

Output/service by subprogramme

Programmed

Number Provided

 

1998-1999

1998

1999

Subprogramme 1      
Meeting services:      
Calendar meetings with interpretation

5 400

2 395

2 191

Calendar meetings without interpretation

5 550

3 558

3 373

Subtotal

10 950

5 953

5 564

Non-calendar meetings with interpretation

450

279

468

Non-calendar meetings without interpretation

2 200

1 358

1 532

Subtotal

2 650

1 637

2 000

Subprogramme 2      
Interpretation:      
Regular Budget

49 000

21 216

19 656

Extrabudgetary

5 000

3 407

5 302

Total

54 000

24 623

24 958

Subprogramme 3      
Translation services      
Staff:      
Arabic

13 430

6 398

6 157

Chinese

12 470

6 230

6 194

English

6 710

4 191

4 075

French

23 970

11 316

11 192

Russian

22 060

11 859

12 039

Spanish

17 260

9 286

8 680

Subtotal

95 900

49 280

48 337

Contractual translation

10 800

2 985

4 560

Total

106 700

52 265

52 897

Editorial services    
Staff

21 700

9 852

15 285

Contractual  

379

822

Total

21 700

10 231

16 107

b Financial provision and management for these contractual services is made under subprogramme 1.

 

Output/service by subprogramme

Programmed

Number Provided

 

1998-1999

1998

1999

Subprogramme 4      
Text processing      
Staff:      
Arabic

21 312

10 856

9 687

Chinese

19 536

9 884

9 284

English

24 864

13 015

12 869

French

47 952

22 111

22 164

Russian

33 744

20 107

17 946

Spanish

30 192

16 770

15 646

Subtotal

177 600

92 743

87 596

Contractual /

17 700

8 231

17 161

Total

195 300

100 974

104 757

Copy preparation and proof-reading      
Pages prepared/corrected/revised

72 000

 

94 239

       
Reproduction: (thousands of page impressions)      
Regular budget

484 000

239 820

281 883

Extrabudgetary

16 000

8 388

16 979

Total

500 000

248 208

298 862

Subprogramme 5.      
Library services:      
i) Recurrent publications:      
1. Monthly Bibliography, parts 1 (books, official documents and serials) and II (selected articles)

*/

12

12

2. Weekly Bibliography

*/

52

51

3. Library News/Nouvelles de la Bibliotheque

*/

**

 
4. Contribution to the shared UNBIS database and to the annual cumulative updates of UNBIS Plus on CD-ROM and Human Rights Bibliography on CD-ROM

*/

 

28 742

ii) On-line services:      
Updating and adding bibliographical and historical information to its Internet home page, G-Net, and cc: Mail.

*/

1

1

* Not programmed in the programme budget 1998-1999.

** Suspended.

c Financial provision and management for these contractual services is made under subprogramme 1.

 

 

Section 1B. CONFERENCE SERVICES

C. VIENNA

Selected output/services provided during the biennium 1998 -1999

Output/service by subprogramme

Programmed

Number Provided

 

1998-1999

1998

1999

Subprogramme 1      
Meeting services:      
Calendar

1 433

725

1 027

Non-calendar

1 161

356

361

Total

2 594

1 081

1 388

Subprogramme 2      
Interpretation Servicesa      
United Nations

5 552

4 275

2 759

Subprogramme 3      
Translation Services      
Staff      
United Nations

19 900

8 934

11 287

Contractual      
United Nations

3 512

3 482

4 871

Total

23 412

12 416

16 158

Editorial Services      
(thousands of words)      
United Nations

5 200

2 637

3 251

Subprogramme 4      
Text processing      
(thousands of words)      
Staff      
United Nations

43 816

20 537

26 861

Contractual      
United Nations

8 093

6 130

9 946

Total

51 909

26 667

36 807

Copy preparation      
(time logged/hours)      
United Nations

7 578

4 173

5 665

Reproduction      
(thousands of page impressions)      
IAEA common printing services /

61 000

24 643

31 458

High-speed photocopying      
United Nations

15 400

7 437

8 051

Distribution      
(thousands of items)      
United Nations

4 100

1 962

2 881

a Includes loans of interpreters to other duty stations and organizations.

b Financial provision for the United Nations share of these services is made under subprogramme 5.

Section 1B. General Assembly affairs and conference services - qualitative assessment of programme perfomance

Subprogramme 1. General Assembly and Economic and Social Council affairs
Objectives To provide authoritative procedural advice and substantive services ensuring the productive work of the General Assembly; to prepare and issue in a timely manner all necessary documentation as well as reference tools on the rules of procedure of the General Assembly and its practice; to advise on the application and interpretation of the provisions of the relevant Articles of the Charter of the United Nations for inclusion in the Repertory of Practice of United Nations Organs.
Assessment criteria

Number of meetings and their efficient conduct. Timely issuance of parliamentary documentation. Accurate information and authoritative advice on the work of the General Assembly.

Major benefits realized

More than 260 plenary meetings of the General Assembly, its General Committee and relevant consultations were conducted in an orderly and procedurally correct manner. Eight high-level meetings with regional organizations were successfully conducted. All documentation came out in a timely manner, with improvements in presentation and/or contents, which ensured the efficient scheduling and work of Assembly meetings.

Subprogramme 2. Conference services – New York
Objectives To improve the local and global planning and coordination of conference services; to enhance the document information and tracking systems; and to upgrade the services’ technological capacity. To provide quality interpretation services and verbatim records of meetings. To improve the efficiency and quality of translation and editorial services and to ensure the relevant structure and calibre of human and technological resources. To provide text-processing, desktop publishing, copy preparation, reproduction, distribution, storage and electronic archiving and retrieval services for all documents and printed products.
Assessment criteria Positive feedback from clients. Compliance with deadlines; rate of self-revision; share of contractual translation jobs subjected to quality control; productivity statistics as compared with established workload standards; cost-awareness in hiring temporary assistance and in using contractual services.
Major benefits realized

The statistical reports on utilization of conference resources were computerized. A redesigned, online, electronic Documents Registration Information and Tracking System was implemented and a computerized system was also introduced to monitor the submission and issuance of the General Assembly documentation. A computer-based system was established to provide statistics on productivity of different units and sections in conference services. Coordination in utilization of document processing resources between the largest duty stations improved to involve the electronic transmission and shared processing of documents. The introduction of digitized, compressed sound recordings has reduced expenditures, while preserving the quality and timeliness of verbatim records. Translation staff had been equipped with up-to-date networked computers providing access both to in-house and Internet terminology resources, to bulletin boards for collaborative work, and to electronic file exchange with text-processing units, which resulted in cost savings and improved quality of translation. Remote servicing of meetings has become standard practice, and resulted in significant cost savings and in more efficient use of staff. Well-established procedures and the use of redundant telecommunications links have made it possible to provide timely, reliable servicing without compromising quality. More consistent editorial practices were established across all types of UN documents. Regarding terminology and reference, the main part of its UNTERM system was migrated from a mainframe to a PC-based platform and selected glossaries were made available on the Intranet. In translation services, the range and volume of terminology resources in electronic form were greatly expanded; a Computer-Assisted Translation project (automated retrieval of previously translated portions of text) was launched. Internal quality control procedures were reinforced and the proportion of contractually translated jobs subjected to quality control was significantly increased. The contractual translation base was expanded and its work-flow and contract management system improved.

Subprogramme 3. Conference services – Geneva
Objectives To ensure effective planning and servicing of meetings; to plan and implement new computer applications and to upgrade the existing ones; to process documents timely use of the appropriate mix of permanent, temporary and contractual staff and effective technology. To ensure timely and efficient reproduction, distribution and storage of documents and publications using advanced electronic information management and the expanded use of the optical disk system (ODS).
Assessment criteria

Client satisfaction with quality of services. Utilization rate of meeting resources. Timely issuance of documentation. Productivity as measured by the established workload standards. Rate of capacity utilization for interpretation resources. The percentage of self-revision. The ratio of local and non-local temporary staff.

Major benefits realized The timely redeployment of resources to service meetings convened at very short notice. In 1999, the utilization rate of conference resources was 87%, higher than the benchmark rate of 80%, reflecting both greater discipline exercised by clients and more efficient allocation of conference resources. The Electronic Meetings Display and Information System, has entered the implementation phase; daily information documents are provided both on the e-mail bulletin board and on Intranet/Internet; the Internet web site for the ODS is operational. A large-scale UNOV-UNOG remote interpretation experiment, using high-capacity digital telephone lines instead of costly satellite links, opened the way to further explore remote interpretation. Remote translation in all languages using Internet became the standard practice regarding conferences held outside Geneva. Experimental training session in speech recognition was organized for translators. The increased application of information technology, computerized page layout, print on demand and wider use of the Optical Disk System have enhanced the quality of services and reduced paper output. The review of the mailing lists has increased the efficiency of documentation distribution.
Subprogramme 4. Conference services – Vienna
Objectives To provide cost-efficient and timely meetings planning, interpretation, translation, document preparation and publishing services to substantive United Nations entities; to archive United Nations documentation, including UNIDO, onto ODS; to advance the development of the statistical/performance monitoring database; to introduce on-line the unique, six-language computer-based terminology and reference system (VINTARS); to foster the development of remote translation technologies; and to advance workload sharing with other duty stations; to improve workload forecasts through the development of on-line forms integrated into the documentation database; and to improve and implement output standards for editors, copy preparers, proof-readers and typesetters.
Assessment criteria

Customer feedback. Observance of the six-week deadline for distribution of meeting documentation. Compliance index figures reported annually to the Committee on Conferences. Increased productivity through more efficient organization, processes and technology. Better compliance of substantive departments with quality standards and deadlines.

Major benefits realized The solution to the impact of post cuts and increased workload was found in outsourcing: contractual translation workload almost doubled, illustrating that the service can expand to absorb up to 30 per cent of the workload provided that there is an adequate quality control infrastructure. This experiment in raising the level of outsourcing was successful, in part, due to the expansion of retainer agreements, sharing contractor rosters with other organizations and by working with almost all contractors on-line. In addition, contractual services expanded to include editing, copy preparation/proof-reading and typesetting. A higher rate of outsourcing also provided a high level of savings for UNOV, over $5 million for the biennium. Streamlined procedures, reduced overhead and more efficient processing resulted in the cost of one page of in-house translation decreased by 2.6 per cent in 1998 and by 11.6 per cent in 1999. The higher productivity resulted in workdays savings in translation which helped to absorb part of the 19.13 per cent increase in UN translation workload, in comparison with level projected in the 1998-1999 budget and helped to reduce drastically additional funds that had to be provided. With the increased work valued at $3,298,081, UNOV was able to absorb $1,376,381 of this cost. VINTARS is now available on-line.
Legislative review Both at its fifty-third and its fifty-fourth sessions, the Assembly underlined the importance of providing services, including interpretation, to the meetings of regional and other major groupings of Member States; it welcomed the provision of such services and regretted that not all requests for interpretation had been met. Also, in resolution 53/208 A, the Assembly requested the Secretary-General to ensure that the use of remote interpretation would not affect the quality of interpretation; and it stressed that the quality of interpretation in the six official languages should be improved. In resolution 54/248 D, the Assembly decided that the use of remote interpretation shall not constitute an alternative to the current institutionalized system of interpretation; and that the use of remote interpretation may not affect the quality of interpretation and may not in itself lead to any further reduction in language posts, nor will it affect the equal treatment of the six official languages. It also requested the Secretary-General to keep under review the introduction and use of any new technology, in particular remote interpretation. In that resolution, the General Assembly reiterated the need to maintain and enhance the quality of translations, particularly by ensuring that they reflect the specificity of each language, and expressed concern over the increase in the rate of self-revision at all duty stations.

The General Assembly commended the Secretary-General for his continued efforts to reduce the backlog in the publication of the Repertory .

External review and evaluation The Board of Auditors and OIOS conducted selective reviews of interpretation and verbatim reporting services and of the management of conference services and their recommendations are largely being implemented. Both JIU and OIOS reviewed outsourcing in the area of printing and emphasized the need to develop actively the Secretariat facilities as providers of printing services system-wide. The recommendations are being implemented.
Internal evaluation

and lessons learned

Internal output and productivity statistics are reviewed every six months to analyse fluctuations, identify trends and adjust capacity or working practices where necessary. Most activities in the Department are subject to internal quality evaluation, ranging from straightforward revision of work by senior staff and spot-check monitoring by supervisors, to peer reviews and unit discussions on performance. Numerous remarks in praise or criticism of the work of DGAACS are made throughout the year by delegations and other parties. All complaints are immediately traced to the units and staff members concerned, and corrective action is taken when necessary. Expressions of approval are similarly conveyed to the relevant units, to encourage continued quality performance.

Impact of reform

Although permanent staff resources were lower than in previous bienniums, internal restructuring, adjustments in the use of temporary assistance, contractual arrangements and technological innovations compensated for reduced resources and ensured maintenance of a satisfactory level of services.

Section 2. Political affairs - qualitative assessment of programme performance

Sub-

programmes

1. Prevention, control and resolution of conflicts. 2. Assistance and support to the Secretary-General in the political aspects of his relations with Member States 3. Electoral assistance
Objectives Strengthening the capacity of the Organization in the areas of early warning, preventive diplomacy, peace making and post-conflict peace-building. To provide the Secretary-General on a continuous basis with information, analyses and policy advice on the political aspects of his relations with Member States and with representatives of regional arrangements and organizations and civil society. To provide electoral assistance to requesting Member States through technical and advisory support. To coordinate electoral assistance activities within the United Nations system and with regional, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations. To contribute to the Organization’s efforts in preventive peace-making and post-conflict peace-building through the provision of targeted electoral assistance to requesting Member States, designed to strengthen existing national capacities.
Assessment criteria Accuracy, timeliness and quality of recommendations made to the Secretary-General and, through him, to the Security Council and the General Assembly on all matters relating to international peace and security. Feedback from the Secretary-General and, through him, from Member States on the quantity, relevance and quality of reports, briefing notes, talking points and other background papers. Improved quality and effectiveness of electoral assistance provided by the United Nations. Integration of electoral assistance in UN’s system-wide response to the needs of Member States and partner organizations. Strengthened capacity of requesting Member States to hold internationally accepted elections on a regular basis.
Major benefits realized Consistent efforts to identify potential or actual conflicts and their implications and to recommend timely preventive measures. Better preparedness on the part of the end users to seek peaceful settlement and to provide assistance to that end. Initiation of activities to address the root causes of conflict. Enhanced capacity in conducting and supporting political negotiations. Improved communications with Member States and regional organizations. Close cooperation in political matters between the Secretary-General and the Security Council, the General Assembly and other intergovernmental bodies, as well as regional and subregional organizations and civil society. Out of 48 requests by Member States for electoral assistance, 32 requests resulted in electoral assistance projects or are considered for implementation. This represents a 30% increase in the number of requests received and a 45% increase in the assistance provided as compared to the previous biennium. As a general trend, requests from Member States have become more targeted and specific to their respective needs, reflecting a stronger capacity at national levels for electoral administration. Electoral assistance has accordingly evolved into activities in support of national electoral institutions and processes. The recent trend also indicates that elections have increasingly been used as a peaceful means of national decision-making and confidence-building. More time and efforts were dedicated to harmonization and liaison, as a result of which numerous new partnerships were developed within the UN system as well as with external international and national partners. Increased participation of staff in expert symposiums and training workshops enhanced the institutional memory and professional capacity.

The initial subprogramme "5. General Assembly affairs" was transferred to the Department of General Assembly Affairs and Conference Services in the course of the reform.

 

Sub-

programmes

4. Security Council affairs 5. Decolonization 6. Question of Palestine
Objectives To provide authoritative advice and substantive support to the Security Council and its subsidiary organs; to advise the Secretary-General on their work and to provide relevant assessments and analytical studies; to prepare the Repertoire of the Practice of the Security Council and relevant sections of the Repertory of Practice of United Nations Organs and to provide advice to the Secretary-General and Member States on issues concerning the practices of the Security Council. To provide substantive support to the Special Committee on the Situation with regard to the Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples and to monitor implementation of relevant resolutions of the General Assembly To assist the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People in promoting a solution of the question of Palestine based on the exercise by the Palestinian people of its inalienable rights in accordance with all relevant United Nations resolutions.
Assessment criteria Positive evaluation by the members of the Council and other Member States, and by the Secretary-General of the quality and timeliness of the analyses and services provided. Timely submission of studies for the Repertoire and Repertory. Timely and effective provision of background information, analyses and substantive support to the Committee Feedback from the Committee members and observers and from senior officials of the United Nations Secretariat.
Major benefits realized Cooperation and interaction between the subprogramme and members of the Council and Member States continued to increase. With encouragement and substantive support from the sanctions secretariat, a number of international expert seminars were organized by several Governments, regional and non-governmental organizations with the aim of improving the design, application and management of Security Council sanctions. Reliable substantive support to 33 meetings of the Special Committee and 19 meetings of its Open-ended Bureau. Preparation of annual working papers on the political, economic and social conditions in each of the remaining 17 Non-Self Governing Territories (NSGT). Preparation of annual reports in response to General Assembly resolutions regarding NSGT. Organization of and substantial and technical support to two seminars. Substantive guidance on the creation of the Internet web site on decolonization. The Secretariat helped to increase international support for the objectives of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People as well as to heighten international awareness of the question of Palestine and the need for greater international solidarity with and assistance to the Palestinian people.
Legislative review In its resolutions, the General Assembly underlined the importance of preventive diplomacy and peacemaking as the most cost-effective ways by which the Organization could contribute to the maintenance of international peace and security; noted with appreciation the additional efforts to enhance cooperation with other organizations in facilitating more comprehensive responses to requests for electoral assistance; and noted the essential contribution of the Secretariat to the advancement of the inalienable rights of the Palestinian people.
External review and evaluation An independent external review and an in-depth evaluation by OIOS of the electoral assistance function positively assessed its cost-efficiency and recommended a number of programmatic and organizational improvements along with enhanced coordination, which are being implemented.
Internal evaluation

and lessons learned

Internal reviews focused on enhancing the efficiency and quality of output delivery in the situation of increased demand for services and prevailing resource constraints. Two comprehensive studies on lessons learned from electoral assistance led to improvements in guidelines, contingency planning and logistics
Impact of reform and restructuring The organizational streamlining through merger and consolidation helped to rectify the top-heaviness of the staffing structure and improved the productivity and efficiency of programme delivery.

 

Section 2B. Disarmament – qualitative assessment of programme performance

Objectives

Assessment criteria

Major benefits realized

1. To provide organizational and substantive secretariat support to intergovernmental, multilateral bodies in dealing with disarmament; to follow and assess current and future trends in the field of disarmament and international security; to promote disarmament expertise, particularly in developing countries; and to provide impartial and factual information on multilateral disarmament efforts. Quality and timeliness of outputs and services, as assessed by Member States, and other end users. Establishment of an environment conducive to a smooth process of negotiations and deliberations in the Conference on Disarmament (CD) and review conferences of existing multilateral disarmament agreements. Improved organizational and substantive services in the implementation of the UN Disarmament Fellowship, Training and Advisory Programme and increased political and diplomatic skills on the part of participants in serving their Governments in multilateral disarmament forums. Broadened range of recipients of timely and accurate information on disarmament issues.
2. To strengthen existing treaties on weapons of mass destruction; to support States’ negotiations, deliberations and consensus-building; to encourage universal adherence to and to promote confidence in the multilateral treaty regimes; to monitor/assess current and future trends in weapons of mass destruction; to prepare relevant analyses and briefing materials; and to expand information and foster understanding of Member States on the issues involved. Satisfaction of Member States with the quality and timeliness of outputs, services and political advice to the meetings of treaty bodies. Positive reaction to the quality of information and analysis on the issues under negotiation. Up-to-date and factual information in database. Sound organizational and substantive support provided to meetings of the Preparatory Committee for the 2000 Review Conference of States parties to Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. Enhanced interaction with the IAEA and international treaty organizations, such as the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons and the Provisional Technical Secretariat of the PrepCom of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization. More active exchange of information with academic community and NGOs. A well-developed and refined Internet web site. To foster meaningful discussions between policy makers and civil society on disarmament-related topics, two symposiums on: "De-Alerting of Nuclear Weapons" and "Missile Development and the Impact on Global Security" were organized and well received. Analytical and background materials and briefing notes were positively assessed and actively used by the recipients. Responses were provided on numerous inquiries on various issues concerning weapons of mass destruction from Member States and civil society.
3. To support the prevention of proliferation of conventional arms; to assist in developing and implementing measures of practical disarmament; to identify emerging issues and challenges; and to operate and maintain the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms and the standardized system for the annual reporting of military expenditures. More frequent requests by Member States for assistance in developing strategies for practical disarmament. Endorsement by the General Assembly of substantive studies and reports. Effective maintenance of the reporting instruments. Increased awareness of the issue of small arms at the international, governmental and non-governmental levels. For the first time ever, the Security Council has targeted the issue of small arms. Better policy co-ordination throughout the UN system. Better understanding of relationship between disarmament and development, and of implications of emerging issues and challenges for the role of the UN in the maintenance of international peace and security. Enhanced field experience on weapons collection programmes and development of "weapons for development" strategies.
4. To provide impartial, factual information on UN disarmament efforts to Member States, treaty bodies and civil society; to deepen their understanding of the importance of multilateral action; to support the implementation of the Mine-Ban Convention with regard to article 7 on transparency measures, and to provide expert advice to the Secretary-General. Timely and accurate information provided. Sound, well-substantiated analyses and policy advice. A well-developed web site for reporting under the Mine-Ban Convention. Easier access to data and availability of more up-to-date data; high-quality advice to the Secretary-General through focused discussion in the Advisory Board; transparency in implementation of the Mine-Ban Convention. Greater emphasis in the information programme has been given to electronic products and to exchanges of view through seminars and workshops. As a result of numerous requests for information, a newsletter was instituted in late 1998 and three issues were produced by the end of 1999. Collaboration was strengthened with the research community. The web site on transparency measures under the mine-ban Convention was well received by users.
5. To support regional and subregional organizations in translating globally agreed measures, guidelines and principles into regional approaches towards strengthening international peace and security; to promote and support regional initiatives in increasing openness and transparency in military matters, promoting confidence-building, concluding arms limitation and disarmament agreements as a means of preventing new crises and conflicts; to provide a regional forum for high-level but informal exchange of ideas and initiatives as a means of finding common ground and identifying areas of possible future negotiations and agreements by interested Member States with regard to arms limitation and disarmament; and to support the United Nations Standing Advisory Committee on Security Questions in Central Africa. International support to the initiatives undertaken by regional centres towards promoting disarmament, peace and security in their respective regions. Satisfaction of the United Nations Standing Advisory Committee on Security Questions in Central Africa with the quality advice, organizational and administrative services the Committee has received in implementing its programme of work. Increased cooperation and collaboration between the regional centres and various regional and subregional organizations and NGOs in their respective regions. Increased exchange of information with regional and subregional organizations. Increased public awareness of the United Nations disarmament programme in various regions. Establishment of an early warning mechanism and the creation of a mechanism (Council for Peace and Security in Central Africa) for the promotion, maintenance and consolidation of peace and security in Central Africa by the member States of the United Nations Standing Advisory Committee. Increased requests to the regional centres for assistance in organizing regional and subregional conferences, seminars, workshops and training on disarmament matters; and for technical advice on the collection and disposal of small arms and light weapons.
 
Legislative review Appreciation was expressed at the Conference on Disarmament and the review conferences for the substantive and administrative support provided by the Secretariat, which contributed to the attainment of the objectives of the intergovernmental bodies. General Assembly resolution 53/77 E on small arms underlined the importance of the establishment of the Coordinating Action on Small Arms. Resolution 53/77B welcomed the efforts of the Secretary-General in assisting States in curbing the illicit traffic in small arms and collecting them. Likewise, resolution 53/77M encouraged Member States to support the Secretary-General’s efforts in responding to requests by Member States in developing measures of practical disarmament. General Assembly resolution 53/78 E, on the Disarmament Information Programme, commended the Secretary-General for his efforts to make effective use of limited resources and stressed the importance of the Programme. Resolution 54/49, on information security, welcomed the timely initiative of the Secretariat and UNIDIR in convening a meeting of experts on the subject. General Assembly resolution 54/55 E, on regional centres, reaffirmed the importance of regional centres in promoting regional peace and security. General Assembly resolution 54/55A, on regional confidence-building measures welcomed the creation of a mechanism for the promotion, maintenance and consolidation of peace and security in Central Africa by the member States of the United Nations Standing Advisory Committee.
External review and evaluation The recent in-depth evaluation of the disarmament programme by OIOS concluded that delegations are generally satisfied with the secretariat support to multilateral bodies and pointed out that the detected shortcomings are partly, although not entirely, related to the decrease in resources, especially extrabudgetary, allocated to the programme since 1992, whereas established legislative priorities remained pressing and additional tasks have been mandated. OIOS recommended more active fund-raising for extrabudgetary funds, specific measures to enhance the exchange of information related to multilateral treaties, improve cooperation in research, and strengthen collaboration with regional organizations. The recommended measures are energetically implemented.
Internal evaluation

and lessons learned

The Department has learned from and adapted to new and growing challenges and is promoting field operations as it learns from experience. Internal reviews were focused, inter alia, on greater cross-fertilization amongst all DDA branches, at enhancing staff members’ exposure to issues other than those of immediate concern to their own branches. The internal assessment concluded that the Internet web site offers the cheapest and quickest method of disseminating information to end users and should be exploited as fully as possible.
Impact of reform and restructuring The re-establishment of the DDA has facilitated more direct and more efficient lines of communication with the Secretary-General on disarmament, which is one of the priority areas of the UN. The same is true as regards the lines of communication within the Department and between Headquarters and the Geneva Branch. The new organizational structure is a better reflection of the Department’s priority areas, thus allowing a clearer delineation of responsibilities. It has rendered the Department more cohesive organizationally, streamlining reporting and enhancing accountability within the Department. This has greatly contributed to the effective implementation of the programme. The revitalization of the Lima and LomJ Regional Centres has not yet been matched with the necessary resources to make them more effective.

 

Section 3. Peacekeeping operations and special missions – qualitative assessment of programme performance

 

 

Subprogrammes

1. Executive direction and policy 2. Operations
Objectives

 

 

 

 

 

To provide in-depth research and analysis of emerging policy questions related to peacekeeping;

To enhance the military expertise in the planning and conduct of peacekeeping operations;

To provide daily situation reports and various analyses on peacekeeping issues to other departments and Member States.

To serve as the executive arm of the Secretary-General in the direction and control of peacekeeping operations;

To develop operational plans for peacekeeping operations, involving military, police and civilian components;

To maintain sustained contact with the parties to conflict, members of the Security Council and troop contributors in the implementation of legislative mandates.

Assessment criteria

 

 

 

 

 

The provision of relevant and practicable policy advice to the Secretary-General, senior managers and, where appropriate, to intergovernmental bodies;

The provision of appropriate and timely military and civilian police advice and planning inputs.

Timely and full collection of relevant information from the field and its dissemination to those concerned at Headquarters.

Soundness, timeliness and quality of daily guidance, advice and information to peacekeeping operations in the field;

Timely development of multidimensional plans for peacekeeping operations through coordination with all those concerned;

Timely and accurate reporting and provision of the Secretary-General’s recommendations on peacekeeping operations to the Security Council, General Assembly, troop contributors, etc.

Major benefits realized

 

 

 

 

 

Clear and meaningful advice, including the elaboration of options where appropriate, on the basis of which coherent and consistent policies can be developed.

Clearly understood advice and operationally effective plans;

Those with a ‘need to know’ are kept fully informed of all developments in the field; Headquarters and field personnel are able to communicate with one another 24 hours a day.

Effective implementation of Security Council mandates;

Preparedness on the part of the UN for the deployment of peacekeeping operations, in particular multidimensional peacekeeping operations, leading to the timely deployment and effective implementation of those operations;

Thorough understanding on the part of the Security Council, General Assembly, troop contributors, etc., of conflict situations, the conditions under which peacekeeping operations implement their mandates and the status of the implementation of those mandates, leading to optimal response by these bodies to conflict situations.

Internal review and impact of reform and restructuring The Lessons Learned Unit (former subprogramme 4) was integrated into the Policy and Analysis Unit, under the direct supervision of the Under-Secretary-General. This will consolidate the process within which policies are adapted or developed on the basis of, inter alia, the lessons of experience. The Situation Centre, formerly under subprogramme 1, was consolidated with the Office of Operations.
Subprogrammes 3. Field administration and logistics support 4. Planning
Objectives  

To ensure administrative and logistics support to peacekeeping operations and other United Nations-mandated activities in the field.

To provide overall planning and coordination of civilian police, demining and training activities; overall planning and coordination of all mine action-related activities.

 

 

Assessment criteria

 

Timely provision of adequate financial and human resources and delivery of goods and administrative and logistic services and support to the substantive, military, CivPol and other components of the mandated field operations at all stages of their existence – from planning and deployment to withdrawal and liquidation.

Increased military and civilian police training levels in Member States; increased participation in the standby arrangements system and enhanced capacity to deploy military and civilian police personnel in the field; a co-ordinated response by the UN system and key partners to the landmine problem through effective priority setting, programme initiation, programme support, and implementation of lessons learned; co-ordination of effective mine action support to UN peacekeeping and humanitarian operations as well as in response to emergency situations.
Major benefits realized  

The Field Administration and Logistics Division effectively prepared and implemented, as mandated, plans for deployment/expansion of 12 field operations during 1998-1999, provided support to about 30 ongoing peacekeeping and other field operations and offices, and managed liquidation of 6 field missions in the mission area, and 8 field missions at Headquarters. As a result of the implementation of the plan of upgrading all computer equipment and systems for year 2000 compliance, no field mission encountered any difficulty at the time of roll-over.

Enhanced readiness to deploy quickly in support of UN peacekeeping operations; enhanced prioritisation and application of operational resources; effective contingency planning and co-ordinated responses to emergency situations.

 

 

 

 

 

Internal review and impact of reform and restructuring DPKO absorbed the responsibility for all mine-related activities (initially under Subprogramme 4) and established the Mine Action Service which was combined with a new subprogramme 3, Field administration, logistics support and mine action. As a result of the restructuring of DPKO, military and civilian police expertise were consolidated under a new subprogramme 4, Military and civilian police advice and planning.
External review and evaluation The review of the status of implementation of earlier OIOS recommendations concluded that DPKO had made concerted efforts to formulate and apply lessons learned from its wide experience, to improve and strengthen all components of the start-up and termination phases, and to invigorate the public information activities. However, delays were noted in creating an archive of the mission standard operating procedures. In addition, numerous external and internal audit reports dealt with specific issues of administrative, financial and personnel management, logistics and procurement. Progress in implementing relevant recommendations is reported annually to the General Assembly.

 

Section 4. Peaceful uses of outer space – qualitative assessment of programme performance

Objectives

Assessment criteria

Major benefits realized

1. To provide Member States and space-related governmental and non-governmental organizations with information, expertise and other requirements necessary for expanding international co-operation in the peaceful uses of outer space and contributing to the development of international space law. Increased opportunities to expand international cooperation in space activities, through the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, with inputs from space-related international organizations and industry. The Third United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UNISPACE III) adopted the Vienna Declaration, which outlines the strategy to address global challenges through international cooperation in the peaceful uses of space science and technology such as in: i) protection of the Earth’s environment and management of natural resources; ii) enhancement of human security, development and welfare; iii) advancement of scientific knowledge of space and protection of the space environment; and iv) enhancement of education and training opportunities. UNISPACE III recommended specific priority actions in this regard, which took into account inputs from space-related NGOs and industry and from young professionals and students. The Office maintained the public register of information furnished in accordance with article IV of the Convention on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space and disseminated such information to Member States in a timely manner.
2. To strengthen the national and regional capacities of developing countries in the applications of space technology and to enhance cooperation between developed and developing countries in space science and technology. Increased opportunities for experts and the policy and decision makers from developing countries to learn about the practical benefits of the latest applications of space science and technology for socio-economic development and to integrate space science and technology in the ongoing national and regional efforts to promote socio-economic development. Provided short-term training and capacity-building under the United Nations Programme on Space Applications, as well as longer training at the regional Centres for Space Science and Technology Education affiliated to the United Nations. The Centre for Asia and the Pacific provided six nine-month training courses on such subjects as remote sensing and geographic information systems, satellite communications and meteorology, and space and atmospheric sciences. Similar centres were established in Nigeria and Morocco for training in English and French, respectively, for African countries. Another regional centre in Latin America and the Caribbean and the Network of Space Science and Technology Education and Research Institutions for Central-Eastern and South-Eastern Europe are prepared to become operational in 2000. Pilot projects were initiated to introduce the use of Earth observation satellite data into resource management in Latin America and the Caribbean, and into the university curricula in Africa, and to establish an astronomical observatory in Jordan. The workshops, conferences and symposia were held to promote international understanding of the usefulness of space science and technology for socio-economic development. Of particular importance were the regional preparatory conferences for UNISPACE III, which provided opportunities for national policy makers to identify priority areas of space applications that can contribute to economic and social development of their countries.
3. To further the understanding of the international community of ongoing space activities and the role of space technology in economic and social development. Organization of activities for the public and wide-reaching and up-to-date public information through print and electronic media, including the Internet home page, on the ongoing and planned space activities, latest scientific and technological developments and their socio-economic implications. During UNISPACE III, numerous events were organized for experts and the general public. More than 1,600 individuals, in addition to official delegates, participated in more than 30 workshops and seminars on space-related topics held within the framework of the Technical Forum of the Conference. About 160 young people from 60 countries discussed their visions for future space activities at the Space Generation Forum, organized by and for young professionals and university students. Results and proceedings of UNISPACE III were made widely available in publications and reflected in the Internet home page of the Office.

 

4. To increase the use of space technology within the Organization. Initiatives taken by United Nations bodies and specialized agencies to use space science and technology for sustainable development. Several United Nations organizations and agencies, which were partners in the Integrated Global Observing Strategy (IGOS), participated in UNISPACE III. The IGOS Partnership provides an overarching strategy for Earth observation and global monitoring, enhances scientific understanding at the national, regional and international levels, and assists user groups and decision makers, in particular those from developing countries. It will play a key role in follow-up on UNISPACE III. Assistance was provided to UNDCP in developing a space monitoring component of the Illicit Crops Monitoring Programme.
Legislative review The General Assembly commended efforts to organize UNISPACE III within existing resources; recognized the contribution of the Technical Forum and the Space Generation Forum to its success; and expressed its satisfaction with the Conference’s outcomes. The Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space expressed its appreciation for the efficient implementation of the United Nations Programme on Space Applications within the limited funds available; noted with satisfaction that the Office for Outer Space Affairs had continued to develop a World Wide Web home page, including both information sources within the United Nations system and access to external databases; and noted with satisfaction detailed information on the space-related activities being undertaken or planned through inter-agency coordination and cooperation.
External review and evaluation The Office activities received continuous and consistently positive feedback from Member States, space agencies and space-related international organizations. This encouraging reaction and the high motivation of the staff to ensure the successful preparations for and servicing of UNISPACE III allowed producing more outputs than were programmed.
Internal evaluation

and lessons learned

Internal evaluations recognized the shortage of regular-budget resources for delivering the outputs programmed and indicated that the Office cannot expect to maintain the performance level achieved in 1998-1999 without ensuring the resources required, particularly for follow-up activities of UNISPACE III.
Impact of reform and restructuring As part of the reform action aimed at fostering electronic United Nations, the Office expanded its Internet capacity in order to enhance International Space Information Services and to energize dialogues with space agencies and space-related international organizations in planning and implementing training activities and technical advisory services. At the same time, budget reductions in the area of conference services resulted in delays in the distribution of some documents for the upcoming sessions of intergovernmental bodies and limited availability of sufficient copies for distribution of important publications.

 

 

 

 

Section 6. Legal affairs – qualitative assessment of programme performance

Sub-programmes 1. Overall direction, management and coordination of legal advice and services to the United Nations as a whole 2. General legal services to United Nations organs and programmes 3. Progressive development and codification of international law
Objectives Comprehensive legal support to substantive and operational activities, to upholding the UN privileges and immunities and ensuring the procedural integrity of the work of the intergovernmental bodies. Protection of the Organization’s legal interests while minimizing risk of financial liability; representation before the Administrative Tribunal and in national judicial and administrative organs; ensuring compliance with the established legislative and administrative norms. Support to the development, codification and acceptance of international law; substantive and procedural assistance and advice to UN bodies.
Assessment criteria Quantity and quality of the legal advice and assistance. Timely and effective provision of legal services. Effective substantive and secretariat support to intergovernmental deliberations.
Major benefits realized Successful representation in the International Court of Justice with respect to immunity of special rapporteur; the lead role in the transfer of the suspects in the Lockerbie case; significant contribution to the implementation of Security Council and General Assembly resolutions. Key role in the establishment of the legal and legislative frameworks for the missions in Kosovo and East Timor and in assisting Cambodia in prosecuting suspects in violations of international humanitarian law. Also, 6,129 written legal advice provided concerning political and peacekeeping activities, the activities of the principal and subsidiary organs of the United Nations; on various issues of public international law and other crucial legal matters. Savings of US$82 million were realized through successful defense of the Organization; settling of commercial claims, etc. Standard contracts and general conditions were developed and improved. Legal assistance/advice on 8,731 formal written requests were provided concerning substantial agreements, contracts, insurance matters, copyright and taxation questions; regarding the minimization of claims against the Organization; concerning administrative matters, personnel, financial and pension questions, etc. Assisting in the reform of the Organization’s administrative issuances and in the adoption of new policy on family support obligations of staff members; developing new modality of cooperation with NGOs, IGO’s and private sectors; providing assistance in the pursuit of fraud and recovery of assets. Essential contribution to the adoption of the Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC), as well as to drafting other pending legal instruments. Assistance to the General Assembly in considering the status of relevant instruments, measures to enhance accession to or compliance with them. Provided training in international law for junior legal professionals, in particular from the developing countries. Eliminating backlog in the issuance of the UN legal publications; issuing three ad hoc publications on public international law. Expanding the United Nations audio-visual library in international law. Updating three websites on international law.
 

 

Sub-

programmes

4. Law of the sea and ocean affairs 5. Progressive harmonization and unification of the law of international trade
Objectives Strengthening the established legal order for oceans and seas; promoting understanding, acceptance, consistent application and effective implementation of the Law of the Sea Convention and its related agreements. To develop texts that facilitate international trade; assist in negotiating transactions and foster good practices; to provide legislative assistance to Governments; to coordinate the work of relevant international organizations; and to promote uniform interpretation of harmonized texts on international trade law.
Assessment criteria Feedback from the target clients as reflected in legislative actions. Effective support to intergovernmental bodies and end users; consistency of legal texts formulated by various agencies; comprehensive information on judicial interpretations of trade law.
Major benefits realized An increase in the number of ratifications and accessions to the Convention and the two related Agreements as well as enhanced compliance with the provisions of the Convention, especially regarding the establishment of the outer limits of maritime zones, and strengthened contribution to the maintenance of peace and to the management of marine affairs. Major progress in the finalizing of a number of legal guides, accords and rules. Practical assistance to over 40 States regarding relevant legislation. Coordinating the work of some 30 international organizations to ensure its consistency and uniformity. Seminars organized for trade law officials. Publishing a total of 104 abstracts of rulings interpreting texts of the Commission on International Trade Law.

 

 
Subprogramme 6. Custody, registration and publication of treaties
Objectives 1. Receive, process and record treaties and other international agreements pursuant to Art. 102. 2. To prepare treaties for publication in the United Nations Treaty Series (UNTS) pursuant to Art. 102. 3. To serve as depositary of multilateral treaties and publish the Multilateral Treaties Deposited with the Secretary-General (MTDSG). 4. To prepare the Cumulative Index 5. To provide legal opinions and advice on treaty law and practice.
Assessment criteria Prompt analysis, registration and recording of treaties; treaty-related information is readily available to clients. Ensure that all treaties are promptly available to the public on paper and through the Internet. One-day processing of new actions; prompt updating of the Member States on relevant new formalities and actions. Efficient assistance, especially regarding final clauses. Increased rate of production by using the new database. Competent advice to diverse clientele, especially on the drafting of final clauses of treaties to avoid errors in their future implementation.
Major benefits realized The new database and management reform allowed the monthly statement of treaties recorded in a given month to be issued in the next month, compared to the delay of some 22 months in 1996. This improved the production of other related publications, which are now available on the Internet. By an extensive streamlining, the production of UNTS volumes has increased threefold: from 80 in 1996-1997 to 246 in 1998-1999. All printed UNTS volumes (currently 1623) are now placed on the Internet. The new database and the workflow streamlining allowed depositary actions except those requiring analysis and translation, including notifications, to be finalized on the same day. MTDSG (annual publication) for 1999 was published for the first time one month after the year-end instead of 5 to 6 months as was previously the case. It is updated regularly on the Internet. A new prototype is now created directly from the central database, thus eliminating several compilation steps and allowing the Index to be issued instantly after the volumes are published. Increased number of consultations on various issues of international treaty law and practice. Assistance was provided with a number of treaties negotiated and concluded in 1999, especially environment-related treaties.
Legislative review In its resolutions, the General Assembly expressed appreciation for the work in the area of oceans and the law of the sea; commended the progress made in specific areas of trade law and related training and technical assistance; appreciated the dissemination of treaty publications on the Internet; and welcomed progress made in eliminating the backlog in the publication of the UN Treaty Series.
External review and evaluation Two comprehensive audits of the work on major contracts and arbitration and claims cases, as well as the selection of law firms to represent the UN in such cases and the appointment of arbitrators generally approved of the OLA performance, positively assessed efforts to enhance efficiency and endorsed the handling of contractual, arbitration and claims cases. Draft texts on the trade law are regularly exposed to assessment by interested international organizations and professional associations with a view to obtaining comments. The earlier audit recommendations concerning the publication of treaties were acted upon during the biennium and resulted in significant improvements in productivity and timeliness.
Internal evaluation and lessons learned The individual productivity and performance of the OLA staff is rigorously assessed within the PAS process. The staff has been more closely involved in planning activities and management has maintained open channels of communication to be able to measure progress and identify problems. Statistics are compiled on a monthly basis on the outputs of its Divisions and Sections. The services to intergovernmental bodies and the results achieved were regularly evaluated in meetings following each session that the Division serviced. Throughout the biennium, OLA identified and documented numerous lessons learned for both itself and the entities it serves, and the appropriate changes were instituted, such as revisions to the general conditions for contracts and development and refinement of model contracts. A self-evaluation in the area of the law of the sea identified the need for strengthening the integrated approach to ocean affairs; in particular in the context of the holistic view of the oceans embodied in the Convention and the consequent imperatives of international coordination and cooperation.
Impact of the United Nations reform and restructuring In the context of the zero-growth budgeting, OLA took necessary measures to enhance its productivity in order to cope effectively with the increased workload. An appropriate re-orientation of specific subprogrammes, streamlining of processes and workflows and the introduction of new technologies resulted in an enhanced efficiency.

Section 7A. Economic and social affairs – qualitative assessment of programme performance

Subprogrammes

Objectives

Assessment criteria

Major benefits realized

1. Policy coordination and inter-agency cooperation 1. To strengthen the ECOSOC policy coordination and guidance capacity; to enhance consensus building and effectiveness of the General Assembly deliberations. Timely and effective support to the Council and the Assembly; efficient implementation of policy directives in development cooperation. More energetic work of ECOSOC; its closer relationship with Bretton Woods institutions. Acceptance of action-oriented recommendations on the cross-cutting themes of poverty, employment and gender. Bringing globalization issues into the focus of the General Assembly debates. Closer links between functional commissions and in-depth consideration of their reports by the Council.
2. To foster cooperation on seminal issues in the Secretariat and system-wide; to enhance the impact of operational activities for development; to promote relationships with relevant NGOs. Improved coordination mechanisms. Effective measures to strengthen the impact of operational activities. Number and timeliness of NGOs accreditation, their enhanced participation in UN processes. Improved interaction of ECOSOC with governing bodies of specialized organizations/agencies and its enhanced policy guidance. Strengthened coordination mechanisms for system-wide operational activities. An increase in and timely processing of NGO accreditations; launching a comprehensive NGO database; wider information outreach, including through a web site; galvanizing NGOs to coalesce around topics of interest to ECOSOC and fostering their participation in its work.
2. Advancement of women 1.To promote system-wide gender mainstreaming and pertinent intergovernmental debates; to monitor women’s enjoyment of human rights and support international anti-discrimination mechanisms; to follow up on Beijing Platform for Action and prepare the special session Beijing+5. Demonstrable gender mainstreaming. Quantity and quality of relevant services and materials. Number of reports, submissions and individual cases under international legal instruments effectively processed and considered. Timely and effective inputs into implementing the Platform for Action and preparing the special session. Acceptance of comprehensive gender mainstreaming within the Secretariat, system-wide and in intergovernmental bodies. Produced studies on gender analysis impact, gender focal points, and relevant training materials. Enhanced monitoring of the human rights aspect. Increased accessions to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women. Substantive support to the adoption of the Optional Protocol to the Convention. Prepared the 1999 World Survey on the Role of Women in Development; assessed the implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action, and conducted the review of the system-wide medium-term plan for the advancement of women. Provided background papers to facilitate preparations for the special session of the General Assembly.
2. To provide gender advisory services and foster information exchange with Government and civil society; to achieve the 50/50 gender balance in the staffing of all Professional and higher-level posts in the Secretariat. Quantity and quality of services provided to requesting countries. The frequency, content and impact of information exchanges. Increase in proportion of women in the target posts. Effective gender advisory services to developing countries; training in and advice on follow-up on the African Platform of Action for the advancement of women. Stronger collaboration with UN coordinating bodies and with a network of NGOs. Launched an information system for the Platform for Action; organized on-line discussions on seminal issues. Special measures for the recruitment, promotion and placement of women in the Secretariat were strengthened; a framework for action plans for gender balance in individual departments/offices was established.
3. Social development 1.To promote international legal instruments, norms and action plans on social development, disabled persons, youth, ageing, family, and eradication of poverty. Impact on national policies; progress in negotiating international norms. Effective system-wide coordination. Focused advocacy, networking and research. Heightened visibility for the various dimensions of social development in national policies and in international institutions; increased attention to specific goal-oriented measures; facilitation of support to marginalized and vulnerable social groups; increased participation of these groups in decision making processes.
2. To enable the international response to critical social and economic problems; to strengthen the social development capacities of developing countries and those with economies in transition. Effective monitoring of trends; policy analysis and advice on persistent and emerging problems. Development and dissemination of timely, comprehensive and accurate information on relevant issues. Effective data collection, research and policy analysis contributed to the strengthening of Governments’ capacities to formulate, implement and evaluate social policies and programmes. Technical assistance and training resulted in immediate and sustainable enhancements of national competence and expertise in specific areas in target countries.
4. Sustainable development To support implementation of Agenda 21, outcomes of the UN conferences, programmes of action and intergovernmental decisions regarding environment, sustainable development, new and renewable sources of energy, and natural resources. Cogent coordination of implementing activities; effective support to intergovernmental mechanisms; stronger commitment by major stakeholders to strategies, policy goals and practical measures; viable outreach to and feedback from the decision makers and civil society. Major outreach activities at international/regional levels, including civil society and private sector; innovative stakeholder and expert group meetings, and regional consultations on various aspects of sustainable development and the implementation of Agenda 21. Policy advice on pertinent strategies, including a compendium of innovative policies to promote sustainable production/consumption. Adoption of an international work programme on sustainable tourism and revised guidelines on consumer protection. Supported intergovernmental dialogue on poverty issues and wide-reaching consensus building to advance a complex policy debates on forests. Targeted technical assistance on the sustainable use of energy and water resources.
5. Statistics To serve as a global centre for the collection, standardization, analysis and dissemination of economic/social data; to support countries in adopting the 1993 System of National Accounts (SNA); to promote integrated environmental and economic accounting, sustainable development indicators and integrated sets of social statistics; to coordinate the statistical work of international agencies. Improved geographical coverage and timeliness of collected statistics.

Expansion of SNA to more countries and technical support to them in implementing it. Practical guidance and training on integrated environmental and economic accounting and implementing consistent and integrated social statistics. Effective measures to coordinate and harmonize statistical activities of international organizations and agencies.

Increased the country coverage to 260 new country periods and improved timeliness of the data in the international commodity trade statistics database; revised the concepts and definitions of international trade statistics and promoted their implementation through regional workshops in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Caribbean; made accessible the beta version of UNYSIS via the Intranet. Provided direct support to developing countries in more fully implementing the SNA system and facilitated its computerization. Prepared a manual on integrating environmental and economic accounting, supported by training for developing countries. Produced manuals on the conduct of population and housing censuses; and developed regional, self-reliant networks in Central Asia, Africa and the small islands in the Pacific for production and analysis of integrated sets of social statistics. Provided leadership in revitalizing the international classification and fostering its common usage through the use of on-line help and interpretation systems.
6. Population To provide information/analyses of population trends and policies, to enhance national policy-making capacity; to follow up on ICPD Programme of Action; to study factors affecting components of population growth; to increase awareness of emerging issues. New/critical issues are identified and brought to international attention. Accurate and timely population information, analyses and policy advice are reflected in the national plans and programmes of the major stakeholders. A number of authoritative analytical studies strengthened the capacities of national Governments and international agencies to implement programmes and policies. The body of essential and widely disseminated data and information was enhanced by the 1998 revision of the United Nations population estimates and projections, analyses of contraceptive use, a database on global review and inventory of population policies, databases on mortality, fertility, contraception, migration and population levels and trends; and through the expanded POPIN web site. Expert group meetings were organized on such critical issues as HIV/AIDS and below replacement fertility.
7. Global development trends, issues and policies To promote development and economic cooperation by exploring national and international policy options; to assist Governments in their consideration of issues pertaining to the financing of development; to contribute to economic policy-making at the national and international levels and provide assistance to Member States and intergovernmental bodies in the early identification of new and emerging issues in the world economy. The analyses and proposals made by the Secretariat are accepted and acted upon by Governments as a result of the quality, timeliness and effective dissemination of the outputs. Progress made towards the realization of a high-level international intergovernmental event on financing for development. Accuracy of forecasts and outlooks to make them a useful purpose for policy makers, inter-governmental bodies, other Secretariat units and the civil society. The turbulence in international financial markets and the slowdown in the world economy were in the focus of the 1998 World Economic and Social Survey, the study entitled Global Turmoil and Reform, and substantive inputs to discussions at the High-level Meetings of ECOSOC and the Bretton Woods institutions. Meetings on financing for development, involving representatives of academia, the private sector and the civil society were organized; a report prepared on the views of stakeholders; a web site on Financing for Development launched. The reports of the Secretary-General on global financial issues and net financial transfers led the General Assembly to the adoption of a consensus. The World Economic and Social Survey and the joint DESA/UNCTAD report became the primary vehicles for disseminating the Secretariat’s views on the global economic outlook. DESA’s forecast that the global financial scare in the fall of 1998 was not going to lead to a global collapse proved to be accurate. Participation in the meetings of Project LINK was broadened and reporting on it improved, including through a web site.
8. Public economics and public administration To assist in intergovernmental debates on common approaches to critical issues of public economics and administration; to provide information and policy-oriented analysis on the role of the State and market mechanisms in national efforts to foster economic growth. To support government efforts to establish rational tax systems and sound financial administration. To respond to requests from Governments for information, methodologies, assessments and policy proposals regarding the linkage between political and economic issues and policies, with particular emphasis on the economic and social impact of UN imposed sanctions. Efficient delivery of substantive inputs to intergovernmental bodies; effective organization of expert meetings; positive feedback on analytical studies. Enhanced awareness by policy-makers of appropriate policies and institutional frameworks to improve economic governance; productive exchange of national best practices in public administration and finance. Achieving common approach to the issues of international tax matters; tax administration, and public financial management. Detailed understanding by the Security Council and the General Assembly of the economic and social effects of economic sanctions. Extensive briefings of policy-makers; increased interaction among public officials, practitioners, experts and civil society on strategies and methodologies. Increased awareness in intergovernmental bodies of the pivotal role that institutional and managerial capacities play in economic and social development. Providing support to reaching a consensus on the drafting of an African Charter and Code of Conduct of Civil Service. Expert meetings and publications fostered exchange of information and experiences. The South/South Centre for Exchange and Innovation in Public Administration and a clearing house for Central and Eastern Europe and the CIS on professionalism and ethics for public services were established; developed governance programme in Liberia. The revised version of the Model Convention on International Tax Treaties was agreed upon. Contributed to the successful registration of bilateral tax treaties between developing countries. Developed Guidelines for Effective Financial Management, which was well received. Presented the General Assembly with a methodology to assess the economic and social impact of economic sanctions.
Legislative review On a number of substantive items, the General Assembly took note with appreciation of the work of the Secretariat. The Department contributed to the substantive content of resolutions/decisions adopted by the Assembly and other intergovernmental bodies on the crucial issues of the socio-economic agenda.
Internal evaluation The extensive internal training at the outset of the biennium enabled staff that has been exposed to different work experiences and methods of operation in the three predecessor departments to share accumulated knowledge and experience. New coordination methods were put in place to undergird the substantive follow-up to United Nations conferences; cross-divisional networks were established on multidisciplinary themes. Efforts are under way to strengthen the country-level and impact evaluations of operational activities. The need to absorb unforeseen and unresourced additional workload associated with various substantive areas led to internal reorganizations aimed at enhancing efficiency and strengthening synergies.
External review and evaluation In its in-depth evaluation, OIOS noted that collaboration between programme areas improved since the Department was established; emphasized that the subprogramme on the advancement of women was made the centre of innovation attracting an intense interest of the civil society; noted enhanced collaboration of DESA with specialized organizations and agencies, and that promotion and distribution of DESA publications improved. OIOS recommended strengthening the interaction between the analytical functions and operational activities; improving the inter-Secretariat exchange of ideas and information; developing an informal network of experts to assist in disseminating United Nations economic and social analysis; and introducing more effective and innovative arrangements for the dissemination of analyses in print and electronic form. Ongoing feedback is also obtained from the major stakeholders in and the end-users of substantive inputs and operational/field projects and is reflected in the design and implementation of future activities.
Impact of the United Nations reform The consolidation and restructuring of socio-economic area enhanced policy and programme coherence in support of legislative bodies and strengthened the overall direction and coordination function of the Executive Committee on Economic and Social affairs, for which DESA serves as the convenor. The integration of support for policy formulation, analytical and normative functions and pertinent technical cooperation activities served to rationalize and strengthen competencies in the economic and social fields, eliminate overlapping and fragmentation of skills and to create the necessary synergy in programme delivery. It brought about a more effective division of labor and a more focused presentation of the United Nations perspective on the world economic situation and prospects. The restructuring led to a more holistic approach to addressing developmental challenges. Overall, the combination of increased outputs with reduced inputs points to an increase in the efficiency of programme delivery during the biennium.

Section 8. Africa: New Agenda for Development – qualitative assessment of programme performance

Subprogramme 1. Mobilizing international support and global coordination
Objectives - To mobilize international support for African development by promoting the implementation of the UN-NADAF and related programmes such as the System-wide Special Initiative on Africa (UNSIA), the Tokyo Agenda for Action, the recommendations contained in the Secretary-General’s 1998 report to the Security Council and the General Assembly;

- To facilitate the deliberative political processes on African development and strengthen dialogue between development partners including NGOs;

- To provide support to the Secretary-General’s advocacy and policy initiatives on Africa and play a catalytic and coordinating role within the United Nations system.

Assessment criteria

Timely and effective support to the General Assembly, ECOSOC, CPC and ad hoc bodies; effective monitoring of trends; efficient coordination; participation of civil society; quality of inputs to intergovernmental bodies; quantity and quality of services provided to Governments, United Nations entities, governmental and non-governmental organizations.

Major benefits realized

It was ensured that African economic recovery and development remain a top priority item on the agenda of the main bodies of the United Nations and the international community as a whole. Significant contribution was made to reinforcing the need and urgency for reducing and arresting the decline in resource flows to Africa and for reversing this trend. The participation of African civil society in the global political processes, mostly when they relate to Africa, was enhanced and its confidence in becoming proactive was reinforced. The subprogramme has been catalytic to a number of initiatives on Africa.

Subprogramme 2. Monitoring, assessment and follow-up to the implementation of action programmes for African development
Objectives To strengthen coordination and harmonization, at the regional level, of the contribution of various United Nations organizations to the implementation of the New Agenda; to monitor and follow up the implementation of the various measures contained in the New Agenda, the System-wide Plan of Action for African Economic Recovery and Development and the United Nations System-Wide Special Initiative on Africa; and to support the promotion of South/South cooperation.
Assessment criteria The level of inter-agency consultations for which collaborative programmes had been devised; number of countries which embarked on the implementation of national Special Initiative on Africa (SIA) programme under one or several clusters; frequency of involvement of the ECA in SIA-related advisory services to member States and regional economic communities; and the frequency of up-dating the database for Programme Implementation, Monitoring and Evaluation (PRIME) as well as the SIA web site.
Major benefits realized Significant progress had been made in the mobilization of system-wide synergies for implementation and strengthening of system-wide coordination and harmonization, including with the Bretton Woods institutions. To strengthen Africa’s ownership of the New Agenda: substantive servicing was provided to high-level regional conferences and meetings on economic and social development and planning; technical inter-agency consultations and thematic Expert Group meetings were organized; the SIA web site on the Internet became active and quarterly issues of the SIA Newsletter were published; the communication strategy included actions aimed at redressing Africa’s image through balanced reports and the enhancing of the UN public image in Africa. Targeted groups included African policy makers, opinion makers in countries’ industrial sectors, civil society, friends of Africa, the donor community, and the domestic and international media. An SIA-related CD-ROM was prepared and distributed. In support of the consolidation of the democratization process in Africa: an important contribution was made to the Second and Third ECA/UNDP-sponsored Annual Governance Forum; the impact of the administrative reforms conducted in a number of countries in West and Central Africa was reviewed and lessons learned formulated. To foster economic policy making and management and to strengthen the position of African countries in the global economy: a substantive contribution to the ILO/ECA programme of support to the informal sector development in Africa; the organization of the Sub-regional Follow-up Conference to the World Summit on Social Development for West and Central Africa; substantive input to the Ad Hoc Expert Group on Economic Diversification in Africa as well as to the formulation of a framework of action for SIA; and the organization of the Forum on sources of finance, market opportunities and technical support. To promote gender mainstreaming: organized the workshop on Media and Gender which focused on women and economic development; provided support to the African Centre for Women in the design and publication of country pamphlets on the status of women; and substantive servicing of the Sixth African Regional Conference on Women. To support regional economic cooperation and integration: the rationalization and strengthening of the institutional framework for regional cooperation and integration with an analytical study on the assessment of the regional cooperation/integration instruments under the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC) and the Union Economique et Monétaire Ouest Africaine (UEMOA) with emphasis on trade and investments.

Consultations with the core lead agencies under the SIA, including the World Bank, UNICEF, WHO, as well as the UNDP country offices to facilitate donor coordination, promote country-level policy dialogue, and explore appropriate resource mobilization strategies for the identified sectors at the country level. Technical assistance in applying information technology for development, including posting information and databases on the Internet.

 

Subprogramme 3. The campaign for global awareness of the critical economic situation in Africa
Objectives To highlight the nature of the critical economic and social situation in Africa and efforts required for recovery and development; to promote major international and local initiatives that will contribute to Africa’s economic progress; to promote regional and subregional cooperation and integration; and to publicize the progress achieved in the implementation of the Agenda, the System-wide Plan of Action for African Economic Recovery and Development and the Special Initiative on Africa.
Assessment criteria

The feedback from end users of recurrent publications and other information materials. The reflection of information provided, UN views, positions and assessments in international, regional and national media.

Major benefits realized Posted onto the web site nine issues of AFRICA RECOVERY in two languages (French and English), increasing the reach of the programme to a wider audience (requests for new subscriptions and sets of back issues, received through the web site, indicate the positive user reaction). Designed and implemented major media and outreach campaign to promote the launch of the Secretary-General's report to the Security Council on resolution of conflict in Africa. Produced nine issues of regular publication instead of the usual eight. Received feedback from colleagues attending technical and other inter-agency meetings that African finance and economic development ministers use analyses of economic issues published by AFRICA RECOVERY to illustrate points they want to make to World Bank, IMF, WTO and other international organizations.
Legislative review The annual review of the programme was undertaken by the Committee for Programme and Coordination (CPC). At its thirty-eighth session, CPC reviewed progress reports on the implementation of UN-NADAF and SIA and expressed satisfaction with the work done for the Special Initiative to take off. Performance reviews also took place within the yearly meeting of the ACC Steering Committee on UNSIA.
External review and evaluation Since the review and assessment of the mechanisms established within the United Nations to support the implementation of UN-NADAF by the Joint Inspection Unit in 1995, the programme was not subject to a formal external review. Nevertheless, numerous positive feedback reactions from major stakeholders underscore its relevance and positive impact.
Internal evaluation

and lessons learned

Although it is still early for the Special Initiative to live up to all its potential, productive efforts have been made by a number of UN entities to integrate the priorities of the Special Initiative into their activities. Some African countries have fully embraced the Initiative. Nevertheless, its speedy implementation through country-level programmes is essential, especially in the clusters where visible progress has been achieved, such as in education, health, governance and information technology. In this regard, improved strategies in resource mobilization and the link of SIA processes with those of UNDAF are of utmost importance. However, the difficulty with harmonization of UN programming instruments and implementation arrangements persists. The Special Initiative has the potential of offering effective modalities for advancement in all areas of synergy.

Impact of reform and restructuring

More emphasis was given to activities aimed at (i) building partnership for the promotion of the private sector, (ii) revitalizing regional economic cooperation and integration; and (iii) developing more substantive communication and monitoring tools in the framework of the implementation of the UN System-wide Special Initiative on Africa. The communications strategy has been redesigned into a more comprehensive advocacy and outreach tool on the work of the United Nations in Africa.

 

Section 11A. Trade and development – qualitative assessment of programme performance

Sub-

programmes

1. Globalization and development 2. Investment, enterprise development and technology 3. International trade in goods and services and commodities
Objectives To support the international debate and to further consensus-building on global economic issues and development strategies; to promote successful development experiences; to promote durable solutions to and effective management of external debt and to contribute to the initiative on African economic development and to improving the Palestinian economy. To analyse trends in investment and technology flows and related development issues; to foster policies favouring technological capacity-building, innovation, competitiveness and investment in developing countries; and to facilitate the formulation and implementation of enterprise development strategies. To support the integration of developing countries and countries in transition into the international trading system and to enhance their negotiating capacity; to analyze world commodity trends and prospects; to study competition law and policy and to contribute to a better understanding of linkages between trade, environment and development.
Assessment criteria Effective substantive support to and servicing of intergovernmental and expert bodies; wide and timely dissemination of research reports; information and data. Usefulness, efficiency and practical impact of technical assistance and training. Feedback from end-users on the quality of specific outputs and media reviews of them; acceptance of policy recommendations and implementation of technical advice.
Major benefits realized The Trade and Development Reports were recognized as facilitating the review of the international monetary and financial architecture from a development perspective. The reports on the financial crises in Asia and Russia were noted for their timeliness and analytical impact. Activities on Africa expanded with emphasis on its trade competitiveness as the derivative of institutional development, economic policies and investment in infrastructure. Outputs on foreign portfolio investment facilitated the formulation of possible policies to cope with the increased size and sophistication of investment flows. The Debt Management and Financial Analysis System (DMFAS) has experienced steady growth in demand, covering more than 50 countries and comprising the long-term debt of more than US$ 520 billion, or around 30 % of the total for all developing countries. Technical assistance to the Palestinian people continued to receive endorsement with new requests for services from the Palestinian Authority. The contribution of the World Investment Reports to elucidating the mechanisms and dynamics of globalization and its impact on developing countries, as well as the analysis of trends and effects of investment flows, outputs on international investment agreements and policy reviews on science, technology and innovation were positively received by the target users. Provided substantive support to intergovernmental and expert meetings dealing with the implications of the post-Uruguay Round economic environment for enterprise development, including policy issues relevant to inter-firm cooperation, innovative and competitiveness incentives. Enterprise development policy was supported by field projects, in particular concerning women entrepreneurs in LDCs. The demand for the entrepreneurship development programme EMPRETEC doubled the number of beneficiary countries. Technical assistance on accounting reform and retraining comprised over 1,000 professionals at national and regional levels. Analytical support to meetings of the preparatory process for WTO Ministerial Conference facilitated formulation of proposals by developing countries, adoption of common positions, within sub-regional groups in Africa in particular, and influenced negotiating options. Direct assistance was provided to countries in the process of acceding to the WTO. Developing countries and countries in transition benefited from projects assisting them to utilize preferences and to negotiate free trade agreements among themselves or with developed countries. In the area of commodity diversification, outputs fostered dialogue with non-governmental actors on their inputs into the developing countries' programmes of diversification and upgrading their commodity sector. Training materials were developed to assist producers in the use of commodity price risk management instruments and structuring techniques reducing the risks in commodity financing transactions. Research reports contributed to enhancing the debate in UNCTAD and WTO on competition and development. Assistance was provided on adoption of national competition legislation and training of officials responsible for implementation of the law. Analysis was made and disseminated on improving domestic policy coordination and facilitating international negotiations on salient trade and environment issues; fostering environmentally sound and economically viable natural resource management in developing countries and promoting the production and export of environmentally preferable products; promoting the diffusion of best environmental practices and environmentally sound technologies.

 

 

Sub-

programmes

4. Services infrastructure for development and trade efficiency 5. Least developed, landlocked and island developing countries
Objectives To strengthen trade-supporting services, infrastructure and logistics in developing countries and countries in transition; to facilitate their access to global information technologies and to build up relevant training capacities, with emphasis on small-scale enterprises. To assist in monitoring and implementing the Programme of Action for the LDCs; to facilitate transit trade for landlocked developing countries; to contribute to the Programme of Action for sustainable development of small island developing States and to provide relevant technical assistance.
Assessment criteria Awareness and acceptance of UNCTAD policy recommendations. Increased interest in and demand for services. Relevance and impact of advisory services, technical assistance and training as evaluated by recipients and donors.
Major benefits realized The analytical outputs on trade facilitation, transport and logistics, including their regulatory aspects and reflection in multilateral trade negotiations, are considered by operators and policy-makers as the comprehensive reference. The Advance Cargo Information System was in high demand, and feedback indicates that it had contributed to the strengthening of the institutional capabilities, the management systems and the efficiency of public administrations of countries using it. The work on services for development concentrated on the implementation of the Trade Point Programme and on human resources development. A major achievement in the area of business facilitation was the adoption of the International Convention on Arrest of Ships. Eighteen landlocked and transit developed countries have benefited from assistance in the preparation and negotiation of transit agreements. Work on electronic commerce expanded significantly both at various governmental levels and in providing assistance at the national and regional levels. The seminars and workshops on insurance focused on the essence of effective regulation and its enforcement rules, consumer protection and competition rules as factors of stability. UNCTAD received a special award of the African Insurance Organization for intellectual contribution and enlightened advice. The customs automation and reform projects under the ASYCUDA programme in over 20 countries served to modernize and streamline customs procedures and increase revenue. Providing substantive inputs for and servicing of intergovernmental bodies regarding the implementation of the Programme of Action; supporting consultations of LDC delegations at Ministerial meetings and assisting in formulating LDCs' proposals for the WTO Ministerial Meeting, including the preparation of the Handbook for Trade Negotiators from LDCs. The preparatory process for the Third UN Conference on LDCs was launched at the global and national levels. The LDC Report was welcomed and appreciated by the target users. UNCTAD has participated in the implementation of activities under the Integrated Framework for Trade-related Technical Assistance to LDCs. With respect to landlocked developing countries, studies analysing transit transport systems at the subregional, regional and global levels were prepared for the intergovernmental and expert bodies. UNCTAD assisted in consensus building among key stakeholders of developing transit transport systems. Moreover, support was provided to transit and landlocked countries to reach agreement on actions to improve transit transport systems and trade efficiency. On small island developing States, contributions were made to the implementation of economic aspects of the Barbados Programme of Action, in particular, those relating to trade liberalization and globalization and economic vulnerability.
Legislative review In their conclusions, the Trade and Development Board and its subordinate bodies recognized the importance and usefulness of UNCTAD's three flagship reports; expressed appreciation for the sound, independent and timely analysis on seminal issues and contribution to policy-making; and recognized the work aimed at capacity-building in developing countries.
External review and evaluation Feedback mechanisms are in place to obtain systematically, through surveys, the assessment of publications by the target end-users. In their evaluations of specific publications, the majority of respondents found them "very useful" and more than one third judged them as "useful" for policy considerations, research and teaching. In-depth evaluations of technical cooperation programmes by independent experts made recommendations on enhancing the efficiency of programme delivery, which are being implemented. CPC in its report on evaluation at the thirty-eighth session commended UNCTAD on its evaluation mechanisms, which include the involvement of member States.
Internal evaluation

And lessons learned

The biennial self-evaluations were reviewed by senior management, reflected in the mid-term review of the implementation of commitments adopted by UNCTAD IX and made available to Governments in the context of the preparations for UNCTAD X. They focused on implementation, future areas of emphasis and related allocation of resources. The internal planning system for the preparation of intergovernmental meetings includes assessment of the outcome of these meetings as well as follow-up action. The follow-up action on lessons learned was aimed at bringing resources in line with mandates; the strengthening of inter-divisional cooperation and coordination; the reinforcement of cooperation with other organizations both within and outside the UN system, civil society and NGOs
Impact of reform and restructuring The restructuring and reduction in conference-servicing requirements decided at UNCTAD IX resulted in cost savings.

Section 11B. International Trade Centre UNCTAD/WTO – qualitative assessment of programme performance

Subprogramme 1. Institutional development and support services for trade promotion, export development and international purchasing and supply management

Objectives

Assessment criteria

Major benefits realized

1. Enhancing the competitiveness of enterprises in world markets through the development of institutional capacities for the delivery of effective trade support services. Improved provision of services by support institutions. Increased demand for and satisfaction with services provided. Number of requests for national customizations of diagnostic tools, learning systems and practical guides for enterprises. Better communication and networking among institutions. Enterprises benefited from information, advisory and training activities relating to the business implications of the multilateral trading system through the established network of trade support institutions acting as multiplier relays for ITC products and services. The latter covered the enterprise business cycle: from planning for export and identifying customers and markets to trade financing, supply management and product development and adaptation, including quality control and packaging; marketing, pricing; and contracting. The ITC range of diagnostic tools, learning systems and practical guides as well as their national adaptation was further expanded. For instance, the customization of Trade Secrets: The Export Answer Book covered more than 40 countries and about 6,000 copies were disseminated by partner organizations. In-depth vertical assistance to selected enterprises in priority sectors was provided in partnership with national institutions during a process that linked counselling to individual enterprises with assistance to trade support institutions or business associations in order to obtain sustainable capacity-building and other multiplier effects. ITC played a catalytic role in the establishment of the interactive national networks bringing together all groups dealing with WTO issues and progressively linking them at the international level through a World Trade Net. The first Executive Forum on National Export Strategies gathered representatives from 16 developing countries and transition economies as well as from trade-related international organizations and national trade promotion organizations. The Forum reinforced the importance of adapting the traditional trade promotion approaches to the evolving multilateral trading system and promoted best practices in public-private sector partnership, consolidating trade-industry and trade-investment linkages, and revamping the institutional structure for trade promotion.
2. Establishing sustainable capacities for human resource development in international business. Increasing demand for participation in the Trade Tutor Programme. Training and counseling programmes delivered by ITC-trained partners. Practical impact on small/medium enterprises. The ITC approach combined equipping teams of trainers and counsellors with skills to develop human resources and disseminating field-tested generic materials and tools to national network members, who in turn created and delivered services to enhance the trade-related abilities of enterprises. Almost 100 trainers and counsellors from international business training centres in 8 countries, mainly in Africa, participated in the ITC Trade Tutor Programme. It was complemented by in-company consultancy services and practical marketing activities. The trainers’ tool Foundation Programme in International Business Management was completed. Enterprise supporting tools for trade management analysis, strategic planning and for assessing counseling and training requirements were successfully tested.
3. Improving the capabilities of importers to use foreign exchange resources more cost-effectively in the importation of goods and services. Design and delivery of training by ITC-trained partners. Financial self-sustainability of training programmes. Local translation of ITC tools and materials supported by partners. Practical application of skills learned. Purchasing and supply management associations (PSMAs) were established/strengthened in an increasing number of partner countries to help enterprises manage the supply chain more effectively. A special ITC news and information bulletin for PSMAs, the International Purchasing and Supply Link, started to be published. Teams of trainers attached to PSMAs and relevant industrial, trade and management training organizations were trained to respond effectively and on a sustainable basis to local training needs of importers in 10 developing countries. To support the capacity-building efforts in international purchasing and supply management, several modules of a Modular Learning System (MLS) were completed. Selected modules of the MLS were tested in three countries bringing together trainers and entrepreneurs. In the field of public procurement, in addition to advisory services at the country level, ITC co-sponsored and organized the Conference on Public Procurement Reform, in which 30 African countries participated and, inter alia, reached a consensus for regional reform.
Subprogramme 2. Market development and trade information
1. Building up capacities at the business-sector level to develop internationally competitive products and services and to market them more effectively with a view to expanding and diversifying exports. Coverage of events by international media. Premium prices paid for promoted products. New markets penetrated. Number of visits to the Internet web site; expansion of services available through it. Activities focused on 12 broad sectors, with emphasis on diversification and upgrading to promote demand at higher prices, e.g. the gourmet coffee project resulted in the first Internet coffee auction in Brazil with a premium of about 50% over the normal prices. Enterprises in beneficiary countries were made aware of emerging and promising markets, such as organic products. The survey Organic Food and Beverages: World Supply and Major European Markets was used for export workshops and advisory services in eight LDCs and other low-income countries in Africa. An all-round approach was adopted for leather products: quality improvement, export development and the organization of a major regional event successfully generated trade opportunities, created awareness and established a sectoral image. The African Federation of Leather and Allied Industry was created during the event. New frontiers for international marketing and promotion offered by the Internet were explored by ITC from different angles: visits to the Virtual Exhibition of artisanal products increased 12-fold (to over 300,000) in one year; the pilot Internet Match-Making for fruit and vegetables, enabling suppliers in developing countries to promote their products instantly to buyers worldwide, grew to 760 registered users by the end of 1999; the Services Exporting home page provided a one-stop source of information on markets and marketing, a forum to learn about business opportunities and the potential for strategic alliances. Nearly 300 trade associations on services have already registered and over 1,000 contacts for information were received monthly. Awareness of the developments in the global market, especially in the light of the WTO Agreements, was enhanced by both research studies and dissemination events for information technology products. Similarly, the importance of eco-labelling was promoted among textiles and clothing-producing countries. The ITC methodology for intraregional trade and South-South trade development continued to be successfully applied and business-to-business links between enterprises in different countries were established or expanded through systematic assessments of supply and demand complementarities, and subsequent testing of findings in real-life situations such as buyers-sellers meetings, which paved the way to actual business transactions.
2. Improving, on a sustainable basis, the availability, dissemination and utilization of trade information Number of inquiries for marketing information; subscriptions to ITC information services; demand for priced tailor-made trade flow analyses; number of users of trade information services and Trade Points; use of ITC tools for benchmarking. The ITC new strategy for trade information focused on capacity-building through establishing effective information services/networks at the national and regional levels. Trade Points especially benefited from the ITC extension services and training, within the global framework of the UNCTAD Special Programme for Trade Efficiency. The dissemination of tools, such as specialized classifications/coding systems, application software for referral databases, company registers and the web applications, was intensified. The ITC database management system was revised to facilitate the access to factual and referral information through the Internet or on CD-ROMs; indexes to trade information sources on the Internet were continuously updated and expanded, coupled with the transfer of know-how for carrying out research and operating in a cybermarketing environment. The ITC strategic market research tools (National Export TradeMaps, Market Diversification TradeMaps, Trade Performance Index) were in strong demand. Trade support institutions in a growing number of partner countries used them for benchmarking national trade performance and for identifying priorities for product and market development. The ITC market research programme, which produces single- and multi-client studies, provides training, and prepares the world trade database PC-TAS on CD-ROM, operated largely on a cost-recovery basis.
Legislative review The Joint Advisory Group commended ITC initiatives to enhance the competitiveness of small and medium enterprises, strengthen the capacities of trade support institutions and to foster sustainable development through ownership of the development process by the beneficiaries themselves; it endorsed also the new ITC strategy for product and market development. The new ITC strategy for trade information was supported by the ITC technical Meeting.
External review and evaluation The programme delivery was regularly reviewed by ITC's parent bodies and their advisory mechanisms, donors and beneficiaries. In line with the recommendations of OIOS and the Board of Auditors, ITC formulated a Resource Mobilization Strategy; strengthened its Project Cycle Management; studied best practices in the result-based management of technical assistance; redefined its Publication Policy; and improved its planning tools to better prioritize and monitor research. The strategy on needs assessments and programme design was finalized and procedures for subcontracts and assessment of consultants’ performance were improved as a follow-up to OIOS audits. External evaluations had sectoral and thematic emphasis aimed at recommendations applicable to the organization as a whole.
Internal evaluation and lessons learned Summarized evaluation findings, lessons learned and recommendations were disseminated through the "Evaluation News" bulletin and posted on a special Intranet page " Evaluation Facts and Tools" which also includes methodological and self-learning tools. PAS is being integrated into the overall evaluation of organizational performances, thus underlining the close links between staff performance and the impact of the whole organization. Procedures have been established to ensure the integration of evaluations and reviews in the execution of projects. A Project Appraisal and Clearance Committee (PACC) reviewed project ideas and documents and ensured that past evaluations' findings and lessons learned were duly taken into consideration in their final drafting. PACC's conclusions were then validated and approved by the Senior Management Committee (SMC) which met every week.
Impact of reform and restructuring ITC has been working closely with other UN agencies in implementing the new mechanism to strengthen field coordination. Its Efficiency Review Group focused on streamlining procedures and paper work, ensuring transparency in administration and enhancing overall cost-effectiveness. Its recommendations resulted in improvements in functioning of the Joint Advisory Group; in material supply; building facilities; utilization of equipment; in formulation and monitoring of the Publications Programme; and in travel and information systems.

 

Section 12. Environment – qualitative analysis of programme performance

Sub-programmes

Objectives

Assessment criteria

Major benefits realized

1. Sustainable management and use of natural resources 1. To strengthen international action on water resources; to combat dryland degradation and desertification. Improved coordination in the area of freshwater, coastal and marine resources. Policy-relevant assessment of the negative impacts of land degradation. Support to global and regional initiatives on the management of freshwater resources and marine and coastal areas. Strengthened the implementation of the Global Programme of Action for the Protection of the Marine Environment from land-based activities. Contribution to adopting the Convention to Combat Desertification and support to its implementation. Assistance in monitoring land degradation and investigation of its factors and consequences.
2. To safeguard biodiversity and to enhance its sustainable use. To promote the equitable use of genetic resources. National use of measures for the sustainable management of bioresources. Trained manpower at national and regional levels. Increased compliance with environmental principles and agreements. Stronger link between the scientific community and policy makers at the national and international levels. Policy and advisory services in key areas of institution building. Significant results in the area of biotechnology and biosafety, forests and coral reef protection.
3. To strengthen the scientific basis for response to climate change. To promote international actions to mitigate/adapt to climate change. Wide accession to the Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and incorporation of climate considerations into national development strategies. Outputs on vulnerability index, adaptation and national communications have placed UNEP in the lead of the adaptation work under UNFCCC. Convened a special session of the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment, focusing on Clean Development Mechanism issues.
2. Sustainable production and consumption To promote cleaner and safer production/consumption patterns and to improve environmental management of energy systems. Positive response to advice by target users. Recommendations implemented by them. Raised international awareness of sustainable consumption patterns. National and regional cleaner production centres strengthened and catalyzed. Wider national networks of active experts. Greater incorporation of environmental concepts and UNEP suggestions into the energy sector decision-making. Faster market penetration of renewable energy technologies.
3. A better environment for human health and well-being 1. To promote the sound management of chemicals through effective international measures. Intergovernmental mechanism and clearing house are operational.

Effective training and advisory services.

Effective secretariat support for the Rotterdam Convention, procedural follow-up and training in its implementation. Facilitated the negotiations of an international legal instrument on persistent organic pollutants, and supported national action on the early reduction/elimination of their releases. Assessed the toxic exposure globally and regionally and promoted protection measures.
2. To advance environmental management through environmentally sound technologies. To advise on emerging environmental and health issues and on relevant action. Demand and feedback from target users; use of proper management tools; feedback from public through the Internet and e-mail. Outputs highlighted the role of ecosystems management in promoting health.

Demand for publications exceeded expectations. Positive media coverage of specific outputs. 1,500 downloads per month at the International Environmental Technology Centre’s (IETC) web site. Feedback via e-mail about 250 participants from 84 countries trained in IETC. Advisory services on specific environmental management needs, in particular under the Sustainable Cities programme.

3. To efficiently assist countries, in particular developing countries, affected by environmental disasters. Rapid and efficient mobilization of international assistance to environmental emergencies. Feedback from concerned parties. Improved delivery of international environmental emergency services. Increased support to national authorities, in particular from UN system, in responding to emergencies.
4. Handling globalization and the environment To support the development of coherent trade and environment policies in developing economies and those in transition and to promote environmentally responsible private investment patterns. To develop international legal regimes for major environmental issues and to promote awareness and implementation of international environmental agreements. Enhanced understanding in the target countries of links between trade and environment. Wider use of environmental impact assessments and resource accounting. Development of new international legal instruments and national environmental legislation and institutional regimes. Harmonization of such legislation among countries. Enhanced training of national lawyers and policy makers. Developing strategy packages for mutually supportive trade and environment policies. Undertaking integrated assessments of trade. Advising the finance sector on environmental dimension of its projects. Enhanced capacity in the selected countries for using assessment methodologies and market-based incentives to integrate environmental aspect into macro-economic policies. Assistance in developing global and regional environmental agreements, including enforcement aspects. Legislation in the three countries in East Africa is harmonized and progress achieved towards such harmonization in another region. Advisory services provided in developing national environmental legislation and institutional regimes. Officials of over 90 countries trained in environmental law and policy.
5. Global and regional servicing and support 1. To strengthen regional cooperation on common environmental problems.

To assist in addressing specific problems.

Timeliness and quality of output delivery in the regions.

Impact on intergovernmental dialogue.

Strengthening of regional and sub-regional collaborative programmes.

Increased awareness of and intergovernmental collaboration on new and emerging environmental issues. Consolidated sub-regional partnerships and growth in financial resources for joint activities. Integration of global conventions, policies and programmes, with the national, sub-regional and regional ones. Active regional networks for academia, decision makers and youth to promote capacity building. Heightened inter-agency coordination and synergy. Responded to growing demand for technical advice.
2. To coordinate the production of UNEP’s second Global Environment Outlook (GEO) report. To strengthen the global participatory assessment process. Feedback from partners, collaborators, donors, clients and product recipients and users. The integrated environmental assessment process developed for the GEO is being adopted at some national and regional levels, which will enhance the long-term mechanisms for global assessment and reporting.
3. To provide information for decision-making through the global network (INFOTERRA).

To ensure that the Mercure telecommunication system for global network services (UNEPnet) are operational and reliable.

Growth in subscriptions to INFOTERRA and in visits to its archives.

Reliability of Mercure and its ability to support innovative technologies.

Quality of services through UNEPnet.

The reform of the INFOTERRA network ensured greater support for informed decision-making. Subscriptions increased, allowed wider access to legal environmental resources. Interactive forum on global environmental issues is operational. Cost savings through lower telecommunications charges and decreased travel. Conferences allowed remote participation in important meetings and consultations.
4. To build broad support for environmental issues. To enhance the efficiency of the UN system-wide collaboration. Increase in contributions to the Environment Fund. Commitment by major stakeholders.

Pronounced interagency and inter-governmental support to UNEP’s policy and programme objectives.

Enhanced system-wide collaboration.

Increase in contributions to the Environment Fund.

The expansion and refocusing of media outreach and public relations has enhanced the profile of UNEP and strengthened the partnerships network. Governments have recognized UNEP as the "catalyst" on environmental matters, which lead to greater coherence and efficiency in the functioning of related institutional arrangements.

Increase in collaborative initiatives and joint projects. 24 countries increased their contributions and 8 new countries became contributors to the Environment Fund.

New sponsorship agreements with the private sector have been developed.

Legislative review Delivery of the biennial work programme is assessed by the Committee of Permanent Representatives (CPR) through quarterly reports on the implementation of the decisions of the Governing Council. The latter annually reviews a UNEP Evaluation Report.

Overall policy, programme objectives and activities were endorsed by resolutions and decisions of numerous intergovernmental bodies, including the General Assembly which welcomed the adoption of the Rotterdam Convention and the progress in the development of a global legally binding instrument on persistent organic pollutants.

Internal evaluation An in-depth evaluation is made for each subprogramme in the timeframe of the Medium-term Plan. In-depth evaluations are also carried out for projects with funding of over US$ 500,000, and for all pilot projects. They are done at the end of the project, at the end of a phase, or when substantial structural changes are to be made to the project. Besides the in-depth evaluations, annual self-evaluations are undertaken by project managers. Results of evaluations are translated into implementation plans, which are centrally monitored. Assessment of implementation is motored by the Management Board. Lessons learned from evaluations are incorporated into the biennial programme, and into the formulation of new projects through the Project Approval Group.
External review and evaluation OIOS review concluded that UNEP has rebuilt its global credibility and recaptured the confidence of its stakeholders.

The managerial reform enabled it to effectively fulfil its mandate relying on financial viability. It was recommended to energize the delegation of authority within UNEP and to strengthen horizontal interaction to enhance internal synergies to align more closely programme planning with budgeting and to improve the feedback assessment of the delivered outputs.

Impact of the United Nations reform and restructuring The new, function-based, organizational structure was established and allowed to address environmental issues in a holistic and integrated manner.

Streamlining and sharper programmatic focus renewed the confidence of Governments and resulted in increased funding for the Environment Programme and enhanced participation of Governments in policy development. The ongoing implementation of the recommendations of the Task Force on Environment and Human Settlements is aimed at further enhancing efficiency.

 

 

Section 13. Human settlements – qualitative analysis of programme performance

Sub-

Programmes

Objectives

Assessment criteria

Major benefits realized

1. Shelter and social services 1. To formulate relevant policies based on enablement, partnership, market involvement and social equity, with emphasis on the needs of vulnerable groups; to assist governments and civil society in adopting strategies for implementing the human right to adequate housing; and to strengthen their capacity in improving shelter and services by community-based actions. Acceptance of policy advice by end users. Practical assistance and guidelines on realizing housing rights and relevant actions by stakeholder groups. Engagement of communities in shelter and services development; improved co-ordination, exchange of experience and capacity building within stakeholder groups. Enhanced capacity of governments, communities and other stakeholders in developing regions to adopt effective long-term policies. Reports on "homelessness" and "women and property rights" emphasized these issues within a comprehensive shelter strategy. Joint research activities with major stakeholders; thematic reports, guidelines and field projects on settlement upgrading and community development contributed to capacity building and knowledge creation and helped to mobilize the potential of civil society in improving living and housing conditions. Practical aspects of the realization process of housing rights advanced through joint activities with OHCHR and civil society partners. Links strengthened with relevant UN agencies, with the World Bank and other international organizations.
2. To enhance the capacity of housing finance institutions (including micro-credit ones) to address the needs of low-income groups; to foster the capacity of the construction industry and its use of affordable building materials. Easier access of disadvantaged groups to housing finance facilities; stronger, diverse housing finance mechanisms. Improved stakeholders’ capacity and positive feedback from them. Capacity building through policy recommendations, advisory missions and field projects. Increased availability of information on local building materials and technologies, particularly in Africa. Promotion of environmentally sound construction technologies. Emphasized the role of private sector in housing delivery, particularly in the Central and Eastern Europe and the former USSR. Promotion of energy efficient construction technologies in several countries.
2. Urban management 1.To foster good governance and local leadership, appropriate polices and institutional instruments ensuring participatory management; to promote best local practices in human settlements management, with emphasis on reducing poverty and ensuring equity and active involvement of women. Number of consultations that achieved the urban development objectives; action plans adopted by city authorities and supported by necessary resources. Enhanced effectiveness of local stakeholders. Quantity, quality and impact of training materials and services. City consultations strengthened the overall capacity of local governance and improved the transparency, accountability and level of popular participation. A wider range of stakeholders became institutionally involved, including low-income and disadvantaged groups. The major achievement was that city officials involved in Habitat projects genuinely seemed to embrace the principles of good governance. In addition, manuals, training and advisory services were delivered and new demand for them was generated. New partnerships were formed, and there is now greater emphasis on local government collaboration with civil society than ever before.
2. To assist national/local governments in mobilizing/allocating financial resources for sustainable urban management and provide relevant training; to promote land management policies/practices ensuring sustainable settlements development and markets’ responsiveness to community needs. Enhanced national and local expertise in mobilizing resources, providing services more equitably, efficiently and cost-effectively. Strategic measures aimed at equal access to land and security of tenure. Information exchange and capacity building provided to national and local governments in the East African region through regional workshop and report on financing of municipal services. The Land Management Programme implemented a number of outputs in the area of knowledge building, institutional strengthening, advisory services, including joint activities with partners leading ultimately to improved conditions of the urban poor and to the regularization and upgrading of informal urban settlements.
3. To promote comprehensive, gender-sensitive human resources development policies involving local authorities, civil society, academic and educational institutions and the private sector; to promote integrated policies for poverty reduction, in partnership with national and local governmental and community-based organizations. Active use of UNCHS outputs. Increased demand for advisory and training services and delivery of relevant activities by partners. Visible recognition of gender mainstreaming at the municipal level. Viable mechanisms for plans of action on poverty geared to different areas. Enhanced local capacities to combat crime, to manage safer cities, and to create civic coalitions within cities. Increased demand for materials and training on gender mainstreaming. Five new groups in three different countries became actively engaged in the baseline survey for the women’s empowerment indicators. In Africa, a skills development project focused on identification of the needs of target groups, with gender as a crosscutting theme. In Latin America and the Caribbean, an activity has been developed on gender sensitive municipalities in the format of competition. Establishment of the African Forum on Urban Poverty, with main focus on the institutional framework. Increased awareness by cities of their role in poverty reduction and of the need to establish partnerships with civic society organizations. Improved awareness of the link between prevention and poverty reduction, and capacity to develop specific programmes for poverty reduction. Adoption by a number of African governments of urban poverty reduction plans; institutionalization of safer cities approach in a few African cities and development of specific tools and mechanisms for urban safety. Local coalitions formed in African cities for joint action on fighting urban insecurity.
3. Environment and infrastructure 1. To strengthen the capacity of governments and private sector to manage infrastructure and municipal services in efficient, environmentally sound and socially sustainable manner; to enhance local access to basic infrastructure by community involvement in building and maintaining it. Improved knowledge by governments and the private sector on basic infrastructure for the urban poor through demonstration projects for dissemination of best practices. Capacity was built at national and local levels through demonstration projects and training workshops. Sound management practices for basic infrastructure were demonstrated and adopted by local authorities. These good management approaches at local level were then shared and replicated at national level. Sustainability was ensured by institutionalization of the approach and replication through local funds.

Numerous reports were prepared and issued by reputable publishers, thus ensuring high technical standards, wide dissemination and better customer feedback. The review and feedback on these publications have been very positive.

2. To promote the concept, management practices and institutional basis for productive, equitable and sustainable cities; to strengthen integrated environmental management at the local level by enhancing planning capabilities, participatory mechanisms and information exchange. Operational demonstration city projects; adopted by-laws, development plans and urban pacts that reflect policy change at city level; global meetings to synthesize lessons and normative criteria, and resulting management tools developed As a result of Urban Environment Forum meetings, advisory missions under the 22 ongoing city demonstration projects, and various management tools, measurable impact was achieved at the city level on local authorities and urban communities, through changing policies, increased efficiency, improved environmental health and other indicators. At higher levels, more than three-quarters of the city demonstration projects have resulted in sub-national and/or national replications. Such multiplying dissemination of environmental governance principles and practices and generation of national policy changes advanced the objective of more sustainable cities.
3. To assist in improving the national and local capacities for disaster mitigation and preparedness and for managing post-disaster reconstruction. Effective international and regional co-operation mechanisms. Reliable financial resources and economic instruments to support mitigation and rehabilitation measures. Disaster mitigation plans formulated by a number of governments and rehabilitation programmes designed with the UNCHS technical assistance. Regional mechanisms for exchange of technical expertise on earthquakes and floods are launched in Central Asia and South Asia, respectively. Increased public awareness of disaster management practices through dissemination of printed and audio-visual materials.
4. Assessment, monitoring and information To foster the global capacity for the implementation of the Habitat Agenda; to enhance the partners’ capacity to collect, exchange and apply urban indicators and best practices, to monitor urbanization trends and assess policy responses; to promote public awareness of the Habitat Agenda and its key issues, of trends and conditions concerning human settlements and sustainable urban development. Active involvement of major stakeholders in monitoring and assessing the implementation of the Habitat Agenda at all levels; more effective partner co-operation in the collection, analyses, application and exchange of essential information; enhanced awareness by governments and partners of UNCHS' role as the focal point for implementing the Habitat Agenda and the two campaigns. Renewed emphasis on the partnership approach and the involvement of external partners, including local authorities and other major stakeholders in the review process. First State of the World’s Cities Report provided a summary review and analysis of urban indicators, best practices and lessons learned. Electronic Databases of Best Practices and the Urban Indicators became operational. An increasing number of partners established related databases of indicators and best practices. Through mutual web links between those databases, an increasing number of stakeholders are able to contribute to and benefit from information of direct relevance to decision-making, resource allocation and policy development. Intensified and focused information activities highlighted the revitalization of Habitat, advances in two global campaigns on Security of Tenure and Urban Governance and contributed to donors' renewal of confidence in the Centre.
Legislative review Implementation of the work programme and the financial situation of the Centre are reviewed on a quarterly basis by the Committee of Permanent Representatives. The Commission on Human Settlements, at its 17th session, noted the progress achieved in implementing the Habitat Agenda and endorsed the new strategic vision for the Centre; and its emphasis on two global campaigns as strategic points of entry for an effective implementation of the Habitat Agenda.
Internal evaluation A self-evaluation at the subprogramme level is undertaken at the end of the biennium. Most operational activities are subject to mid-term and/or final evaluations. Feedback from key stakeholder/beneficiaries is sought at various stages of programme development and implementation. A number of programmes conduct periodic internal evaluations of subprogramme activities. Lessons learned from evaluations are then incorporated into the biennial work programme, and into the formulation of new activities/projects at the design stage through the Programme Review Committee. Periodic internal reviews are also organized for selected programmes.
External review and evaluation The work of UNCHS is continuously reviewed and evaluated by Members States and stakeholders’ groups and partners. The recent OIOS inspection observed convincing advances in redefining the Centre’s mission, in re-focusing its work programme on strategic goals and in aligning new organizational and programmatic structures. The revitalization had established viable linkages between the operational and normative activities and had infused a healthy flexibility into its work processes. There are encouraging signs of an emerging new work culture which puts a premium on initiative, creativity and flexibility. OIOS recommended that financial and personnel management be given priority and be tackled as decisively , expeditiously and comprehensively as the programmatic areas.
Impact of the reform and restructuring The revitalization process, which began in September 1998 within the general framework of the United Nations reform, has resulted in a new vision translated into a strategically focused work programme and a streamlined organizational structure of the Centre, which was based on strategic goals and provided for enhanced flexibility in implementing substantive activities. The reorganization focused resources on strategic priorities, integrated the regional dimension into normative and policy-related activities and envisaged a long-term technology strategy to develop project management tools and enhance the use of the Internet.

 

Section 14. Crime control – qualitative assessment of programme performance

Objectives

Assessment criteria

Major benefits realized

To promote the rule of law and enhance national capacities to strengthen legislation, crime prevention, law enforcement and criminal justice systems; to foster international capacity for and cooperation in combating organized transnational crime. Usefulness, timeliness and quality of outputs and services, as assessed by end users and independent experts. The acceptance and practical impact of policy advice. Effective training and technical assistance. The programme strengthened its focus on those areas of crime prevention and criminal justice where it possesses comparative advantages and can provide the most added value, such as crucial support role for elaborating international legal instruments against organized crime and the initiation of three global programmes against transnational organized crime, trafficking in human beings and corruption. They enhanced in a consolidated manner the creation and dissemination of scientific knowledge, the application of standards and norms; the accumulation of expertise and the provision of advisory services and technical assistance. Substantive and technical services to the Committee on the Elaboration of the Convention against Transnational Organized Crime enabled it to advance its work on the convention and its three protocols so as to complete them prior to the Millennium Assembly. Frameworks were strengthened for developing global strategies, for internationally co-ordinated actions against crime, for field projects at the country and regional levels. Operational activities were strengthened and expanded. The donor confidence was reflected in significant increases in extrabudgetary contributions. Data collection, analysis and dissemination, including through the Internet, became more efficient. The Internet-based United Nations Crime and Justice Information Network (UNCJIN) has become one of the world’s most frequently visited substantive databases on crime statistics and criminal justice publications and has links to relevant United Nations entities, research organizations and universities. Recently, UNCJIN was selected as a "Best of the Web" Internet site by Encyclopaedia Britannica. The quality of substantive and technical services provided to the Commission has been improved, parallel to achieving a reduction in the quantity of documentation. The same applied to the substantive preparations for the Tenth United Nations Congress on the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders.
Section 15. International drug control – qualitative assessment of programme performance
Subprogramme 1. Coordination and promotion of international drug control
To foster international cooperation in drug control along with national coordination initiatives; to increase awareness of decision makers and the civil society on drug abuse; to mobilize resources for technical cooperation. Concerted international anti-drug activities. Effective information to officials, experts and all sectors of civil society. Impact of training. Feedback from concerned parties. Enhanced donor confidence. The system-wide cooperation framework was launched, with enhanced emphasis on collaboration at the field level undergirded by the resident coordinator system. Drug issues were advanced into the CCA and UNDAF processes. Two issues of the Bulletin on Narcotics were dedicated to the rapid assessment of drug abuse and comprehensive review of recent developments regarding cannabis. Following the adoption of the Action Plan on the manufacture, trafficking and abuse of amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) and their precursors, its implementation was launched in East and South East Asia. The thrust of related activities is aimed at raising awareness of ATS becoming the key global drug problem of the 21st century. Data on global illicit drug trends were compiled and analysed. The Fourth International Private Sector Conference on Drugs in the Workplace and the Community provided an opportunity to create a network of business partners and community leaders to promote drug and alcohol prevention programmes. The efforts to reinforce the relationships with traditional donors while broadening the contribution and encouraging cost-sharing arrangements with recipient countries and partner organizations resulted in about 30 per cent increase in voluntary contributions during the biennium.
Subprogramme 2. International drug control monitoring and policy-making
To provide substantive support and servicing to intergovernmental/

expert bodies in the area of international narcotics control; to foster and monitor compliance with relevant international instruments and strengthen controls over licitly traded drugs, psychotropic substances and precursors.

Timeliness and quality of substantive outputs and support services.

Positive feedback from end users. Practical impact of recommendations adopted by intergovernmental bodies.

The 20th special session of the General Assembly on international drug control was prepared and resulted in a comprehensive and balanced international strategy to tackle both illicit supply of and demand for drugs. More effective substantive support to and better organization of the work of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs and its subsidiary bodies markedly improved the quality of their proceedings and the practical utility of the adopted recommendations. The work of the Secretariat of the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) fostered close intergovernmental discussions and enabled governments to address weak aspects of their national drug control systems and to bring them more fully in line with the international drug control conventions. Regular communications with all other governments and cooperation with the media to secure wide dissemination of the findings in the Board annual report further promoted treaty adherence and compliance. Timely and appropriate interventions ensured that the worldwide controls over all licit activities related to narcotic drugs, psychotropic substances and chemicals (precursors) were adhered to by an increasing number of governments. The voluntary control measures adopted by ECOSOC for psychotropic substances were accepted in the majority of countries and contributed to better monitoring by INCB of these substances. This has led to the prevention of their diversion into illicit channels and to ensuring more adequate medical consumption levels. INCB succeeded in maintaining a balance between the supply and demand of opiates world-wide, making diversion from licit to illicit channels virtually non-existent. Substantive progress was achieved in the development of international and national controls of chemicals, which are used in the illicit manufacture of drugs, which prevented (by seizing substances and arresting traffickers) significant quantities from being used in illicit drug manufacture.

The Commentary on the 1988 United Nations Convention against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances was completed and published. A Maritime Drug law Enforcement Training Guide was issued.

 

Subprogramme 3. Prevention and reduction of drug abuse, elimination of illicit crops and suppression of illicit drug trafficking
To improve the quality and comparability, at national and international levels, of data and information on demand and supply reduction; to develop and disseminate standards, guidelines and methodologies for drug analysis and control; to act as the global centre of competence in international drug control; to develop effective countermeasures and model programmes against drug trafficking tailored to local conditions and to promote relevant best practices. Accurate, timely and comprehensive data collection and dissemination.

Effective monitoring, expert advice and technical assistance.

Positive feedback from end users.

Closer working ties were effected within UNDCP between law enforcement experts and technical cooperation work obviating the need for recruitment of consultants and thereby reducing programme costs. A drug law enforcement reference centre was established and the possibilities were assessed for the creation of a web site based means of mapping and coordinating law enforcement assistance being provided to or planned for Member States under bilateral or multilateral arrangements. The seizure data sharing project involving UNDCP, Interpol and the World Customs Organization became fully functional, yielding greatly improved regional trafficking trends analyses and contributing significantly to the successful "Global Illicit Drug Trends 1999" publication. Subsequently, production and dissemination of biannual reports of individual seizure data got under way. In the field of money laundering, work continued to focus on awareness-raising and promotion of anti-money laundering provisions through conferences, seminars and training workshops, including several devoted to law enforcement training, provided at the national and the regional level. The first comprehensive study of financial havens, banking secrecy and money laundering was prepared and published. The Money Laundering Financial Investigations Manual was produced for use in national training; the new United Nations model law on money laundering and asset confiscation for civil law system countries was prepared; and relevant training and technical assistance was provided worldwide. The Anti-money laundering international online database (AMLID) was enhanced and updated. Advice and assistance were provided regarding the money laundering portions of draft Convention against Transnational Organized Crime. Liaison and collaboration with relevant international bodies were fostered. To strengthen capacity of national drug testing laboratories, and supplement resources for drug screening by national law enforcement agencies, materials and equipment were provided to 43 forensic laboratories in 25 countries; professional training was provided to 128 staff from national laboratories in 46 countries. Manuals and guidelines on the detection and analysis of drugs and precursors were sent to 177 countries; 2125 copies of key reference materials were sent to 66 laboratories; 1,030 drug and precursor test kits were provided to national laboratories and law enforcement authorities in 48 countries; and 5,558 reference drug and chemical samples were sent to 111 countries. A global programme was launched for the environmentally safe eradication of narcotic crops; drug characterization/profiling methods were developed for methamphetamine and ephedrine samples; operational results reviewed with national authorities; new trends identified and guidelines on profiling prepared.
Legislative review The twentieth special session of the General Assembly provided sharper focus for interagency coordination in the field of drug control. The Office outputs and services were positively acknowledged in decisions of relevant intergovernmental bodies. A "customer satisfaction" assessment on the servicing of the eighth session of the Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice was carried out, which yielded responses with an average of eight on a scale of one to ten, with the lowest number indicating "not satisfied" and the highest number indicating "fully satisfied".
External review and evaluation The implementation of recommendations of the OIOS review of programme management had a positive impact on programme. Concerted efforts have been made to streamline the programme activities on the priorities of Member States and build up expertise on those issues, to improve operational activities and to reduce parliamentary documentation. Thirty-three evaluations of technical co-operation activities included two thematic evaluations and 31 project evaluations, which covered activities with total value of $53 million. Evaluation results were used to improve the relevance and quality of technical cooperation activities.
Internal evaluation and lessons learned An evaluation of the System-Wide Action Plan on Drug Abuse Control (SWAP) resulted in the ECOSOC recommendation that the SWAP be developed into a strategic planning tool. The formulation of a cooperation framework has thus been initiated by the ACC Subcommittee on Drug Control. The results of two internal project evaluations were fed back into programme and strategy formulation.
Impact of reform and restructuring The Office of Drug Control and Crime Prevention was created as part of the Secretary-General’s reform programme, bringing together under one Executive Director the United Nations International Drug Control Programme (UNDCP) and the Centre for International Crime Prevention (CICP). The strategy adopted by the twentieth special session of the General Assembly set specific targets for Member States to eliminate or significantly reduce illicit cultivation of drug crops, reduce illicit demand and other measures. In line with it, UNDCP was given a new set of responsibilities to assist the international community to implement the strategy. It was in this context that the Executive Director reoriented substantive priorities of UNDCP and proposed a revision to the medium-term plan on international drug control that was subsequently adopted by the General Assembly. The managerial reform of UNDCP involved reducing administrative layers, decentralizing responsibility and authority to programme managers at headquarters and in the field, eliminating many in-house committees, streamlining administrative processes, and taking advantage of synergies and mutual support by UNDCP and CICP. The reform also had a direct positive impact on the crime prevention and criminal justice activities. Member States have recognized the positive impacts of restructuring and reform through increased support for the programme, as demonstrated through requests for participating in the global programmes and in increased voluntary contributions to the United Nations Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Fund. The reform process also energized significantly the public information area.

Section 16. Economic and social development in Africa – qualitative assessment of programme performance

Sub-

programmes

Objectives

Assessment criteria

Major benefits realized

1. Facilitating economic and social policy analysis To assist in capacity-building for responding to emerging regional and global issues pertinent to Africa’s economic and social development; to promote higher education reforms; to reinforce national actions in the fight against poverty; and to enhance the economic and leadership roles of African women. Indices of the short- and long-term sustainability of African economies. Better awareness of seminal issues at national and regional levels; wider outreach of advocacy/information; increase in databases/ networks established; the feedback on the quality of services and outputs. Stronger overall framework for development policy analysis and effective advocacy on issues critical to Africa; durable ties with African research organizations and donor coordination mechanisms. Providing in-depth analyses of gender in relation to other development issues; issuing country profiles with benchmarks for measuring progress on the status of women and their economic empowerment. Establishing database of all clients and partners to enhance outreach. Result-oriented advisory services and training; better coordination mechanisms with other UN agencies and African regional organizations in the advocacy and advisory role to Member States.
2. Enhancing food security and sustainable development To raise awareness of food, population and environmental factors (the NEXUS issues) in development planning; to promote best regional and outside practices; to enhance national capacities to mobilize science and technology for development; to provide advice and assistance on the impact on development of the interaction among agricultural productivity, population and environment. Greater awareness of NEXUS issues in development planning and policy-making; enhanced national and local capacity to tackle them in the context of sustainable development; increased national ability to apply science and technology to ensure sustainable development. The policy analysis and advocacy resulted in deeper understanding of the NEXUS issues in development planning. The Population, Environment, Development and Agriculture (PEDA) model was customized for some countries. The Model has also been integrated into the training modules in training institutions of some universities. The feedback received on some of the recurrent publications and meetings/workshops was favourable in terms of their utility, capacity building, etc..
3. Strengthening development management To promote development management by energizing public and private sectors, forging closer partnership between civil society and governments, and by comparative analysis of best practices in Africa and outside. The impact of policy advice and discussions organized on attaining sound development management and on consensus building on critical issues, approaches and practices. Policy guidelines for advancing reforms in the public and private sectors; fostering policy debates on solutions to improve competitiveness and build up African capital markets; strengthening micro- and informal sector enterprises; creating a capacity-building framework for invigorating indigenous African Civil Society Organizations (CSOs); and the establishment of the African Centre for Civil Society.
4. Harnessing information for development To promote the efficient use of modern technology and communication networks for advancing social and economic development; to gather, harmonize and disseminate comprehensive multisectoral development information at the micro- and macro-levels through electronic data linkages with national and international partners; to develop data dissemination products; and to support relevant capacity-building. Implementation of ECA advice by Member States; number of African countries with national information and communication plans/strategies completed or in progress; increase in the number of: countries with direct connections to the Internet, of the Internet hosts, web sites and users in the region; improvements in the quality of the statistical systems and products in the region; number of modern, linked development information systems and databases at all levels in the region; number of visits to ECA Library’s web site; and volume of interlibrary loans. Development of national information programmes, fostering the expansion of Internet in the region. Decisive inputs into the formulation of National Information and Communication Infrastructure plans in 10 African countries. Launching the Technology Centre for Africa based on the ECA Intranet. ECA leadership regarding the African Information Society Initiative received wide recognition. Fostering regional consensus on statistical programmes and priorities and training national experts in diverse statistical areas. Providing advisory services on national accounts and basic statistics. The ECA Multisectoral Regional Statistical Database became fully functional and easily accessible, its products were widely disseminated. Advice on establishing a geographical information component within a national information infrastructure was provided to the Rwandan Government. An Africa-specific framework for simplified land information systems was developed and well received. The databases on geo-information issues were established and positively assessed by national agencies and by regional and international programmes. The databases of the ECA Library were mounted on the Intranet; a multimedia centre and desktop access to information were introduced. Independent bibliographic databases with access by internal and external users were created.
5. Promoting regional cooperation and integration To promote the creation of an integrated economic space for entire Africa through a coordinated development of natural resources, expansion of transport infrastructure and facilitation of sectoral integration and policy harmonization; to enhance the subregional cooperation and integration through effective technical support to governments and intergovernmental organizations, by fostering networking and information exchange, by facilitating interaction of the public sector, civil society and private sector development partners; by UN system-wide coordination of regional operational programmes; and to perform a more effective outreach function for ECA. Harmonization of macroeconomic policies. Adoption of integration and cooperation measures, institutional arrangements, regulatory frameworks and investment packages regarding the development of energy, natural resources and transboundary water resources, and enhanced government-private sector collaboration. Implementation of gender sensitive policy guidelines for the dissemination of energy and mining technologies in rural communities. Rural electrification prototype projects emphasizing new/renewable sources of energy designed and disseminated. Enhanced expertise in selected countries concerning commercialization of transport services; reduction in selected corridors of non-physical barriers to transport services; increased familiarization with transit agreements/conventions adopted by African countries. Support to the Regional Economic Communities and for the establishment of self-financing mechanisms confirmed the ECA’s leading role in these areas. Best practices on technologies for environmental and water management were disseminated. Policy framework for biotechnology application made available to Member States. The need for integration of social dimension in development activities was better appreciated. The gender mainstreaming and the holistic approach to the NEXUS issues were enhanced. Debt management analysis in conjunction with trade and investment influenced policy choices. ECA advocacy resulted in adoption of the regional framework for establishing an efficient transport and communications system; of a binding decision to liberalize shortly access to air transport market in Africa; and establishing a Pan-African Association for Port Cooperation; relevant collaboration with international organizations was strengthened. Regional cooperation was enhanced in the development of mineral, water and energy resources; and in the joint management of transboundary water resources
Legislative review All subprogrammes are reviewed annually by relevant intergovernmental bodies, which expressed their appreciation of their publications and quality of documentation submitted. In particular, the improved focus in the approach to women issues was commended; it was recommended to strengthen ECA leadership in regard to regional strategies for poverty alleviation.
External review and evaluation OIOS review noted the remarkable progress in transforming ECA into a viable and relevant organization and achieving more effective output delivery, and urged stronger support to its efforts to improve information technology and to build up human resources capacity. OIOS also recommended to improve the compliance with deadlines for parliamentary documentation; energize liaison with donor countries and to strengthen the feedback mechanisms of output delivery. Various activities were reviewed by special Advisory Groups, consisting of senior policy makers and experts, to ensure their maximum developmental impact and sharp focus. Feedback from participants at meetings was obtained through evaluation questionnaires to assess client satisfaction and to identify improvements.
Internal evaluation The quality assurance of major outputs is based on peer review. Each Division has a database of external experts used to evaluate specific products. Internally, selected staff is nominated within and across Divisions to review draft publications. Quarterly reviews of programme performance are held by the Executive Secretary with programme managers and their staff and measures are taken to address difficulties in programme delivery.
Impact of reform and restructuring The streamlined new programme orientation focused on five regional priorities, while capacity-building and promoting women in development were considered as cross-cutting and were mainstreamed across the five subprogrammes. The secretarial structure was realigned accordingly; related activities were clustered to foster synergy and efficiency. Internal/external communications were improved through intensified computerization, electronic networking, and use of the Internet as well as a more focused publication and dissemination activity. Organizationally, ECA moved to a flat, flexible, team-based, result-oriented structure based on the decentralization of resources and decision-making to substantive divisions with greater accountability for results. Subregional Development Centres were strengthened by redeploying of 25% of the ECA resources to them. The outcome of reform was an increase in efficiency and timeliness of programme delivery, and a higher rating of ECA outputs by the target users. The reform of the intergovernmental machinery resulted in the reduction of the number of Ministerial level conferences, and intergovernmental committees of experts, thus ensuring greater intergovernmental coherence and coordination.

Section 17. Economic and social development in Asia and the Pacific – qualitative assessment of programme performance

Sub-

programmes

Regional economic cooperation: 1. Trade and investment; 2. Research and policy analysis; 3. Industry and technology 4. Environment and sustainable development Poverty alleviation: 5. Social development; 6. Rural and urban development; 7. Population and development
Objectives To promote regional economic cooperation for enhancing trade and investment, accelerating industrial and technological development; to support the integration of developing countries in the region into the international trading system; to increase the understanding of the economic and social development situation in the region; to increase the ability in the region to formulate and implement policies and programmes. To promote the implementation of Agenda 21 and relevant international conventions at the regional level; to increase the capacity in the region in the formulation of strategic environmental management policies; the development and management of natural resources (water, energy, minerals); the application of space technology and the mitigation of natural disasters. To promote the implementation of the outcomes of WSSD, WCW, ICPD and Habitat II at the regional level; to formulate and implement social policy to address changing socio-economic trends in the region; to promote human resources potential of the poor and other social groups and the inclusion of disadvantaged groups in the mainstream development process; to increase the ability in the region to disseminate population data and information; to increase the ability in the region to develop and manage poverty alleviation programmes for rural and urban poor.
Assessment criteria Applicable to all subprogrammes: Level of interest and participation of major stakeholders and end-users in the activities and outputs of ESCAP reflected through direct feedback from them and explicit demand for future services. Efficient servicing of intergovernmental bodies. Wider outreach through publications, web sites, technical and information materials and networking. Improved international cooperation and inter-agency coordination and liaison. Increased demand for technical assistance and advisory services along with instances of supplementary funding by stakeholders and recipients. Feedback from participants in training; increase in financial reimbursement for training.
Major benefits realized Better understanding of the implications of accession to WTO and of major trade policy issues relevant to negotiations by developing economies at WTO. Strengthened subregional cooperation in the development and implementation of joint projects, particularly in BIMST-EC (Bangladesh-India-Myanmar-Sri Lanka-Thailand Economic Cooperation), Central Asia and the Greater Mekong subregion. Increased regional capacity in the facilitation of trade, e-commerce, the development of small enterprises and the use of clean technology. Enhanced understanding of the causes and impacts of the financial and economic crisis in Asia; relevant policy advice to decision makers on dealing with pertinent issues. Promotion of best practices in institutional arrangements and mechanisms at national, local and sectoral levels and modalities for environmental assessments with a view to integrating it into economic policy-making processes. Enhanced regional cooperation to ensure international competitiveness of manufacturing goods. Increased awareness and commitment to urban environmental improvement through switching to cleaner fuel in the transport sector, efforts to clean up pollutant emissions from power plants, increased reforestation, adoption of river revival programmes and development of national and local plans for implementation of Agenda 21. Strengthened North-East Asian Subregional Programme of Environment Cooperation. Enhanced regional co-operation in promoting the application of space technologies for the protection of environment, for the development and management of natural resources and the mitigation of natural disasters. Increased awareness and capacity in the conservation and efficient use of energy in selected industries. Clear regional perspectives for the global reviews and further follow-up to global conferences on social issues, women and population; substantial input to the Lisbon Declaration on Youth Policies and Programmes. Enhanced awareness of the need to address social development and human resources development issues, including the gender dimension and the integration of marginalized social groups, as a sustainable strategy for poverty alleviation. Wider and timely availability of regional population data and information through the increased use of information technology. Support to establishing national mechanisms for advancement of women and mainstreaming gender issues. Increased technical co-operation and sharing of experiences between national organizations participating in ESCAP projects.

 

 

 

Sub-

programmes

8. Transport and communications 9. Statistics 10. Least developed, landlocked and island developing countries
Objectives To promote an efficient, integrated, safe and sustainable infrastructure development in the region, through the implementation of the New Delhi Action Plan on Infrastructure Development in Asia and the Pacific; to develop interregional and intraregional transport linkages; to promote the development of sustainable tourism through the formulation and implementation of planning policies and human resources development. To provide regional socio-economic statistics, taking into account user demands; to support the development of national statistical systems and their harmonization regionally and internationally; to enhance the understanding of the role of information technology and promote the applications of it. To promote the regional implementation of the Programme of Action for the LDCs; to promote the regional implementation of the Programme of Action for sustainable development of small island developing states; to highlight trends and emerging problems of special concerns and to improve the capacity of least developed, landlocked and island developing countries to integrate more closely into the regional development and international economy.
Major benefits realized More harmonized technical standards and requirements for the development of national highway and railway routes of international importance in the ESCAP region. The formulation of effective subregional plans and programmes within the framework of the Asian Highway and the Trans-Asian Railway networks. Better understanding of international conventions relating to transport facilitation; increased awareness of the need for multimodal transport operators to ensure the smooth flow of goods. Increased regional cooperation, particularly in tourism education and training through the Network of Asia-Pacific Education and Training Institutes in Tourism (APETIT). Data available on socio-economic situation of ESCAP countries, including gender statistics (country profiles). Increased technical assistance on the implementation of the 1993 System of National Accounts as well as sharing of experience between statisticians in OECD and ESCAP countries in the implementation of 1993 SNA. Increased capacity and expertise in using information technology in national statistical offices.

 

Studies and research focused on finance for development, social issues, external trade and performance and economic infrastructure. Better understanding of the problems associated with the employment of youth and financial sector reform among the Pacific island developing countries. Better understanding of the problems associated with effective utilization of development assistance and multi-agency integrated initiatives of the development of exports among the least developed and landlocked developing countries. Enhanced technical cooperation and sharing of experiences between and among those countries.
Legislative review: The Commission welcomed new emphasis on group training; appreciated cost-effective dissemination of information through ESCAP web sites; appreciated close cooperation with NGOs and expressed its satisfaction with the overall level of programme implementation .
External assessment: OIOS encouraged further emphasis on fostering joint subregional projects, capacity-building and training and recommended strengthening horizontal cooperation and synergies in the secretariat. Eight projects funded by UNFPA and executed by ESCAP were evaluated by independent population specialists. Various intergovernmental bodies periodically review the implementation of programme of work and the use of resources, as well as evaluate the regional follow-up action to the global conferences on women, social development and population. Initiatives were taken by ESCAP to elicit feedback from target beneficiaries and users of services, including evaluation of meetings, training courses, publications, contents of the web sites and effectiveness of technical assistance projects. Where feasible in terms of programming cycle, findings of the evaluations served as the basis for subsequent programme changes and implementation.
Internal assessment and lessons learned: In pursuing the recommendations by ACABQ, OIOS and JIU on the need to streamline the publications programme of regional commissions, the secretariat produced in 1999 a "Guide to ESCAP Publication Activities" for its internal use. The benefits from the implementation of the Guide will be monitored and assessed during the biennium 2000-2001. The timely implementation of resolutions depended heavily on the availability of XB resources. Joint implementation of technical assistance activities was pursued to maximize resources and enhance the implementation of activities.
Impact of reform and restructuring: The revised conference structure reduced the duration of legislative meetings by 30 per cent: to a maximum of 48 meeting days per biennium from the previous maximum of 70. The longer-term impact of the ESCAP restructuring and reform will be assessed in the ongoing biennium.

 

Section 18. Economic development in Europe - qualitative assessment of programme performance

Subprogrammes

Objectives

Assessment criteria

Major benefits realized

1. Environment To aid the implementation of the ECE environmental conventions and protocols; to promote the implementation of Agenda 21 and the process of "Environment for Europe"; to enhance the environmental management capacity of countries in transition Accessions to conventions, protocols; implementation of recommendations made in Environmental Performance Reviews (EPRs). Change in national legislation lowers levels of pollution; increased ability of economies in transition to implement environmental conventions; integrating the environmental concerns of different sectors, as recommended by EPRs.
2. Transport To promote an efficient, integrated, safe and sustainable transport system in the ECE region, through the development, promotion and implementation of international legally binding instruments. Adoption of new international legal instruments in the field of transport and amendments to existing ones; development of pan-European corridors. A more efficient, safe and sustainable transport system; improved network of transport in Europe.
3. Statistics To help national statistical offices, in particular those of countries in transition; to promote coordination and methodological uniformity in statistics among international agencies; to provide essential regional socio-economic statistics Technical support to countries in transition; appreciation by end users of statistical data; integrated work programme of international organizations. Increased understanding by countries in transition of statistical methods and standards relevant to market economies; reduction of response burden and overlap in statistical work; data available on socio-economic situation of ECE countries.
4. Trade facilitation To promote harmonization in electronic trade information interchange. United Nations Electronic Data Interchange for Administration, Commerce and Trade (UNEDIFACT) developed and maintained; acceptance and implementation of ECE recommendations by countries. More standardized trade practices and procedures in the ECE region
5. Economic analysis To increase the ability in the region, particularly of countries in transition, to formulate and implement economic policies; to implement the outcome of the International Conference on Population and Development. Demand for ECE economic analyses; impact of economic discussions , training and advisory missions on population policies. Increased awareness of economic developments and problems in the ECE region; opportunities for economic discussion and policy debates; improved national capacity in the formulation and implementation of key national population policies and programmes.
6. Energy To promote the development of more sustainable energy systems in the countries of the ECE region, and in particular in those with economies in transition. Countries indicating that ECE studies, meetings, technical assistance and training sessions have contributed to the development of suitable energy policies; countries adopting market oriented legislation and policies, and/or norms and standards that are used by other countries in the ECE region. More understanding and awareness in ECE countries, particularly in countries in transition, of energy policies, energy efficiency, environmentally friendly practices and technologies related to the production and use of energy; Increased harmonization of legislation and policies, including norms and standards
7. Development of international trade To contribute to the adoption of policies that promote trade and investment cooperation; to disseminate the positive experience of developed market economies to countries with economies in transition to facilitate their integraion with market economies. Use of ECE guides for foreign investment, trade promotion, commercial practices, in the context of a market economy, by countries with economies in transition; strengthened participation of the private sector in trade-related activities of ECE. Effective change in practices and legislation in the field of trade and investment; promotion of public-private partnership in economies in transition
9. Agriculture and timber To facilitate the achievement of sustainable management of the forest and timber sector in the region; and to promote standardization of the commercial quality of agricultural produce. Publications and analytical studies on long-term outlook, production and trade statistics, market information, temperate and boreal forest resource, forestry assistance for countries with economies in transition, use of wood as a renewable raw material, and trade and environment issues in the forest sector; adoption of ECE standards on agricultural produce by countries. Availability of information and analysis on the forest and forest products sector; ECE standards and recommendations on agricultural produce; increased trade in agricultural produce.
10. Human settlements To strengthen international cooperation for sustainable urban development; to contribute to accelerating the modernization of housing maintenance and management and urban renewal; to promote adequate cadastral and land registration systems. Case studies and publications produced which propose appropriate human settlement policies and guidelines, based on an assessment of the situation of the urban sector in a number of cities/countries in the ECE region. Exchange of experience among cities and countries of the region on sustainable urban development; policy guidelines and recommendations on human settlement policies.
Legislative review All subprogrammes are reviewed at the annual sessions of principal subsidiary bodies (PSBs) which approve the programmes in detail, introduce changes when necessary and guide their implementation. The Commission and the PSBs have, at their annual sessions, frequently expressed their appreciation of the work of the secretariat.
Internal and external assessments Readership surveys are increasingly used as a tool for assessing publications. Majority of respondents evaluated them as very useful. Publications related to the transport of dangerous goods remain best sellers of the Organization, with close to 8,000 copies sold. Evaluation questionnaires are distributed routinely at intergovernmental meetings, with queries about the relevance of individual outputs, satisfaction of the delegations with overall format, organization and services provided. The vast majority of the feedback was positive. The feedback is used for improving the quality of services. Independent experts evaluated positively the population-related projects and made specific capacity-building recommendations. An authoritative report on the UN flagship publications underlined the quality of the Economic Survey of Europe. The Survey received 86 press reviews in a dozen languages and widespread coverage by electronic media; parts of it were reproduced for university teaching and in various meetings. In an evaluation made during the month of December 1999, the ECE web site received 1.2 million visits. The last OIOS audit of programme outputs resulted in the overall favourable appraisal and recommended strengthening planning and the development of performance indicators.
Impact of the reform and restructuring The ECE reform refocused its activities and streamlined the work programme; 14 subsidiary bodies were reduced to 8 principal subsidiary bodies (PSBs). All PSBs have adjusted their work programmes according to the strategic directions of the ECE Plan of Action. A Group of Experts has been established to advise the Commission on the arbitration between the competing additional demands from PSBs when they imply shifts among subprogrammes and on adjusting the programme of work according to changes in orientation and level of resources. The Group set up a system of prioritization of the work programme, which applies to the preparation of the biennial programme budget submissions.

Section 19. Economic and social development in Latin America - qualitative assessment of programme performace

Sub-programmes 1. Linkages with global economy, competitiveness and production specialization

2. Integration, open regionalism and regional cooperation

3. Productive, technological and entrepreneurial development 4. Macroeconomic equilibria, investment and financing
Objectives To examine strategic challenges and recommend policies for trade expansion. Strengthen the region’s negotiating capacity by advice on the regulatory framework for international trade. To enhance the national capacity to formulate and implement policies of supporting new technologies and entrepreneurial activity. To elucidate technology strategies of transnational corporations in the region. Analysis of regional economic trends and policies; assessment of balanced-growth development strategies and support to the design and implementation of policies to enhance investment and strengthen the financial infrastructure.
Assessment criteria Acceptance of recommendations on conceptual and practical problems in developing integration, with emphasis on infrastructure development and social dimension. Active demand for research papers and policy recommendations and consistent use of them in academic and policy discussions. Dynamic inflow of requests for technical assistance and extrabudgetary funding for them. The impact of ECLAC analysis and recommendations on economic policies and reforms. Close involvement of regional and national policy makers in ECLAC meetings and seminars. Acceptance and utilization of technical assistance rendered on the above subjects.
Major benefits realized Practical assistance on the implementation of integration agreements, improving free trade zones and modernizing the transport infrastructure. Fostering exchange of experiences among government officials responsible for trade policies and better understanding of multilateral and internal trade regulatory frameworks. The downloading of materials on the subjects from the ECLAC web site by external users increased four times during 1999. Publication of ECLAC materials by leading academic and policy-oriented periodicals and publishers. Frequent and consistent reference to ECLAC assessments and recommendations in national and regional discussions and negotiations on the subject. Implementation of 15 user-financed technical assistance projects advanced the objectives. Active and diverse worldwide usage of training on data processing. Direct, wider participation of academic sector and policy makers in theoretical and practical discussions. ECLAC analysis is consistently used in national and regional economic research, training and decision making. The target clientele of ECLAC products was expanded through active use of the Internet and hard copy distribution. Provision of coherent policy recommendations to governments with their impact assessed through feedback from users.
Sub-programmes 5. Social development and social equity 6. Administrative management 7. Environmental and land resource sustainability
Objectives Analysis of regional social trends and new national modalities of social services. Promotion of institutional mechanisms for full participation of women in economic, political and social areas. Enhancing the design of public policies and regulatory functions, including balanced reform processes and the policy agenda on social equity, public safety, corruption, poverty and drug abuse. Promotion of environmentally sustainable development and strengthening institutional mechanisms of environmental protection at national and regional levels. Support to the regional implementation of Agenda 21.
Assessment criteria The increased demand for subprogrammes’ products and tangible impact of ECLAC recommendations on regional and national policies. Wider use by academic sector, private sector and media. Steady demand for technical assistance accompanied by commensurate extrabudgetary financing. Feedback from users to assess the relevance and quality of products and services.

 

Major benefits realized A number of publications serve as preferred sources of reference regarding the social situation in the region. Findings and recommendations of specific research provided significant inputs into the formulation of national policies. The comprehensive response to the preparation of a regional directory of national organs in charge of policies and programmes for women. Increased relevance attached by governments to gender analysis in economic and social development processes. The subprogramme’s focus is on training, effectiveness of which is assessed through questionnaires; 94% of participants evaluated its impact on their professional development as "very important" and "important"; 42% attributed to the training greater responsibilities subsequently acquired by them; 100% responded that knowledge obtained was applied in their practical work. The positive impact of technical assistance is illustrated by the fact that the number of requests for it is twice as high as the feasible number; almost two thirds of those services were partially or completely financed by requisitioning countries. The feedback through the ECLAC web site and assessments of services provided show high level of satisfaction of end users. The subprogramme serves as the regional focal point on a number of pivotal environmental issues.
Sub-

programmes

8. Population and development 9. Statistics and economic projections 10 and 11. Subregional activities in Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean
Objectives To promote the incorporation of population variables into social policies and programmes, including the wider access to demographic information through modern software technologies. Analysis of determinants and implications of new migratory patterns. To strengthen the national capacities in producing statistics and projections for policy formulation and decision making; to promote technological advances in data processing and dissemination. To support economic policies of sustainable development, economic integration and enhanced industrial competitiveness; to facilitate equitable social policies.
Assessment criteria Acceptance of reports and recommendations by target users and their impact on discussions and policy decisions. Improvements in qualitative parameters of data banks, such as geographic coverage and timeliness, expansion of thematic coverage and data reliability. Wider dissemination of statistical data and analytical reports. Robust demand for products and services with their quality and usefulness measured through user surveys. Media coverage of activities.
Major benefits realized Wide dissemination of research, data and technical materials throughout academic institutions and regional and national decision making bodies. Growing number of downloads of technical materials from the web site reflects user interest. Acceptance of ECLAC statistical information outputs as the authoritative source of data and analysis in professional discussions and policy design. Growing number of downloads of technical materials from the web site reflects user interest. Strong and continuous support to specialized intergovernmental bodies, a number of which acknowledged the positive impact of research, technical assistance, advisory services and training.

A number of studies were included in authoritative professional publications.

Legislative review On a number of occasions, the Commission and specialized regional intergovernmental bodies noted with appreciation the secretariat’s input into various aspects of the region’s economic and social development.
External review and evaluation OIOS assessment concluded that ECLAC comes across as a performance driven outfit focused both on the quality and timeliness of outputs. Its research and studies enjoy a solid reputation and set the tone for academic discussion in the region. It proved itself as a reliable source of pragmatic policy advice to the policy makers and an effective training institution for national experts. Renowned trade publications have voted the ECLAC web site the best source of economic information on Latin America. Specific improvements of administrative support to programme delivery were recommended and acted upon.
Internal evaluation

and lessons learned

Quality surveys indicate users’ satisfaction with the analytical relevance and solid statistical coverage of main products. At the same time, better adaptability to emerging issues and more effective dissemination of outputs were emphasized. In follow-up, a number of periodic publications were merged and reformatted; in some cases, thematic and geographic readjustment of activities undertaken. The ECLAC web site was structured to increase the visibility and availability of outputs.
Impact of the United Nations reform and restructuring Decentralization of administrative and financial management to divisions responsible for implementation of the work programme enhanced accountability and budgetary controls, thereby improving the use of resources and enhancing the ECLAC’s capacity to respond to the requirements of the region. The integration of gender issues in several subprogrammes enhanced gender analysis in the economic and social development processes by governments of the region, supported by the consensus at the VII Regional Conference on Women.

 

 

Section 20. Economic and social development in Western Asia – qualitative assessment of programme performance

Subprogrammes

Objectives

Assessment criteria

Major benefits realized

1. Management of natural resources and environment To promote the regional harmonization of environmental policies and standards in the energy and water sectors; to support the development of sustainable sources of energy and water and the rational use and conservation of these resources. Acceptance and implementation by end users of advice on policies, norms, standards and legislation; implementation of recommendations concerning the development of suitable alternative sources of energy and fresh water, especially in rural areas. Catalyzed exchange of experience on the development and better management of water resources and reforming water policies to address emerging needs. Reviewed energy-relevant national environmental standards with a view to their harmonization. Advised on environmental legislation and procedures to improve enforcement mechanisms. Supported national capacity building for incorporating the environmental dimension into energy and water policies. Recommended cooperation modalities for creating an electricity network for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council. Action-oriented advice on alternative and non-conventional sources of energy and water, on sustainable agricultural production and irrigation management.
2. Improvement of the quality of life To promote regional cooperation in harmonizing social policies and setting standards and regulations for improving the quality of life;

to support an integrated national implementation of the recommendations of global conferences on social development.

Raised awareness, including of recommendations of global conferences and their implications, build-up national and regional capacities and viable action-oriented social policies and standards on key issues. Enhanced interagency cooperation on these issues. Examined approaches to alleviating poverty. Helped to launch human development networks in four countries. Setting regional standards for training on community development. Direct computer training for the blind. Studies/meetings on relationship between urbanization and environment promoted interregional exchange on relevant seminal issues. Support to establishing national mechanisms for advancement of women and mainstreaming gender issues. Set up a database for monitoring and evaluating social policies in the region. Launched and serviced a regional, intergovernmental follow-up machinery for the global conferences, which resulted in action-oriented policy recommendations, along with a regional integrated interagency follow-up project.
3. Economic development and global changes To expand understanding of economic development in the region and the impact of economic liberalization and enhance participation in global economic arrangements. To strengthen the capacity of member countries to implement economic reform policies, privatization and deregulation measures. Insightful, in-depth and timely research, discussions and policy recommendations that benefit end users. Catalyzed policy debates and proposed measures to enhance economic performance, trade efficiency, investment and financial flows in the region; conducted relevant training, including in WTO negotiation techniques. Annual surveys and forecasts of main economic and social variables are widely used; set up a network of national sources of reliable data and information. Analyzed/advised on the implications of WTO Trade and Environment Committee recommendations for strategically important regional exports; alerted the member countries concerned about the potential implications and the policy measures needed to safeguard national interests; provided a detailed study on the implications of WTO for tourism industry in the region; coordinated relevant activities of international organizations in the region. Organized the first Intergovernmental Committee meeting on Trade and Globalization and the first regional meeting to appraise past economic performance and priorities for the next decade, followed up by the expert group meetings on specific issues. Conducted an extensive assessment of privatization in selected ESCWA countries; prepared early warning indicators of economic performance and disseminated them to policy makers.
4. Coordination of policies and harmonization of norms and regulations for sectoral development To support national and regional efforts to harmonize sectoral policies within the context of emerging globalization trends and assist in setting and harmonizing relevant standards and norms. To disseminate information on developments in agriculture, industry, transport and science and technology. More harmonized sectoral policies in and among ESCWA member States; Wider adoption of standards and norms in the region. Better dissemination of information and data. Adoption of an integrated transport system in the Arab Mashreq (ITSAM) as a first step towards the development of a regional integrated transport system. Harmonization of national policies on maritime and air transport services in the region; progress towards harmonizing agricultural, industrial and science and technology policies in light of globalization and WTO Agreement. Assessed the employment impact of economic restructuring polices and provided relevant recommendations, particularly regarding small and medium enterprises. UN-EDIFACT standards for electronic data interchange implemented and TIR convention norms for transport of goods in transit adopted in some countries. Monitoring of the application of international standards with focus on environmental aspects of industry. National capacity building in selected ESCWA countries in regard to technical barriers to trade and WTO Agreement, with emphasis on applying international standards in manufacturing to export promotion. Reviews of industry, science and technology, along with agriculture and transport. Launching geographic information database to assess the impact of transport infrastructure on economic development.
5. Development coordination and harmonization of statistics and information To promote and implement international concepts, standards and classifications; to support the development of national statistical systems and their harmonization, regionally and internationally; to establish and develop regional authoritative statistical databases and information systems. Increased regional expertise and proficiency in implementing international statistical standards, concepts and methods; wider geographic and subject coverage of training; provision of harmonized economic and social statistics for the region; development and expansion of computerized databases. Training on international standards in national accounts, gender statistics, vital and civil statistics, environment, industrial and construction statistics for high level professionals. Developed national gender statistics programmes in the Arab countries; fostered awareness of gender issues and facilitated the development of strategies for improving gender statistics at the national and regional levels; prepared a pioneering study on women and men. Issued authoritative recurrent statistical publications based on harmonized national data; developed data essential for population projections and for estimating purchasing power parities. Expanded databases to include regional social indicators necessary for follow-up to global conferences and briefed Member States on related reporting requirements; supplied labour statistics to end users on executable files and CD ROMs; advanced towards creating a single umbrella database, linking it to the information system in Headquarters and making it accessible online.
Legislative review Intergovernmental bodies expressed appreciation of work done in regard to water and energy resources, social development, analysis of trade liberalization and economic globalization; commended progress made in regard to integrating transport systems and harmonizing official statistics.
External review and evaluation External evaluations of the relevance of work in general, of meetings/workshops, selected publications, and regional advisory services by end users and experts indicated, along with positive conclusions, that there is need to enhance awareness of ESCWA publications, improve their outreach through translation and to promote them innovatively to a wider audience; to target decision makers and to strengthen follow-up action. Content-wise, regional issues should be analysed in depth within a global context. The implementation of recommendations is under way. The OIOS review of ESCWA concluded that tangible improvements have been made towards focusing the programme of work and enhancing its relevancy to the objectives and to the needs of Member States.
Internal evaluation Self-evaluation of substantive divisions and regional advisory services underscored a need to employ innovative means for reaching end users and to deepen partnership with civil society institutions; revealed that political factors remain the major external constraint on implementing some of the recommendations aimed at furthering regional cooperation, while another negative externality is the paucity of timely, accessible and reliable statistical data. The regional advisory services needed a comprehensive plan of action; a mechanism to mobilize external expertise for specific projects and to focus on enhancing the effectiveness and timely delivery of services. These conclusions are being followed up.
Impact of reform and restructuring The far-reaching substantive reform of ESCWA was completed in 1996-1997. In the current biennium, the emphasis was on enhancing administrative efficiency by: human resources development through upgrading staff skills, particularly in computer proficiency; the effective implementation of IMDIS; the establishment of the United Nations House in Beirut which comprises five other UN agencies and the consequent provision of common services and development of cost-sharing formulas; and improvement of information technology and communications, regarding both hardware and software and addressing Y2K problem. Structural reforms included the merging of the Programme Planning and Coordination Unit and the Technical Cooperation Division to achieve greater synergy between normative and operational activities.

 

 

 

Section 22. Human rights – qualitative assessment of programme performance

Subprogramme 1. Right to development, research and analysis
Objectives 1. Developing a system-wide integrated strategy for the implementation of the right to development. 2. Expanding knowledge of human rights issues through research and analysis. 3. Enhancing the information technology capacities of human rights programme.
Assessment criteria Better system-wide coordination of support to the implementation of right to development. Inputs by studies and reports to understanding of human rights and adoption of new standards. Development of new information management tools.
Major benefits realized Better inter-agency cooperation in the area of development and human rights, including joint OHCHR-UNDP Human Rights Strengthening Programme (HURIST) incorporates a human rights dimension into the work of the UNDP at the country level. Stronger partnership with other development agencies, including the World Bank. New intergovernmental expert bodies facilitate implementation of right to development. Adoption by the GA of the Declaration on the rights and responsibilities to promote and protect human rights and freedoms. Analytical reports on the right to food and the right to education have established the way ahead and enabled the development of indicators to measure progress. Four databases became fully operational: for Treaty-Bodies, Charter-based Bodies, Press and Statements, and Internal Documents. The new digital registry serves as a management and dispatching tool, as an archive and a filing system. The OHCHR website gives access to all public documents in the databases; its average number of daily hits went up from 150 to 3,000.
Legislative review The General Assembly welcomed the establishment of a mechanism to monitor implementation of the right to development. The Commission on Human Rights (CHR) welcomed OHCHR analytical reports. The CHR took note with appreciation of the increased efforts by the Office to disseminate human rights information through its website.
Subprogramme 2. Supporting human rights bodies and organs
Objectives 1. To ensure the effective work of legislative and treaty bodies and the trust funds by timely and coordinated submission of documentation to them; by streamlining procedures and by strengthening liaison with major stakeholders. 2. To enhance the analytical capacity of treaty bodies in regard to the review of State party reports; to ensure their effectiveness in examination of petitions and communications.
Assessment criteria The timely, comprehensive and accurate delivery of substantive, logistical and informational inputs; efficient organization of the meetings; ability to absorb increased workload. Improved communication and sharing of experience among human rights organs/ bodies, and other partners. Better follow-up at various levels on the recommendations of human rights organs/bodies. Better appraisal of the human rights situation at the national level in conjunction with the review of State party reports. Timely provision of comprehensive analytical summaries concerning petitions and communications. More efficient use of information technology.
Major benefits realized (a) In relation to the treaty bodies: A 5% increase during the biennium in ratifications and accessions to the five main treaty bodies and an 11% increase in reports to them. Strengthened contacts between their Chairpersons. Inter-branch cooperation resulted in more comprehensive information submitted to treaty bodies and ensured more effective follow-up on their deliberations. Databases linking various parts of the human rights machinery facilitated access to information and enhanced the quality of work.

(b)In relation to the CHR and SC: Improved procedures for accreditation to human rights meetings. Follow-up on actions of human rights organs was enhanced by the preparation of detailed implementation charts. Stronger coordination with UNOG improved the flow of information.

(c) In relation to the voluntary funds: Contributions to and grants from the Fund for Victims of Torture increased to over $5 million; applications to the Fund went up by 30% in 1999. Increased contributions in 1999 to the Trust Fund on Slavery allowed $40,000 in grants in contrast to none in 1998. The number of applications approved under the Fund for Indigenous Populations grew from about 70 in 1998 to 250 in 1999.

Legislative review The General Assembly has noted with appreciation the plans of action to support treaty bodies and has noted with satisfaction the collaboration of the Fund for Victims of Torture with centres for the rehabilitation of torture victims.

 

Subprogramme 3. Advisory services, technical cooperation, support to human rights fact-finding procedures and field activities
Objectives 1. Supporting fact-finding bodies and effectiveness of human rights mechanisms 2. To ensure the effectiveness of field activities in cooperation with partners and stakeholders. 3. Assisting countries in the strengthening of national capacities for protecting and promoting human rights.
Assessment criteria A higher degree of satisfaction by legislative organs, by the holders of special mandates (HSM) (rapporteurs, experts, representatives, etc.) and by the Governments concerned Implementation of the mandate and objectives of the field missions and their contribution to the promotion and protection of human rights in the countries concerned. Increased capacity at the national level to promote and protect human rights; increased number of national action plans, including on human rights education; increased number of national human rights institutions.
Major benefits realised Increased cooperation and coordination among the country and thematic mechanisms was facilitated by introducing annual work plans for all of them aimed at mobilizing synergies within the Secretariat in support of these mandates. Relevant examples include: parallel annual meetings of HSM and chairpersons of treaty-based bodies, joint missions and urgent appeals by special rapporteurs; increased interaction between the special procedures mechanisms and other bodies; dialogue of HSM with the Third Committee of the General Assembly and the CHR. Field missions increased from 20 to 26 over the biennium and are increasingly placed in the framework of larger UN operations. Regional and subregional strategies are being developed to optimise field work Projects and activities in the area of technical cooperation have expanded to over 200 main activities in some 40 countries. The focus was on: developing national plans of action for human rights; legislative reforms; support to national human rights institutions; support to parliaments, justice, the military and police; treaty reporting; human rights education; strengthening of NGOs; and promotion of economic, social and cultural rights, and the rights of women.
Legislative review Meetings of special rapporteurs, held annually, report to the next session of the CHR. Consideration of annual reports by the CHR and the General Assembly CHR received annually in-depth reports of the Secretary General on these topics.
External review and evaluation Follow-up action is in progress on a comprehensive external management review of the voluntary trust funds carried out in November 1999. Audits identified serious problems in field operations and management took measures to tighten administrative and financial controls. Regular discussion with donors and beneficiaries at the sessions of human rights bodies, as well as monthly briefings with major stakeholders provide feedback for evaluations of key activities. A system-wide review of technical assistance in human rights area was carried out and the inter-agency process of implementing its recommendations is under way.
Internal evaluation and lessons learned The mechanism for the internal management review and acting on lessons learned includes Senior Policy Committee, Management Board, Project Review Committee and an Advisory Panel on Personnel Issues. A Methodology Team facilitates the review of field work of OHCHR.
Impact of the United Nations reform and restructuring The reform led to the system-wide integration of human rights activities and made human rights a built-in component in the areas of peace and security, development and humanitarian assistance. OHCHR has been working closely with members of the United Nations Development Group (UNDG) on the UN Development Assistance Framework (UNDAF) and the Common Country Assessment (CCA). OHCHR participated in the review of the implementation of the CCA and UNDAF and contributed, inter alia, by inputs to the CCA Indicator Framework. Regular participation by OHCHR in the UNDG and its working groups has resulted in advancement of the role of the right to development within the United Nations. OHCHR has also contributed to the development of guidelines for the integration of human rights in peacemaking, peacekeeping and peace building.

Section 23. Protection and assistance to refugees – qualitative assessment of programme performance

Subprogramme 1. International protection
Objectives 1. To advance the acceptance of legal instruments on refugees and statelessness; to promote the inclusion of provisions favourable to refugees and stateless persons in international and regional instruments and in national legislation. 2. To explore the development of further measures of international protection to all who need it; to promote refugee law and protection principles and to ensure the effective observance of refugee rights, especially regarding women and children. 3. To search for permanent solutions to the problems of refugees, especially through the elaboration of comprehensive and regional approaches for resolving refugee problems.
Assessment criteria Increased number of accessions. Number of advisory opinions given and provisions adopted. Better understanding of complex protection issues. Enhanced awareness/respect of refugee rights. A functional regional Plan of Action
Major benefits realized

As the result of a global campaign, eight additional States acceded to international legal instruments governing the status of refugees and stateless persons. UNHCR actively cooperated with the Council of Europe in the drafting of a Recommendation on the Prevention and Reduction of Statelessness which was adopted in September 1999. Advice on refugee legislation and status determination procedures, nationality and statelessness issues, and technical and advisory services on nationality laws and their implementation were provided to numerous States, with particular emphasis on Central/Eastern Europe, the former Yugoslavia and Central Asia.

Constructive expert discussions of complex protection issues focused on internally displaced persons and relevant capacity building. Training in refugee law and protection was provided to government and legal officials, peacekeepers and NGOs. An intensive consultative process to promote collaboration on strengthening refugee protection, especially in regard to women/children, was launched and broadened to ensure support from a wide range of non-state actors. Women Initiatives in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Rwanda and Kosovo applied community-based approaches to promoting refugee rights. A collaborative project, Action on the Rights of Children (ARC) enhanced, through comprehensive training , the capacity of UNHCR, governments and implementing partners to protect and care for children in emergency situations. In 1999, the ARC Steering Committee was expanded to include UNICEF and the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.

The UNHCR, together with other involved parties, fostered the practical formulation of various aspects, implementation of and modalities of follow-up on the Plan of Action addressing the problem of refugees, displaced persons, other forms of involuntary displacement and returnees in the countries of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) and relevant neighbouring States, which was agreed at the Geneva CIS Conference. Growing problems linked to population movements within CIS proved the perspicacity of the approach adopted through the CIS Conference process, and the need to pursue further efforts in that direction.
Subprogramme 2. Assistance
Objectives 1.To provide humanitarian assistance in an environmentally sound manner. 2. To enhance UNHCR's emergency preparedness and response mechanisms To promote collaborative ventures with other agencies, including development entities and international financial institutions, and to improve partnership with implementing partners.
Assessment criteria Progress in mainstreaming environmental concerns into UNHCR programmes. Improved emergency response capacity. Better inter-agency cooperation and working relationships with implementing partners.
Major benefits realized The progress achieved in mainstreaming environmental concerns in refugee operations was based on four key principles: integration of environmental concerns into programming; prevention before cure; cost-effectiveness; and local participation. Environmental principles were integrated into management and training tools. Practical means of enhancing capacity to respond promptly and effectively in emergency situations were developed, with emphasis on organizational arrangements for effective preparedness and response, and on introducing structures and procedures enabling timely and predictable mobilization of all necessary resources. System-wide coordination and cooperation, in particular with development agencies, was strengthened through formal agreements and memoranda of understanding, and further collaboration was explored with the focus on bridging the gap between humanitarian assistance and development. Efforts are under way to refocus and revitalize partnership with NGOs in the light of the changed circumstances under which humanitarian action is undertaken.

 

Legislative review The General Assembly noted with satisfaction an increased succession to international refugee protection documents, condemned all threats to the security and well-being of refugees and emphasized respect for principles of refugee protection. The UNHCR governing bodies endorsed efforts to strengthen international protection; welcomed continued efforts to develop and promote suitable responses to environmental concerns in refugee operations and endorsed ongoing revitalization of relations with NGOs.
External review and evaluation The progress in implementing the recommendations of the UN Board of Auditors, including on programme management issues such as improving the caseload management and statistics, ensuring that work plans are programme-specific and integrated with project planning and monitoring and strengthening control over implementing partners, is systematically reviewed by the Executive Committee. An external evaluation of UNHCR performance in the Kosovo crisis was submitted to the Standing Committee.
Internal evaluation

and lessons learned

Annual report on evaluation activities is presented to the UNHCR Executive Committee. In addition, a comprehensive review of the entire evaluation system was undertaken and resulted in a Plan of Action to enhance its efficiency. The Evaluation and Policy Analysis Unit, established in 1999, is responsible for drawing lessons learnt from evaluations and insuring that the best practices are reflected in programmes. Evaluation findings are systematically followed-up by the Senior Management Committee chaired by the High Commissioner. The ongoing decentralization and the introduction of the Operational Management System enhanced self-evaluation throughout UNHCR and compelled every Field Office and Headquarters unit to report on their performance against established objectives in the area of international protection and assistance. Internal controls were further strengthened by the work of the UNHCR Inspector-General, whose reports focus on concrete recommendations and promoting best practices. A reliable mechanism was put in place to monitor follow-up to inspection reports.
Impact of reform and restructuring UNHCR membership in the Executive Committees for Humanitarian Affairs (ECHA) and for Peace and Security (ECPS), which were created as part of the United Nations reform, made system-wide coordination more timely and effective. The revitalization of the Inter-Agency Standing Committee on humanitarian activities has had a similarly beneficial effect.

Section 24: Palestine refugees

Selected output/services provided during the biennium 1998-1999

Programme of activity

Yearly number of activities/users/beneficiaries

Envisaged

Implemented

 

1998-1999

1998

1999

1. Education      
(a) General education      
Provision of elementary, preparatory and secondary level education to eligible refugee children at UNRWA schools (number of children).

643 schools

436 169

650 schools

458 716

640 schools

468 651

(b) Vocational and professional training      
Provision of vocational, technical and teacher-training places in 8 training centres where 48 trade, technical and semi-professional courses are offered (number of places).

48 courses

4,666

50 courses

4 732

51 courses

4 764

Pre-service and in-service teacher training leading to a first level university degree at its training centres in Jordan and the West Bank (number of training places).

1,500

1 530

1 530

Provision of regular in-service training to teachers and other education staff.  

1 259

1 048

Provision of university scholarships per annum to eligible refugee children.

around 1,000

866

673

2. Health services      
(a) Medical care services      
Offering of comprehensive primary health care to eligible refugees through a network of 87 health centres, 23 health points and 14 maternal and child health clinics, which recorded some 6.5 million patient visits in 1997 (patient visits).

 

6.7million

 

6.7 million

 

6.7 million

Running of hospital in Kalkiliya in the West Bank (number of patients).

4 000

4 108

3 883

Provision of secondary care through financial support towards hospitalization of refugee patients (number of patients).

41 500

41 752

42 369

Provision of food assistance to the most vulnerable population groups, including children below two years of age, pregnant women and nursing mothers.  

99 900

105 000

Heath education and promotion.  

3

3 e

(b) Environmental health services      
Provision of basic environmental health services, including sewage disposal, management of storm-water run-off, safe drinking water, collection and disposal of refuse, control of rodents and insects to registered refugees living in camps.

1 .1 million

1.2 million

1.2 million

3. Relief and social services      
(a) Relief services      
Provision of direct material and financial assistance to those refugee families without an adult male medically fit to earn an income and without other identifiable means of meeting basic needs.

192 020

195 359

205 286

       
       
       
(b) Social Services      
Technical and financial support for: Skills training and support for income-generating enterprises (via grants and loans); rehabilitation of disabled persons; community development projects; women's literacy, legal awareness and other developmental programmes; youth activities and leadership training; social counselling individually and in groups where indicated, as additional support to clients of those programmes.

330 000

39 748

45 444 j

4. Income generation      
Developing activities in Gaza and the West Bank through the expansion of revolving loan funds (three in Gaza and two in the West Bank) to strengthen existing enterprises, create new job opportunities, improve the capacity of women entrepreneurs and support the poor through enterprise-based income generating activities

6 300

7 310 loans worth $8.65 million

9 252 loans worth $11.78 million

 

i The target group which is expected to benefit from social services programmes. Estimated as 10 per cent of total registered refugee population of 3.3 million in 1997.

j See paragraph 4 of the overview.

k Since the programme was established in 1991, up to 1999, the Agency has provided 26,757 enterprise loans valued at $38.87 million. The Agency's microfinance programmes

in the West Bank and Gaza have maintained annual repayment rates above 95 per cent, reaching 99.4 per cent in lending to women. Since 1997 the programme has been fully self-sustaining

and covers all its annual operational costs of $1.4 million from interest and lending fees.

l The envisaged annual outreach capacity at the level of 15-20 per cent of the enterprise population of 34,982 small businesses and microenterprises in the northern West Bank

and Gaza.

5. Through its income-generation programme, UNRWA expanded its microfinance activities through its two field offices in the West Bank and Gaza by opening two branch offices to establish outreach capacity to the poorest refugee communities.

 

Section 25. Humanitarian assistance – qualitative assessment of programme performance

Sub-

programmes

Objectives

Assessment criteria

Major benefits realized

1. Policy and analysis To focus on key policy issues of emergency assistance, including: (a) access to and the protection of victims in conflict; (b) enhancing the UN system’s capacity regarding internally displaced people (IDP); (c) improving the humanitarian interface with peacekeeping operations; (d) supporting relief and development linkages. To provide increasingly accurate early warning information. Extent to which all involved provide access to victims of conflict. Effective response of the UN system to specific new IDP situations. Existence of clear guidelines on and practical measures for integration of humanitarian and peace-keeping operations. Effective and seamless transition from relief to development. Agreements with warring parties in several countries to gain access for the delivery of relief supplies to affected populations. The Secretary-General’s report on the protection of civilians (S/1999/957) enhanced the international community’s recognition of the need to address all aspects of the legal and physical protection of the victims of conflict, especially the right of humanitarian access to those in need. The UN system’s response to the needs of IDPs was strengthened by adopting specific protection policies along with the Manual on Field Practices on Internal Displacement, as well as by advocacy in specific IDP situations. Improved interface between peacekeeping operations and humanitarian operations was reflected in the formal application of a Strategic Framework approach in two war-affected countries and through the informal application of the concept in three other countries. The humanitarian coordination responsibility was integrated into the structure of two major peacekeeping operations. Played a leading role in the system-wide efforts to address the relief/development gap in selected vulnerable countries.
2. Complex emergencies To ensure an appropriate, timely and effective response to ongoing and incipient complex emergencies;

to promote field-based strategic planning and coordination;

to mobilize resources of the donor community; and to ensure that UN policy-making organs take full account of the humanitarian dimension in their decision-making.

Positive donor response to appeals. Positive feedback from major stakeholders.

Effective operational coordination in the field.

Emphasis on humanitarian principles and priorities in policy statements and in implementation of multi-disciplinary field operations.

Better coordination and improved image of humanitarian operations. Development of humanitarian strategies, implementation of humanitarian principles,which led to better protection of the vulnerable populations and humanitarian access. Increased funding and improved credibility with donors through increased dialogue, frequent briefings and continuous feedback.

More intensive consultations with major stakeholders on the planning and coordination of humanitarian response mechanisms and their integration with political and peace-keeping initiatives. Increased donor involvement in needs assessment missions, monitoring and close involvement in setting Consolidated Appeal Process (CAP) strategies. Increased media involvement in World Humanitarian Day.

3. Natural disaster reduction To evaluate progress in disaster reduction during the past 10 years; to identify trends in natural hazards in order to project related risks into the 21st century; and to shape future directions for sustained international and interdisciplinary commitment to disaster prevention, by identifying crucial programme functions and essential institutional responsibilities. Acceptance of policy and technical advice. Tangible impact of campaigns on methodologies, strategies and means for effective early warning , disaster risk reduction and prevention. Enhanced shared knowledge and technological transfer regarding hazard, vulnerability and risk assessment . Annual thematic World Disaster Reduction Campaigns were observed in over 70 countries and included Internet conferences; the World Disaster Reduction Day was held in more than 100 countries. An interactive web site on disaster prevention and a Resource Centre provide comprehensive information and documentation to all Developed a system-wide functional structure and strategy for disaster reduction in the 21st century. Developed the ongoing UN system’s strategy on El Niño and facilitated the work of the respective Inter-Agency Task Force. Launched the Risk Assessment Tools for Diagnosis of Urban Areas against Seismic Disasters (RADIUS) Initiative; nine case study cities were selected and more than 100 cities participated in the overall project. Organized regional meetings which formulated recommendations for future efforts to ensure continued commitment to disaster prevention.
4. Disaster relief To assist in mobilizing/ coordinating international emergency relief to countries affected by natural or technological disasters and to develop ways to strengthen international response capacity. Effective international emergency response system. Reinforced logistics support to the field. The quality of information provided in situation reports. Total resources mobilized. The Disaster Response System consists of the following: issuance of situation reports, appeals for international assistance, fielding of UN Disaster Assessment and Coordination (UNDAC) teams to disaster-affected countries, and activation of International Emergency Response Networks to mobilize financial, human, technical, logistics and material resources. The effectiveness of this system is constantly being monitored by the international community and UN Resident Coordinators/UN Disaster Management Teams (DMTs) in disaster-affected countries. To achieve a more effective regional response, OCHA fielded Regional Disaster Response Advisers in the South Pacific, Asia and Latin America. They strengthened OCHA's links with UN Resident Coordinator’s offices in the field as well as Governments of disaster-affected countries. During 1998-1999, 139 disasters were registered, 54 international appeals and 388 situation reports were issued; and $1,351,000 were mobilized, of which $19 million were channelled through OCHA.
5. Humanitarian emergency information To provide timely and reliable information on humanitarian issues to the Emergency Relief Coordinator and to all actors of the international humanitarian community and the public at large in order to respond effectively to complex humanitarian emergencies and natural disasters; to support the development of policies responsive to these emergencies and their mitigation and to advocate important humanitarian causes. Effective engagement of interagency partners in early warning and contingency planning. Satisfaction with efficiency of information technology systems; its increased use. Frequency of visits to ReliefWeb and positive feedback from users.

Number and scope of high-level press statements, releases, publications, etc. on humanitarian issues.

The early warning responsibilities of the Framework Team were reformulated and its membership expanded to five more humanitarian agencies; reviews of over 20 country/regional situations that were considered at risk of a complex emergency were conducted. Up-to-date and reliable computer systems and software have enhanced the efficiency and intensity of information exchange and the development of shared databases facilitated collaboration. Integration between systems in NY and Geneva and the development of a publications database have enhanced the sharing of information among different OCHA branches. ReliefWeb has doubled its audience, receiving 1.5 million hits in 1998 and 3 million hits in 1999. A survey revealed that more than 60% of users work actively in the delivery of humanitarian assistance and include decision-makers, policy analysts, desk officers, donors and relief workers in national governments, UN agencies, international and non-governmental organizations. The media has also indicated regular use of ReliefWeb. In addition, many strategic information partnerships and information exchange agreements have been formed with these organizations, and ReliefWeb posts information from more than 400 of these sources and/or provides access and links to humanitarian information on these partner organizations web sites.
Legislative review Both the Economic and Social Council and the General Assembly conduct indirect assessments of the quality of programme delivery in the course of their deliberations on the emergency humanitarian and rehabilitation assistance activities of the UN system.
External review and evaluation The thrust of recommendations of numerous reviews by oversight bodies, including the Humanitarian Liaison Working Group (comprising the major donors) was to develop effective administrative and financial procedures addressing short- and long-term emergency response. Following up on it, a standing delegation of authority has been secured by OCHA to accept contributions and issue allotments for extrabudgetary resources and special arrangements made ensure the expeditious procurement of emergency equipment. Consideration is also being given to subcontract the administration of emergency field staff to UNOPS to ensure rapid deployment.

OIOS inspection concluded that the mechanism for humanitarian coordination has been strengthened, particularly at the field level, to ensure a coherent and effective approach to complex emergencies. To strengthen the UN system’s capacity for emergency response, the conclusion of bilateral agreements between operational agencies was encouraged. Measures were taken to enhance the consolidated appeals process as a mechanism for programming and monitoring. The improvements focused on better needs assessment, prioritized programming and establishment of mechanisms for monitoring the resource flow and implementation of country-level programmes.

To enhance further programme delivery, feedback from major stakeholders was elicited and donor involvement in needs assessment missions was increased; closer integration of humanitarian response mechanisms into the political and peacekeeping initiatives was pursued.

Internal evaluation The framework of internal evaluation consists of mid-term reviews and quarterly field monitoring exercises. The mid-term review provides analyses of progress made towards the achievement of programme goals and cross-cutting objectives including modification of such goals and sector objectives; the impact of the funding picture on the Common Humanitarian Action Plan, along with the identification of prioritized funding needs. The exercise contributes towards shaping the views and approaches that impact the planning of assistance strategies for the subsequent year. The quarterly field monitoring review is intended to achieve the same results as they relate to OCHA's field operations. In addition, a number of lessons learned exercises were conducted, which has been effectively drawn on in the planning and coordination of humanitarian operations. Evaluations highlighted both external inhibiting factors such as, in some cases, a lack of coherent approach in coordination or tardy donor response to emergency requirements, and the crucial internal one - shortage of core funding. An increasing number and magnitude of natural and man-made emergencies gave rise to a manifold increase in the Office's responsibilities, while its core resources were restrained by a very limited regular budget base, making short-term extrabudgetary funding a decisive resource. Effective programme delivery, particularly in respect of emergency humanitarian assistance, demands sufficient resources to enable it to function in a timely and effective manner. The growing gap between mandates and viable resources will have to be dealt with to enable the Office to focus on discharging its mandates instead of devoting too much time and energy on mobilizing resources. Lessons learned also lead to modifying rules and regulations in line with exigencies of humanitarian action. The delegation of authority in financial matters had positive effect, and granting the delegation of authority to recruit emergency personnel to meet the special requirements of emergency programmes should be similarly beneficial.
Impact of reform and restructuring The Secretary-General's reform has had a profound impact on the efficiency of programme delivery by eliminating ancillary tasks and focusing the efforts on three core functions: policy development, advocacy of humanitarian principles and coordination of emergency response, which were significantly strengthened, while operational aspects of the programme were redistributed to other parts of the UN system. The IASC, under the chair of the Emergency Relief Coordinator, was strengthened, thus enhancing a rapid response capacity based on coherent policy. The CAP was further improved, serving not only as a vehicle for resource mobilization in the humanitarian sector but as a tool for programme planning and prioritization. A humanitarian affairs segment of the ECOSOC was established to provide guidance on overall humanitarian issues and coordination. The reform has also equipped OCHA with a more appropriate support structure towards a strengthened capacity to respond to humanitarian crisis. The new structure could have benefited from more adequate regular budget funding.

 

 

 

Section 26. Public information – qualitative assessment of programme performance

Subprogrammes 1. Promotional services 2. Information services
Objectives Ensuring that the United Nations speaks with one voice about its common goals. Consolidating and expanding its world-wide outreach to core audiences to enhance an informed public understanding of the work of the United Nations and to counter misconceptions. Developing thematically integrated information strategies and activities and producing information materials about the work of the Organization. Meeting the increasing need for information on the activities of the Organization, the Secretary-General and senior officials. Providing timely and authoritative information to the media through the relevant divisions, the Office of the Spokesman of the Secretary-General and through UNICs to meet regional and local audience needs. Monitoring of international trends and events in the media, as well as media coverage of the Organization and the Secretary-General. Establishing an international radio broadcasting capacity
Assessment criteria Better co-ordination of public information programmes within the Secretariat and system-wide. Timely, accurate and targeted delivery of information to UN offices in the field and to key re-disseminators: media, educational institutions, government agencies and civil society, including NGOs, the private sector and youth organizations; optimal use of traditional media (print, radio, TV) and Internet. Closer integration of information strategies and activities with focus on UN role in furthering peace and security, economic and social development, democracy and human rights. Enhanced access for media and other audiences to UN news; provision of multilingual coverage and information through traditional media and the Internet. Timely information by the Spokesman to media representatives at Headquarters; timely and adaptable information support to the network of UN information centres to ensure their proactive media outreach in the field. Timely and effective guidance to the network of UN information centres and upgrading their access to modern communications technology. Prompt delivery to the Secretary-General and his senior aides of relevant media coverage of the UN issues. More effective and timely dissemination of UN news and information via radio to audiences in all parts of the world.
Major benefits realized A co-ordinating mechanism was developed with DPKO, DPA and OCHA to include public information as an integral part of each field mission. Public information outreach was coordinated system-wide through the Joint United Nations Information Committee and UNICs co-ordinated joint activities at the local and regional levels. The Secretary-General’s guidelines on UN Secretariat relations with the media were issued. A UN Web site was created to promote partnerships with business and civil society. The multilingual UN Web site for NGOs was upgraded. Quarterly communications workshops were held with the participation of NGO representatives. The annual UN World Television Forum was held with broadcasters from over 80 countries. The CNN World Report held a session at HQ, featuring the Secretary-General in a live broadcast town-hall meeting. The Secretary-General and senior officials briefed leading American editors and journalists at two meetings at HQ. More than a million visitors took part in briefings and guided tours conducted in 20 languages. UN peacekeeping was publicized through, e.g., photo exhibitions at HQ and other locations world-wide, an interactive Web page, e-mail session with 140 schools world-wide and UN peace-keeping personnel. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was promoted through, e.g., a multilingual Web site, pro bono advertisements in in-flight magazines of eight airlines; film festival at HQ; celebrities’ visits to HQ; radio series, live interviews and public service announcements in 15 languages. Enhancement of the UN Web site in all official languages and utilization of new communications technologies give faster access to a wider audience to UN news (text, audio and video). The creation of the UN News Service Web site; high-quality audio, video and photos on demand; digital photos dispatched directly to users; downloadable multilingual audio news files; five TV documentaries on children co-produced; "UN in Action" series distributed by over 100 broadcasters world-wide. Significant long-term efficiencies were achieved by consolidating DPI’s audio, film, video and photo units into a single unit. The UN Web site provides live broadcast of the Noon Briefing of the Spokesman and highlights in text, by 2 P.M. daily. On Fridays, the Spokesman provides an overview of newsworthy UN events for the forthcoming week. The network of UN information centres increased their public information activities, especially on priority issues, such as peacekeeping, youth and education. UNICs are now fully computerized. Thirty UNICs have developed their own Web sites in 15 languages. This was achieved despite the loss of 9 professional, 6 national information officers and 23 general service posts in UNICs. Over 30 per cent of UNIC staff received training locally, and DPI organized briefings and training at Headquarters for centre directors and librarians. The News Distribution Online, posted on Intranet, offers 4 different news clippings services. All Member States have been contacted regarding possible extrabudgetary support for the international radio broadcasting pilot project.

 

Sub-

programmes

3. Library services 4. Publication services
Objectives Providing library services and research facilities to internal and external users, including through the most effective electronic services. Continuous development of an accessible archival system of UN documents and publications. Upgrading the system of UN depository libraries. Providing essential authoritative recurrent and non-recurrent publications. Enhancing outreach by targeting general readership. Timely and effective dissemination and marketing of UN publications.
Assessment criteria Continuous modernization of the Dag Hammarskjöld Library (DHL). Implementing the Integrated Library Management System (ILMS) for all UN Libraries and designing a "virtual library" allowing remote access to full-text information. Implementing linkage between the UN Bibliographic Information System (UNBIS) and the optical disk system (ODS) to create a complete interactive UN documentation resource. Upgrading the network of 365 UN depository libraries in all regions and providing stronger linkages among them. Enhanced marketability, cost-effectiveness and timeliness of authoritative publications reflecting UN role. Employing modern communication technologies to widen outreach to new audiences. Tangible improvements in dissemination, promotion and sales of UN publications through all available channels
Major benefits realized DHL automated all of its processes through ILMS. Multilingual Intranet and Internet web sites (UNBIS Thesaurus and the UN system Pathfinder). UNBISNET, the Library’s major database, was launched at the end of 1999. The digitization of UN documents retrospectively from microfiche for uploading to ODS is in progress. DHL organized four regional training workshops for UN depository librarians with emphasis on access to electronic information. Investment in hardware and software upgrades and staff training brought about improvements in content and visual appeal of publications. The backlog of the UN Yearbook has been eliminated through advanced production methods. New and improved web site editions of the UN Chronicle, Africa Recovery and Development Business. The UN Publications Web site doubled sales of publications in 1999. Continued expansion of marketing and promotional ventures with UN agencies. The renovation of the UN Bookstore at HQ resulted in an increase in sales of approximately 20 per cent over 1998.
Legislative review The General Assembly appreciated the efforts to strengthen DPI's public information capacity for peacekeeping, development-related and other priority issues; appreciated the efforts to develop and enhance the UN Web sites in all six official languages; reaffirmed the important role of UNICs in effectively disseminating information in all parts of the world; and appreciated the efforts to move DHL in the direction of a virtual library.
External review and evaluation The most recent OIOS evaluation confirmed that DPI strengthened its function as provider of services to information agencies and other disseminators; streamlined its priorities and enhanced its overall coordination; ensured that responses to media coverage are more coherent and prompt; expanded its outreach to target audiences; made energetic efforts to diversify its audio-visual materials and improved the content and timeliness of materials for the press; strengthened support to UNICs and to the media at the regional and local levels; intensified its outreach to NGOs; and significantly improved access to UN documentation through library services. OIOS recommended that a procedure for peer review of technical publications be established.
Internal evaluation and lessons learned Internal evaluations focused on feedback from users, redisseminators and experts. Among them: survey questionnaires on various DPI publications and on the Daily Press Clippings; an evaluation of the 1998 edition of Basic Facts about the United Nations; and a survey of NGO representatives. Two surveys are in progress: a case-by-case review of the 14 UNICs integrated with UNDP field offices and a survey of the pilot project for the establishment of a UN international radio broadcasting capacity. Based on the evaluation findings, measures were taken to adjust the activities, balancing the needs of target audiences with available resources.
Impact of the United Nations reform and restructuring The UN reform process has placed information and communications at the centre of the Organization’s work. In that regard, the Task Force on the Reorientation of Public Information Activities was reconvened on 6 May 1999. Outreach activities to media and civil society were expanded through improvements in productivity, primarily through emphasis on the use of the Internet along with technological advances in dissemination through traditional media. The coordination function within DPI was strengthened by the establishment of the strategic communications planning group and within the Secretariat through systematic interdepartmental consultations, including in the Communications Group.

Section 27 A

Office of the Under-Secretary-General for Administration and Management

Subprogramme 2

Financial management, contributions and treasury

Output/service by subprogramme Programmed

Number provided

 

1998-1999

1998

1999

Parliamentary services:
(i) Substantive servicing of the Fifth Committee on matters related to contributions, financial management and other financial questions

* /

1a/

1b/

(ii) Substantive servicing of annual sessions of the Committee on Contributions and other bodies on questions related to contributions

*/

1c/

1d/

(iii) Provision of support to pledging conferences for a variety of United Nations activities (2 annually)

*/

2

2

Parliamentary documentation:
Annual reports and ad hoc reports as required to the General Assembly on:

(i) The financial situation of the Organization (2 annually)

*/

2

2

(ii) Issues relating to the financial reports and audited financial statements and reports of the Board of auditors e/

*/

3

4

(iii) The scale of assessments

Documentation for the Committee on Contributions

*/

25f/

28g/

(iv) Notes on JIU elections

*/

2

 
Published Material: Technical material  
Monthly and ad hoc reports on the status of contributions-- and response to ad hoc requests

*/

12

12

Administrative support services:  
(i) Monitoring of the financial situation of the Organization, in particular with respect to the cash-flow situation, and developing strategies to deal with related problems

*/

As required

 
(ii) Review of reports by the external auditors, the Office of Internal Oversight Services and the Joint Inspection Unit and follow-up on audit observations and control issues

*/

h/

(iii) Cooperation with other organizations of the United Nations system to exchange views and ensure a common approach

*/

i/

 
(iv) Assessment of contributions of Member States to the United Nations regular budget and for the financing of peacekeeping operations and international tribunals (approximately 120)

*/

71

60

(v) Assessment of contributions by non-member States for their participation in United Nations activities

*/

1

1

(vi) Providing briefing material on the status of contributions for the Office of the Secretary-General

*/

j/

j/

(vii) Briefings to the Security Council Committee established pursuant to Security Council resolution 661 (1990)

k/

l/

m/

(viii) Administration of bank accounts in New York and away from headquarters

-- Opening

-- Closing

*/

85

425

182

443

(ix) Establishment of United Nations operational rates of exchange and monitoring international currency exchange markets n/

*/

o/

p/

(x) Short-term investments:

(Competitive quotes taken daily of interest rates and planning for cash requirements resulted in constant monitoring and dialogue)

*/

10 782

13 341

(xi) Investing funds for short-term periods for the United Nations regular budget, peacekeeping operations, United Nations general trust funds, technical cooperation funds, UNEP and other funds, Investments for the Oil-for-Food Programme

--Year-end

--Balance

--Volume

--FX No.

--FX $ volume

--EFT No.

*/

 

 

5 000 000 000

295 800 000 000

351

414 000 000

6 266

 

 

11 200 000 000

271 600 000 000

430

631 000 000

6 434

(xii) GAINS interest earned on cash concentration account at Chase

*/

9 469 000

10 321 000

(xiii) Cash management - enhancements to payment statements including EFT and ACH testing: Installation, testing, conversion, pilot computer programmesq/

*/

r/

s/

(xiv) Receiving and recording all payments, other than government contributions, effecting all disbursements under the responsibility of Headquarters and maintaining liaison with banks

--Non-payroll cheque payments

--Non-payroll EFT payments

--Payroll payments

--Receipting

*/

 

 

39 723

21 372

173 435

9 831

 

 

41 433

21 418

176 478

8 525

(xv) Receiving and recording government contributions and issuance of receipts (CRVs)

*/

2 862

2 690

* Not programmed to programme budget 1998-1999.

Section 27A. – Office of the Under-Secretary-General for Management – qualitative assessment of programme perfomance

Subprogramme 1. Administration of justice
Objectives To facilitate the functioning of the internal justice system. To ensure the effective disposition of staff grievances, through informal and formal means, and the speedy handling of disciplinary cases.
Assessment criteria

Decisions on appeals and disciplinary cases that are fair and conform to the Organization’s policies and rules. Speedy settlement of appropriate staff grievances and timely disposition of appeals through the formal recourse procedures. Quick, efficient and fair disposition of disciplinary cases.

Major benefits realized

An efficiently functioning system of administration of justice which impacts positively on staff morale.

Subprogramme 2. Financial management, contributions and Treasury
Contributions
Objectives To facilitate Member States’ discussion and decision on an equitable scale of assessment. To improve the timeliness of receipt of assessed and voluntary contributions. To enhance the timeliness and quality of management information and reporting to Member States. To facilitate intergovernmental consideration of measures to overcome the financial problems of the UN.
Assessment criteria

Provision of adequate and timely documentation and substantive and technical support for the Committee on Contributions and the Fifth Committee in their consideration of the scale of assessments and of measures to improve the financial situation of the UN. Timely issuance of assessments to Member States and periodic reminders of pledged voluntary contributions. Use of computerized information on the status of contributions to provide up-to-date information to management and, on request, to Member States, usually on a same day basis.

Major benefits realized

Improvement of the financial situation of the UN is primarily dependent on action by Member States, but effective information and support by the Secretariat can facilitate or encourage such action. The collection of assessed contributions has shown a steady improvement in terms of the number of Member States paying in full or reducing their arrears to the Organization.

Treasury
Objectives To ensure the timely receipt and safe custody of cash resources. To improve payment systems in order to streamline processing. To reduce costs and enhance control mechanisms that protect payment systems and assets. To ensure that cash concentration benefits are achieved.  
Assessment criteria

Safeguarding the funds of the UN. Earning interest through conservative and prudent investments.

Major benefits realized

An investment software package (OPICS) was implemented, allowing the management of a wider variety of financial instruments and ensuring greater transparency. Best practices documents have strengthened cash and check management procedures throughout the UN system.

Oversight support
Objectives To improve and strengthen financial management and internal control. To maintain close liaison and follow-up with the Board of Auditors, the Office of Internal Oversight Services and the Joint Inspection Unit.
Assessment criteria Number of observations made and accepted and number implemented. To identify trends and areas for follow-up based on the composite findings of the various oversight bodies.
Major benefits realized Timely preparation of parliamentary documentation and enhanced cooperation and coordination with oversight bodies regarding implementation and follow-up of their recommendations. Better adherence to established standards and procedures.
 
Internal evaluation and lessons learned All activities carried out under this section are reviewed on a weekly basis through an internal overview conducted by the Under-Secretary-General. Particular attention has been paid in this regard to the achievement of the various reform measures.

The database on contributions is used to analyse current situation against results achieved in prior years. Implementation of systems designed to enhance accountability and the development of common policies in the context of the Financial Services Working Group. Evaluation of activities in support of peace-keeping, the Oil-for-Food Programme and the United Nations General Trust Funds has been accomplished over the course of several audits.

External Review and Evaluation The Administrative Tribunal’s judgements of cases provide external review of the administration of justice. Audits were carried out on the work of the Contributions Service and Treasury and were factored into the work of these offices.
Impact of reform and restructuring The reform programme enabled the Department of Management to gradually shift its focus to the reform goals of policy development and monitoring, away from processing. The newly established Management Policy Office, in particular, ensures that appropriate managerial policies are in place across the Secretariat and best managerial practices are implemented. Common policies and best practices: in the reporting period, Treasury initiated and completed the development of Common Principles and Policies for Investments. This document was approved by the UNDP Investment Committee and was issued as an official document of the Financial Services Working Group on 22 November 1999.

Section 27 B

Office of Programme Planning, Budget and Accounts

Output/service by subprogramme Programmed

Number provided

 

1998-1999

1998

1999

Subprogramme 1.

Financial accounting and reporting

     
Administrative support services:      
(i) Financial accounts:      
Processing of various financial and accounting documents

* /

493 402

1 643 669

(ii) Payments and disbursements:      
Payment of salaries and related allowances and other benefits to United Nations staff, consultants and United Nations fellows

*/

11 931

12 810

Purchase or renewal of major commercial insurance policies

*/

17

17

(iii) Negotiation of health and life insurance contracts.

*/

7

7

Number of enrolments of staff in medical, dental and life insurance (all categories of staff including retired staff).

*/

43 195

42 410

Administration of insurance policies covering United Nations property and third-party liability.

*/

15

15

(iv) Number of claims reviewed for submission to the United Nations Claims Board and the Advisory Board on Compensation Claims.

*/

259

158

Subprogramme 2.

Programme planning and budgeting

     
(a) Parliamentary services:      
(i) Parliamentary documentation:      
Proposed outline of the programme budget for the biennium 1998-1999 (1998).

1

1

0

Revised appropriation for the programme budget for the biennium 1998-1999.

1

1

0

Approved appropriations for the programme budget for the biennium 1996-1997, 1998-1999, 2000-2001.

*/

2

1

Budget performance reports for the biennium 1998-1999.

*/

1

1

Reports to the Fifth Committee of the General Assembly on the programme budgets for the bienniums 1996-1997 and 1998-1999.

*/

24

16

Proposed revisions to the medium-term plan for the period 1998-2001.

*/

1

0

Proposed programme budget for the biennium 2000-2001.

1

0

1

Reports to the Assembly on administrative and budgetary matters, as required.

*/

7

17

(ii) Substantive services to the Committee for Programme and Coordination, the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions and the Fifth Committee of the General Assembly.

*/

390

448

(b) Administrative support services and finance      
(i) Review of draft resolutions and decisions before the General Assembly, the Economic and Social Council and their subsidiary bodies and preparation and presentation to those bodies of statements of programme budget implications and revised estimates.

*/

273

372

Preparation of revised estimates arising from decisions of the Security Council.

*/

2

1

Preparation of the budgets and performance reports of the International Tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia since 1991 and the International Criminal Tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons responsible for Genocide and Other Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of Rwanda and Rwandan Citizens responsible for Genocide and Other Such Violations Committed in the Territory of Neighbouring States between 1 January and 31 December 1994.

*/

5

5

Preparation of instructions for proposed programme budget for the biennium 2000-2001; and annual budgets of ICTY and ICTR

*/

3

2

Preparation of instructions for the second performance reports on the programme budget for the biennium 1998-1999, and performance reports for ICTY and ICTR

*/

2

3

Review and analysis of cost plans for extrabudgetary financing

*/

341

336

(ii) Issuance of authorizations, guidelines or instructions with a view to improving administrative and financial procedures and rationalizing the use of resources

*/

45

75

Review and analysis of trust fund proposals and the establishment of their terms of reference and agreements with contributors

*/

16

6

Review of programme budget implications of host-country agreements for meetings held away from established headquarters

*/

5

9

Review of financial and budgetary issues in draft reports to the General Assembly, the Economic and Social Council and their subsidiary bodies

*/

27

39

Issuance of allotment advices and staffing table authorizations

*/

1 160

1 596

Monitoring of expenditures, review of proposals for revisions to allotment advices and preparation of requests for supplementary estimates

*/

842

1 019

Preparation of requests for authorization to incur unforeseen and extraordinary expenditures

*/

9

18

Maintenance of vacancy statistics and certifying officers’ panel

*/

12

191

12

201

(iii) Maintenance and operation of computerized budget system and management of data structure, data input and system control

*/

1

9

Creation of standard cost tables

*/

6

7

Subprogramme 3.

Financial services relating to peacekeeping matters

     
(a) Parliamentary services: Parliamentary documentation:      
Performance and financing reports to the General Assembly of active, completed, and closed missions; new missions authorized by the Security Council; reports on administrative and budgetary aspects of peacekeeping activities (rates of reimbursement for troop-contributing Governments, the peacekeeping reserve fund, the support account for peacekeeping operations, the United Nations Logistic Base in Brindisi, etc.)

*/

56

42

Sections of reports to the Security Council on the financing of all peacekeeping operations, as required

*/

33

41

Letters to ACABQ - Commitment Authority and additional information

*/

31

77

(b) Administrative support services
(i) Budget formulation      
Review and analysis of performance reports and cost estimates for the financing of individual peacekeeping operations including the reports on administrative and budgetary aspects (rates of reimbursement, the peacekeeping reserve fund, the support account for peacekeeping operations, the United Nations Logistics Base at Brindisi).

*/

56

42

Review of draft agreements and cost plans to be financed from the trust funds established for peacekeeping/peacemaking operations and preparation of reports to donors

*/

22

35

Support to the Fifth Committee and the plenary (Draft resolutions/decisions, reports of the Fifth Committee)

*/

46

46

Review and verification of data generated by the Department of Peacekeeping Operations on annually updated standard ratios and Standard Cost Manual (including mission-specific costs) used in the formulation of peacekeeping operation budgets.

*/

1

1

(ii) Budgetary control:  
Issuance and revision of allotments and staffing table authorizations

*/

322

305

Processing of IMIS transactions for allotments and post management

*/

30 746

29 760

(iii) Monitoring of financial status:
Review of certified government claims and confirmation of availability of funds

(Troops/Contingency of equipment/Letter of Assist/Death and Disability) and preparation for payment and subsequent notification to troop-contributing Governments

*/

683

334

Constant monitoring of cash levels of individual peacekeeping operations special accounts and projected cash flow requirements

*/

252

252

Monthly determination of troop strength and the amounts payable to each troop-contributing Government

*/

120

120

Monitoring and use of the peacekeeping reserve fund pursuant to the provisions of General Assembly resolution 49/233 A

*/

16

23

(iv) Rates of reimbursement formulation:

*/

38

38

Section 27B. Office of Programme Planning Budget and Accounts – qualitative assessment of programme performance

Subprogramme 1. Financial accounting and reporting
Objectives To record and maintain all accounts of the United Nations on a fund basis; to control the collection of monies and assist in the monitoring of expenditures and the financial assets of the Organization. To ensure the proper application of the Financial Regulations and Rules and established procedures relating to accounting matters and to effect timely and accurate payment of the financial obligations of the Organization, including payroll. To co-ordinate and supervise all health, life, property and liability insurance activities of the Organization as well as to provide services to the Claims Board and the Advisory Board on Compensation Claims.
Assessment criteria

The findings of the Internal and External Auditors. Client satisfaction: Governments, vendors, legislative and expert bodies and UN Boards, UN clients and individual staff members.

Major benefits realized

A Board of Auditors’ certified accounting system that facilitated: an effective financial control environment; the generation of accurate and timely accounting data (greatly enabling the informed decision-making capabilities of management as well as expert and legislative bodies); and, the efficient and timely processing of payments, including payroll.

Subprogramme 2. Programme planning and budgeting
Objectives To prepare and present to the legislative bodies: the Secretary-General's budget outline; the biennial programme budget; the medium-term plan; budget performance reports and other reports on budgetary matters including revised or supplementary programme budget proposals. To develop integrated programme planning and budgeting policies, procedures and methodologies, consistent with the Financial Regulations and Rules and the Regulations and Rules Governing Programme Planning, the Programme Aspects of the Budget, the Monitoring of Implementation and the Methods of Evaluation on matters related to the programme budget and extrabudgetary resources. To maintain budget control and reporting systems pertaining to the implementation of programme budgets, medium-term plans and extrabudgetary funds; including, the authorization of allotments and staffing tables. To provide substantive services to the Fifth Committee and other Committees of the General Assembly, the Economic and Social Council and its subsidiary bodies, the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions and the Committee for Programme and Coordination.
Assessment criteria

Timely preparation and submission of the above-mentioned documentation; the content of which clearly and consistently reflects the Secretary-General’s programme and policy goals while addressing the recommendations and directives of the expert and legislative bodies within the framework established by the Financial Regulations and Rules and the Regulations and Rules Governing Programme Planning, the Programme Aspects of the Budget, the Monitoring of Implementation and the Methods of Evaluation. Timely and appropriate provision of programme planning and budgetary information, informing the review and decision-making capabilities of management as well as expert and legislative bodies.

Major benefits realized

In addition to the timely preparation and high-quality submission of the above-mentioned documentation, that facilitated the making of a number of decisions of the General assembly (including 53/205, 53/206, 53/207, 53/212, 53/213, 53/214, 53/215, 54/15, 54/20, 54/236, 54/239, 54/240, 54/247, 54/249, 54/250, 54/251, 54/252, 54/253) the Secretary-General’s proposal on results-based budgeting was developed and reports were submitted at the 52nd, 53rd and 54th sessions of the General Assembly, through the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions. A detailed handbook has been produced for Secretariat use. Prototype results-based budget presentations have been made for 5 sections of the programme budget 2000-2001 and await detailed review by ACABQ. The 2000-2001 programme budget incorporates "expected accomplishments".

Subprogramme 3. Financial services relating to peacekeeping matters
Objectives To prepare and present to the legislative bodies: the Secretary-General's annual peacekeeping budgets and performance reports; related liquidation budgets and reports on the disposition of assets; annual reports on the support account for peacekeeping operations, and other reports concerning administrative and budgetary aspects of the financing of peacekeeping operations. To monitor the cash flow status of the special accounts for peacekeeping operations; to authorize payments to Governments for the settlement of certified death and disability, contingent-owned equipment and letters of assist claims; with regard to troop cost reimbursement of Governments, to determine average monthly troop strengths, establish amounts reimbursable and initiate payments. To refine and establish policies, procedures and methodologies for estimating resource requirements; to provide policy guidelines, consistent with the Financial Regulations and Rules, on matters relating to the financing of peacekeeping operations. To provide substantive services to the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions and the Fifth Committee of the General Assembly on peacekeeping financing issues.
Assessment criteria

Timely preparation and submission of the above-mentioned documentation; the content of which is improved and clearly and consistently reflects the Secretary-General’s peacekeeping goals while addressing the recommendations and directives of the expert and legislative bodies within the framework established by the Financial Regulations and Rules on matters relating to the financing of peacekeeping operations. Timely and appropriate provision of peacekeeping financing information, informing the review and decision-making capabilities of management as well as expert and legislative bodies.

Major benefits realized

Improved quality of peacekeeping submissions (and supporting information) to the General Assembly, through the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions. This improvement is the result of a new and ongoing self evaluation mechanism established in early 1998; this mechanism focuses on the budget submission, review, preparation and submission process, as well as the content, format and presentation of the performance reports and proposed budgets for the peacekeeping missions. There were three significant outcomes of the improved mechanism: (1) the budget submission and review process was streamlined and enhanced to enable the direct participation of mission officials and to place greater emphasis on field submissions (feedback from these officials shows that they feel greater ownership of, and accountability for, their budgets and also have a better understanding of how the budget review process worked); (2) the content, format and presentation of the Secretary-General’s performance reports (for the period 1 July 1997 to 30 June 1998) and proposed budgets (for the period 1 July 1999 to 30 June 2000) for the individual peacekeeping operations was significantly improved, as was the timeliness of these submissions (better explanations of expenditures incurred, reduced unencumbered balances and more realistic and better justified budget estimates); (3) at the 53rd resumed session in May 1999 the General Assembly approved, on the recommendation of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions, without change, all of the Secretary-General’s proposed peacekeeping budgets for individual missions with the exception of one mission.

External review and evaluation

The principal outputs (as well as the supplementary information- generating capabilities) of the Office of Programme Planning Budget and Accounts, including: financial reports and financial statements, the Secretary-General's budget outline, the biennial programme budget, the medium-term plan, budget performance reports and other reports on budgetary and financial matters are subject to the intensive review and evaluation by the United Nations Board of Auditors, the Fifth Committee and other Committees of the General Assembly, the Economic and Social Council and its subsidiary bodies, the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions and the Committee for Programme and Coordination. The ongoing financial and budget management work of the Office of Programme Planning Budget and Accounts is subject to an annual audit by the External Auditors of the United Nations. As a matter of course, the findings, recommendations and decisions of all these external review, evaluation and legislative bodies is factored into the work of the Office of Programme Planning Budget and Accounts.

Internal evaluation and lessons learned

The most important development initiated and implemented within the Office of Programme Planning Budget and Accounts, other than those described as part of the Secretary-General’s reform and restructuring programme, concerned the drive to improve the quality of peacekeeping submissions (and supporting information) to the General Assembly, through the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions. The "major benefits realized" from this development are described under subprogramme 3 above. This improvement resulted from a new and ongoing self-evaluation mechanism established in early 1998. Greater care and attention is now given within the Office of Programme Planning Budget and Accounts to the content, format and presentation of the performance reports and proposed budgets for peacekeeping missions. The budget preparation, submission and review process has been streamlined and enhanced to enable the direct participation of mission officials and to place greater emphasis on field submissions. Feedback from these officials shows that they feel greater ownership of, and accountability for, their budgets and also have a better understanding of how the budget review process works.

Impact of reform and restructuring

As can be seen from the "objectives", "assessment criteria" and "major benefits realized" categories, the Secretary-General’s reform and restructuring objectives are considered an integral component of the work of the Office of Programme Planning Budget and Accounts. During the 1998-1999 biennium, the Secretary-General’s proposal on results-based budgeting was developed and reports were submitted at the 52nd, 53rd and 54th sessions of the General Assembly, through the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions. A detailed handbook has been produced for Secretariat use and prototype results-based budget presentations have been made for 5 sections of the programme budget 2000-2001 and await detailed review by ACABQ. Furthermore, the 2000-2001 programme budget incorporates "expected accomplishments". During 1999, the Office of Programme Planning Budget and Accounts also began a pilot project aimed at streamlining the processing of travel claims and the payment of entitlements relating to the shipment and insurance of personal effects. This project utilizes recent developments in automated processing and has decreased processing time and the backlogs in these administrative areas. The Office of Programme Planning Budget and Accounts anticipates that a number of the lessons learned during this exercise will be relevant to the processing and payment of other claims and entitlements.

Section 27C:

Office of Human Resources Management

Output/service by subprogramme

Programmed

Number provided

 

1998-1999

1998

1999

1. Parliamentary services:      
(a) Parliamentary documentation:      
Preparation of status report on the implementation of the strategy for the management of the Organization’s human resources

*/

 

a

Preparation or coordination of reports on the full range of human resources management issues

*/

 

b

(b) Substantive services: Participation in the deliberations of the main committees and subsidiary bodies (Committee for Programme and Coordination) and expert bodies (Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions) of the General Assembly on matters pertaining to human resources management

*/

 

c

Subprogramme 1.

Human resources planning and management of information

     
1. Parliamentary services      
Parliamentary documentation:      
Annual reports to the General Assembly on the composition of the Secretariat, as well as reports to the Assembly on the implementation of the strategy for human resources management and the introduction of proposed new or amended policies and practices

*/

 

d

2. Administrative support services -      
Human resources management      
(a) Planning and development      
(i) Development and implementation of mechanisms to systematically identify and forecast staffing needs in the Secretariat, including succession planning for selected key posts

*/

   
(ii) Development of improved standards for the recruitment and promotion of staff, such as definition of managerial and functional competencies

*/

   
(iii) Implementation of the enhanced attrition/voluntary separation programme and development of proposals for the longer-term management of staff separation and retention programmes, including the future use of agreed separation agreements  

28

30 j

(iv) Gathering and analysis of data in the monitoring and evaluation of the delegation of authority to programme managers for selected personnel matters with a view to identifying areas where authority could be further delegated within the safeguards of managerial accountability and monitoring and audit by the Office of Human Resources Management

*/

   
b) Maintenance and development of data systems
(i) Liaison with the IMIS team regarding the human resources management components of IMIS and identification and design of further enhancements to IMIS

*/

   
(ii) Design of computer applications in support of human resources planning and development of systems for further automation of human resources management processes

*/

   
(iii) Provision of the IMIS help desk function to all offices at Headquarters, including advisory services to staff in executive offices and divisions of administration in offices away from Headquarters with respect to operations of the personnel functionalities within IMIS

*/

   
Subprogramme 2.

Operational services

Parliamentary services:
(a) Parliamentary documentation:
Provision of data and reports on human resources issues, including human resources planning, contractual status of personnel (ratios of career and fixed-term appointments), voluntary separation programmes, hiring of retirees, use of consultants and gender balance

*/

 

r

(b) Substantive services:
Participation in the deliberations of the Fifth Committee of the General Assembly on matters related to human resources planning, recruitment and staff administration

*/

 

s

2. Administrative support services:
(a) Vacancy management
(i) Information gathering on projected staff movements or programmatic changes for the offices served by the various clusters, with the assistance of IMIS

*/

 

t

(ii) Identifying short-term staffing and skills needed for the offices served by the various clusters

*/

 

u

(iii) Issuance of vacancy notices and bulletins for specific vacancies

*/

700

650

(iv) Interviews and screening of external candidates and staff for the filling of vacancies

*/

33,000

29,000

(b) Recruitment, placement and promotion of Professional staff
(i) Long-term recruitment of approximately 200 Professional staff per year for posts subject to geographical distribution

--Initial appointments of Professional and GS staff

-- Modifications of appointment of Professional and GS staff.

-- Extensions of appointment (in collaboration with Executive Offices) of Professional and GS staff.

-- Reappointments of Professional and GS staff

*/

883

227

7,524

1,020

1,532

204

6,267

1,317

Preparation of internal and external vacancy announcements and advertisements

*/

660

600

Submission of lists of qualified candidates to departments

*/

 

v

Interviews of candidates in cooperation with departments

*/

v

v

Presentation of the recommendation for recruitment of candidates to the appointment and promotion bodies

-- Professional and D-1 staff

*/

151

147

Requests for government releases and visas. Partial assistance (with Executive Offices) :

*/

161

177

Arrangements of travel when appropriate

*/

60

 
(ii) Short-term recruitment of approximately 1,500 staff per year for short-term and conference requirements

*/

556

 
(iii) Recruitment of approximately 350 staff per year for humanitarian missions.

*/

20

25

(iv) Processing of approximately 1,000 special service agreements for consultants and individual contractors annually

-- Persons

-- Contracts

*/

798

2,150

937

2,383

(v) Placement and promotion of approximately 250 Professional staff annually (staff at the Professional and D-1 levels)

*/

363

333

(c ) Recruitment and placement of General Service and other categories of staff
(i) Acknowledgement and evaluation of approximately 10,000 applications per year

*/

10,000

10,000

(ii) Issuance of vacancy notices as required

*/

145

154

(iii) Communications with prospective candidates: 6,000 letters and 25,000 telephone inquiries each year concerning employment opportunities for General Service and other categories at Headquarters

*/

6, 000

6,000

(iv) Short-term recruitment of approximately 750 General Service and related staff at Headquarters each year for conferences and other short-term service

*/

650

404

(v) Recruitment of approximately 40 support staff each year for United Nations information centres

*/

38

35

(vi) Placement of approximately 300 staff members each year

*/

286

325

(d) Staff Administration
(i) Application of United Nations Staff Regulations and Staff Rules and other administrative issuances to individual cases, ensuring consistent treatment of staff members

*/

 

z

(ii) Administration of staff in accordance with the United Nations Staff Regulations and Staff Rules:
a. Initial offers of appointment (approximately 2,500 per year) and issuance of approximately 9,000 extensions of appointment per year of staff at Headquarters and United Nations information centres :

-- Initial appointments of Professional and GS staff

-- Extensions of appointment (in collaboration with Executive Offices) of Professional and GS staff

*/

 

883

7,524

 

1,532

6,267

b. Review of contractual status of approximately 40 Professional staff on a Secretariat-wide basis for conversion to career appointment for National Competitive Examination candidates : Conversion to permanent:

-- Review for permanent:

-- Extension of probationary

-- Review for probationary

-- Extension of appointment

-- Five-year review:

*/

70

23

2

8

2

31

17

23

5

2

3

10

c. Counselling for career growth within the Secretariat

*/

 

aa

d. Counselling on personnel problems, compliance with the code of conduct for international civil servants and addressing indebtedness in consultation with the Staff Counsellor’s Office

*/

30-35

30-35

e. Application of approximately 9,000 individual cases per year of the Staff Regulations and Staff Rules

*/

3,059

2,695

f. Advice to management and staff on all aspects of human resources management policies and staff administration

*/

v

v

g. Participation in the activities of joint staff-management bodies on personnel policies and staff welfare, early identification of potential problems between management and staff and contributions to their resolution

*/

12

12 bb.

h. Service as ex officio member of the appointment and promotion bodies for appointment, placement, promotion, conversion to career appointment and termination for unsatisfactory service. (OSD participation with one ex officio representative in each of the following AP bodies) -- APB

APC

APP

Field Service Promotion Review Panel

*/

 

53

49

45

 

46

43

46

12

i. Participation in departmental placement and promotion panels, as required

*/

120

120 cc

j. Participation in Office of Human Resources Management and Secretariat working groups at Headquarters

*/

   
(iii) Monitoring of the administration of benefits and allowances of some 7,000 staff, in accordance with the Staff Regulations and Staff Rules, carried out under the authority to be delegated to executive offices

*/

 

ff

(iv) Contribution to the development and implementation of human resources management policies that will ensure a sound and coherent application of the United Nations rules and norms governing personnel management. These functions will be carried out in cooperation with other services within the Office of Human Resources Management and in the light of the experiences gained in the application of current personnel policies

*/

v

v

(v) Participation in the continuous review of the Staff Rules in order to ensure consistency with administrative issuances

*/

v

v

In the light of changes within the Secretariat, proposals for revisions to the Staff Rules with a view to standardizing approach and application, thus reducing the need to consider granting exceptions

*/

 

gg

(vi) Continuous review of staff entitlements, with a view to simplifying processing and ensuring consistent interpretation of the Staff Rules

*/

v

v

(vii) Decisions on approximately 120 exceptions relating to entitlements

*/

97

98

(viii) Career counselling to individual staff members, and intervention, when necessary, with the department to resolve issues at an early stage and avoid unnecessary appeals

*/

v

v

(ix) Induction of approximately 2,500 staff at the time of appointment to advise them of the Staff Regulations and Staff Rules and what is expected of them during their service with the Organization

*/

1,923

2,869

(x) Review of individual classification requests for posts in the Professional category and above and in the Field Service and General Service and related categories at Headquarters and other established duty stations (In collaboration with the classification section in SSD ) -- classifications for Professional staff

-- classifications for GS staff

*/

 

255

240

 

263

242

(e) Monitoring
(i) Monitoring of the implementation of the Staff Regulations and Staff Rules and personnel policies by departments and offices at Headquarters and offices away from Headquarters, as appropriate under the delegation of authority (Monitoring of personnel actions authorized by the Executive Offices)

*/

16,660

13,784

       
       
(ii) Continuous review of the mechanism for monitoring and human resources management auditing actions taken by departments and offices at Headquarters and offices away from Headquarters to which appropriate delegation of authority on personnel matters have been given, such as promotions, conversion of fixed-term appointments, special post allowances and entitlements

*/

N/A

 
(f) Separation
(i) Conduct of exit interviews with staff separating from service to determine reasons for separation and to record their experiences with a view to improving staff relationships and policies within the organization

*/

N/A

 
(ii) Briefing of retiring staff in coordination with the Staff Counsellor’s Office

*/

8

10

(g) Staffing Support
(i) Maintenance of rosters by occupational group (candidates for the roster).

*/

700

1,440

Review and evaluation of approximately 8,000 applications and correspondence

*/

8,000

11,000

Initial screening and interviews

*/

v

v

Reference checks and verification of degrees for rosters

*/

N/A

N/A

(ii) Issuance of consolidated vacancy notices to replenish occupational groups

*/

5

5

(iii) Individual searches for qualified candidates for key positions, with particular attention to women candidates as well as candidates from unrepresented and under-represented Member States

*/

20

10

(iv) Provision of rosters of qualified candidates for recruitment by departments in consultation with the clusters of the Operational Services Division

*/

175

117

(v) Strengthening the rosters, occupational and otherwise, of external candidates in cooperation with Member States and through networking with professional associations and other institutions

*/

v

v

(vi) Mailing of recruitment information to women’s organizations and professional associations (approximately 400 letters per year) to identify sources of qualified candidates, and updating of worldwide mailing lists (800 addresses)

*/

1,500

1,500

(vii) Communications with prospective candidates (approximately 18,500 letters and 12,000 telephone inquiries per year on Professional employment opportunities)

*/

33,000

49,000

Official correspondence with Member States on recruitment matters (approximately 500 letters and notes verbales per year)

*/

700

923

(viii) Special assignments and reports providing statistics and information on P-1/ P-2 and P-3 vacancy situations and projections for the Central Examinations Board and for the Central Recruitment Examinations Board

*/

N/A

50

(ix) Placement of regular advertisements and special advertisements for occupational groups of posts and priority vacancies

*/

v

v

(x) Announcement of available vacancies via electronic media (e.g., Internet and optical disk) and electronic receipt of applications

*/

700

637

(xi) Conduct of recruitment campaigns and missions as required to fill vacancies and feed the rosters

*/

v

v

Subprogramme 3.

Specialist services

1. Parliamentary services
(a) Parliamentary documentation:
Annual reports to the General Assembly on issues related to the United Nations common system, compensation, classification, staff development and training, performance appraisal and management and career development

* /

7

3

(b) Substantive services:

Servicing of the Fifth Committee of the General Assembly on matters related to the United Nations common system concerning conditions of service, salaries, pensions, allowances and other entitlements and classification, as well as staff development and training, performance appraisal and management and career development

*/

16

19

2. Published material:
Promulgation of salary scales, administrative and information issuances and updates to the Organization Manual**

*/

100

12

100

14

3. Administrative support services:
(a) Common System and Inter-Agency Policy Section
(i) Formulation within the Organization and coordination with other organizations of the common system of policies and procedures regarding salaries, pensions, allowances and other entitlements:

(a). Substantive participation in meetings of intergovernmental and inter-agency bodies, the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions, the International Civil Service Commission, the Advisory Committee on Post Adjustment Questions and the Consultative Committee on Administrative Questions as well as working groups of those bodies.

*/

9

11

b. Preparation of reports and working papers for sessions of the International Civil Service Commission, the Advisory Committee on Post Adjustment Questions and the Consultative Committee on Administrative Questions

*/

9

8

c. Approval and/or issuance of administrative instructions, information circulars and other instructions related to salaries, pensions, allowances and other entitlements

*/

12

14

d. Issuance and monitoring of the implementation of administrative instructions and guidelines, and deciding on exceptions thereto, relating to salaries, allowances and other entitlements

*/

995jj

1105jj

e. Monitoring of the implementation of decisions of the International Civil Service Commission on compensation issues such as the mobility/hardship scheme and assignment measures for staff in the Professional category and above, the Field Service category and internationally recruited staff in the General Service category

*/

9

10

(ii) Conduct of salary surveys at a number of duty stations, and review, approval and issuance of salary scales resulting from the analysis of data collected in the course of salary surveys conducted in over 180 duty stations

*/

25

21

(iii) Establishment, review and updating of allowances and other entitlements related to peacekeeping, and participation in technical survey missions

*/

11

9

(iv) Provision of information for statements of programme budget implications on draft resolutions or decisions concerning salaries, allowances and other entitlements

*/

3

2

(v) Assistance in staff-management consultations on issues of salaries, allowances and other entitlements and benefits

*/

4

4

(b) Compensation and Classification Policy Section
(i) Maintenance of electronic database (current and historical) of all General Service and National Officer salary scales (containing more than 1,500 scales), automated processing and transmission of salary survey data to other United Nations agencies and field duty stations, and implementation of emoluments packages for all categories of staff on a timely basis

*/

kk

kk

(ii) Organizational structure and job design:

a. Review of current classification standards for the Professional, Field Service and General Service and related categories, to participate in the development of classification standards, to evaluate existing classification structures and to pursue actively the integration of the classification system within the overall management process

*/

ll

ll

b. Provide assistance to the service clusters in the implementation of the classification standards developed for posts in the Professional category and above and the Field Service and General Service categories

*/

620

690

c. Review of appeals filed with respect to the classification of posts in the Professional category and above and the Field Service and General Service and related categories at Headquarters and other established duty stations Approx. 300 appeals

30

30

       
(iii) Studies and revisions to the Organization Manual:**      
(c ) Administrative Law Unit
(i) In the area of appeals: if cases are not resolved before they reach the appeal stage, replies on behalf of the Secretary-General will be filed in a timely fashion and information requested by the Joint Appeals Board will be researched and provided promptly in order to avoid costly procedural delays in the disposition of appeals. The Administrative Law Unit will represent the Secretary-General at oral hearings both at the preliminary stage and at the appeal stage

*/

105

115

In the area of disciplinary matters: special attention will be paid to the preliminary stage in order to gather the elements necessary to determine whether disciplinary charges should be brought against a staff member. As appropriate, the Unit will prepare charges and represent the Secretary-General at oral hearings

*/

69

82

(ii) Represent the Secretary-General before the Joint Appeals Board when it considers requests for suspension of action on a contested decision

*/

12

20

(iii) Pursue settlement in all appropriate cases

*/

7

4

(iv) Prepare written statements on behalf of the Secretary-General in appeals filed with the Joint Appeals Board, conduct research and gather additional information that may be requested by the Board in the consideration of particular cases and participate in hearings scheduled by the Board

*/

50

68

(v) Investigate all disciplinary matters referred to the Office of Human Resources Management to determine whether disciplinary charges should be brought

*/

69

82

Direct and monitor preliminary investigations conducted in the field to ensure respect of due process requirements

*/

23

25

When a staff member agrees to waive referral to a Joint Disciplinary Committee, recommend appropriate disciplinary measures and prepare the documents necessary to implement the decision

*/

1

0

When charges are brought before a Joint Disciplinary Committee at Headquarters, prepare written and oral presentation of the case to that Committee

*/

3

2

When allegations of serious misconduct are brought, prepare recommendations for summary dismissal

*/

9

7

(vi) Prepare a computerized compendium of relevant jurisprudence and interpretations  

mm

mm

(e) Examinations and Tests Section      
(i) Administration of national competitive examinations at the P-2 and P-3 levels in some 20 to 30 countries per year in 10 occupational categories.

*/

809

1453

(ii) Administration of competitive examinations for promotion from the General Service and related categories to the Professional category in six occupational categories per year

*/

303nn

207oo

(iii) Administration of examinations at the entrance P-2 and P-3 levels for posts requiring special language competence

*/

161

491

(iv) Administration of tests at Headquarters for recruitment of General Service staff (clerical, typing, stenography, statistical and accounting) for an estimated 3,500 candidates annually

*/

2 397

 
(v) Preparation and administration of structured interviews in conjunction with oral examinations and the screening of candidates

*/

97

231

(vi) Conduct of structured interviews for designated senior posts in the Professional category and above (initially 10 per year)

20

0pp

 
(vii) Administration of the internship programme for approximately 250 interns per year

250

422

418

 
 
(f) Staff Counsellor’s Office
(i) Coordination of counselling for personal, financial, family, immigration, insurance, educational and legal matters, work-related difficulties, permission to work, advice on visas, substance abuse assistance, etc. (4500 clients per year from the United Nations, UNICEF and UNDP)

6 052qq

5 715qq

(ii) Processing of Staff Benevolent Fund applications (about 400 annually)

800

1 032

964

Servicing of 80 meetings of the Staff Benevolent Fund Board

80

56

50

(iii) Organization of regular pre-retirement programmes (for 350 participants annually)

700

350

350

Preparation and distribution of pre-retirement booklets (900 copies annually) Secretariat-wide

1800

900

1 200

(iv) Provision of counselling on education, summer camps and related financial assistance (about 350 consultations annually)

700

234

244

(v) Conduct of induction briefings for new staff (about 15 briefings annually)

30

5

3

(vi) Processing of requests for United Nations endorsement of visa applications by the Visa Committee (approximately 400 requests annually from the United Nations, UNDP and UNICEF)

800

1 283

681

Provision of secretariat services for the Visa Committee (approximately 10 meetings annually)

20

12

6

(g) Contribute to the review and development of policies and procedures related to staff welfare and mental health

*/

8

9

Subprogramme 4.

Training and staff development programmes

1. Management development
(a) Institutionalize the People Management Training Programme, which provides basic management training for all senior and middle-level managers, and implement, on an ongoing basis, management training for all staff as they enter middle-level and senior management positions

*/

208

132

(b) Provide follow-up programmes at all levels to reinforce people management concepts, as well as to engage managers across levels in common efforts to evolve the Organization’s management culture

*/

185

481

(c ) To develop and implement programmes in General Service effectiveness to complement the People Management Training Programme

*/

322

1 701

(d) To further develop materials on gender and cultural diversity to integrate into staff development programmes at all levels

*/

227

791

(e) To extend the collaborative negotiation skills programme to supervisory and managerial staff at offices away from Headquarters

*/

487

520

(f) To provide training in supervisory skills to staff at all duty stations in the Junior Professional and senior General Service categories with supervisory responsibilities

*/

231

355

(g) To provide departments and offices with programmes to support programme management in such areas as team building, work planning and appraisal

*/

rr

rr

(h) To provide support to departments and offices in developing core competencies to be linked with other human resources management systems, including recruitment, career support, staff appraisal and staff development  

0

372

2. Information technology
(a) Providing targeted end-user training that will increase access and use of Organization-wide applications, for example, word processing, cc: Mail, Internet and centralized databases

*/

4 641

3 181

(b) Providing skills and knowledge for the transition to new software standards

*/

1 407

6 945

(c ) Providing departmental computer support staff with knowledge and skills in the design, development and implementation of network applications for decentralized work flows

*/

718

911

(d) Providing training for managers in the management of computer resources for improving work flows

*/

ss

 
(e) Maintaining and upgrading resources for supporting more widespread and timely delivery of training, that is, video-conferencing, training over the Internet and local area networks, self-study centres and multimedia software

*/

2000+

3000+

3. United Nations administration, including peacekeeping administration
(a) The goal of the training programme in United Nations administration is to increase competence in all areas of administration, particularly in human and financial resources management for both regular and field operations, and to support increasing decentralization and delegation of authority. A four-module programme in this area, developed and piloted in 1996-1997, covers personnel, procurement, budget and finance, and support services, respectively. With increasing decentralization and delegation of authority, necessary modifications will be made to the programme on a continuing basis

*/

234

810

(b) Other activities relate to the creation of a cadre of qualified staff to serve in administrative positions at all levels in the field. The Training Programme in Peacekeeping Operation Administration responds to the demand for well-trained middle level administrators, while a new Programme for Senior Administrators in Field Operations will develop middle- and senior- level staff who show potential as future Chief Administrative Officers and other senior administrators for field operations. These activities include a field-based component to give participants on-the-job experience at a mission site and are continually modified to respond to changing circumstances

*/

25tt

0

4. Substantive skills development and career support
(a) The Secretariat-wide substantive skills development programme offers opportunities to staff to upgrade and update substantive skills in their current areas of work. It provides managers with a tool for ensuring that the specialized competence needed for carrying out the substantive work of their departments and for maintaining the flexibility to respond to changes in mandates, new responsibilities and developments in areas of specialization are developed and maintained. At the same time it provides staff with opportunities for professional growth. The programme operates in a decentralized manner through annual training plans formulated by departments on the basis of their priority needs and incorporating individual training requirements identified during performance management discussions. Plans are reviewed to ensure the most cost-effective allocation of funds

*/

2 602

2 379

(b) The sabbatical studies programme provides a small number of staff each year with the opportunity to carry out research at academic institutions for up to four months in areas that benefit the staff member and the Organization. The period of study has been reduced in order to provide opportunities for more staff to participate

*/

11uu

7uu

(c) Further initiatives to be undertaken to strengthen the Organization’s career support efforts in 1998-1999 will include:

(i)Developing enhanced orientation programmes for all entry-level staff to build a basic foundation of the knowledge, skills and global service perspective required for a career in the international civil service

*/

95

79

(ii)Workshops to enhance the ability of supervisors and managers to support the career developments of their staff and to develop the ability of staff members to manage their own careers

*/

818

1 106

5. Language and communications
(a) In accordance with General Assembly resolutions 2480 B (XXIII) of 21 December 1968, 43/D of 21 December 1988 and 50/11 of 2 November 1995, the Organization provides language training in the six official languages. Language programmes are continually being adapted to meet organizational requirements and emphasis is placed on conversation and other special language courses to maintain linguistic skills and develop staff members’ abilities to use the languages for job-related purposes

*/

3 914

4 164

(b) Communications skills development is essential for improved performance and is a key to the effective functioning of the new Performance Appraisal System. Training will be provided in such oral communications skills as listening, group feedback and negotiation. Drafting skills training courses are offered in the working languages to ensure a consistent drafting standard for all reports and correspondence. Presentation skills courses assist staff members in making public presentations with appropriate use of visual aids, including video and multimedia

*/

452

306

(c ) A self-study centre at Headquarters, which was created through the conversion of the existing language laboratory, provides staff with the opportunity to develop their linguistic skills in their own time through use of audio, video and multimedia

*/

1 811

1 533

6. General Service and related categories training
Staff in the General Service and related categories are eligible to participate in most of the centrally organized training activities, including orientation programmes, language and communications courses, information technology training, mission readiness, and administration, as well as programmes to upgrade substantive skills and, if qualified, in the sabbatical programme. Special programmes directed specifically to staff in these categories to enable them to acquire or improve technical and managerial skills include programmes in supervisory skills, General Service effectiveness and collaborative negotiation skills

*/

vv

vv

7. Management and advisory role of the Training and Staff Development Service      
In order to provide guidance in all aspects of planning, administration and delivery of training and staff development programmes, and taking into account the current trends towards decentralization and delegation of authority, the role of the Service has expanded to include providing advisory and technical support related to staff training and development to departments and offices at all other duty stations, assessing training needs, supporting and monitoring the quality and equalization of training opportunities throughout the Secretariat and establishing training policies

*/

ww

 
Subprogramme 5. Medical services:
Administrative support services
Medical services:
(a) Medical standards and policies will continue to be reviewed and used as guidelines for the medical services of the entire United Nations system, as well as for military medical units of peacekeeping operations and of troop-contributing countries.

*/

xx

yy

Medical care will continue to be provided at the medical services at the United Nations, UNDP and UNICEF, and equipment will be upgraded to keep abreast of changing medical technology.

*/

zz

zz

Technical support will be provided to 50 United Nations field dispensaries, all clinics of the regional commissions and military medical units at the peacekeeping missions to ensure adequate care to all United Nations personnel, dependants, military observers, civilian police, and United Nations troops. Medical clearances for recruitment and reassignment will continue to be provided to reduce potential problems of medical evacuation, compensation claims and disability benefits

*/

aaa

aaa

(b) Staff health promotion programmes will be accomplished through health-enhancing programmes (ergonomics, smoking cessation, weight reduction, vision screening, pulmonary function tests, diabetes control), health education programmes (e.g., AIDS awareness) pre-mission medical briefings, updating of immunization, and screening for specific medical conditions and health risks.

*/

bbb

ccc

Occupational health risks and injuries will be minimized by advising staff and administration on ergonomics, investigating environmental complaints and following up on planned environmental surveys. Training of staff of the Division through external studies will continue, as funding permits

*/

ddd

eee

Other efficiency measures include partial decentralization of sick leave certification to executive officers and abolition of redundant mandatory medical clearances

*/

fff

fff

(c) The Medical Services Division intends to further develop the LAN-based electronic medical records system for United Nations staff and a database of sick leave records.

*/

ggg

ggg

In order to improve the level of communication with staff and personnel at different duty stations, e-mail is being used, and to efficiently obtain the most recent information on medical and health issues, a field information travel network has been created within the World Wide Web on the Internet

*/

ggg

ggg

Services/Activities of the Medical Services Division
(a) Clinical services (for New York-based staff of the United Nations, UNDP, UNICEF and other agencies):

*/

   
(i) Full medical examinations

*/

3 020

3 541

(ii) Medical consultations by physicians, nurses and medical consultants

*/

48 046

44 704

(iii) Immunizations, injections and electrocardiograms

*/

6 120

6 503

(iv) Laboratory investigations, including lung function tests and pap smears

*/

hhh

iii

(v) Radiological investigations and review of X-ray films of field exams

*/

9 145

9 827

(vi) Health promotion activities: ergonomics, work environment surveillance, vision screening, diabetes control and weight-reduction programmes

*/

jjj

kkk

(b) Medico-administrative services (for worldwide staff of the United Nations, including peacekeeping operations, UNDP/UNFPA and UNICEF)

*/

   
(i) Review and classification of medical examination reports from examining physicians worldwide

*/

13 049

10 548

(ii) Providing medical clearance for recruitment, reassignment, peacekeeping assignment and mission travel

*/

25 110

31 519

(iii)Approval of medical evacuation of overseas staff and follow-up with hospitals and treating physicians, determination of the period for daily subsistence allowance payment and period of hospitalization (for field staff only)

*/

1 039

1 425

(iv) Certification of sick leave cases beyond decentralized authority

*/

11 181

19 425

(v) Determination of system-wide disability benefit from the United Nations Joint Staff Pension Fund

*/

898

722

(vi) Review and advice on system-wide medical compensation cases from the Advisory Board on Compensation Claims and verification of related bills

*/

706

531

(vii) Review and advice on special dependency benefit and special education grant

*/

393

280

(c ) Field- related services (collectively for all field staff)      
(i) Establishment, assessment and ongoing technical support to over 50 United Nations dispensaries, including the appointment of dispensary physicians, nurses and laboratory technicians and the procurement of additional medical and laboratory supplies and equipment

*/

50

50

(ii) On-site assessment of local medical facilities in field duty stations and submission of recommendations

*/

10

5

(iii) Determination of health rating of duty stations worldwide, in conjunction with International Civil Service Commission classifications

*/

350

350

(iv) Appointment and review of United Nations examining physicians worldwide

*/

750

750

Section 27C. Office of Human Resources Management – qualitative assessment of programme perfomance

Subprogramme 1. Human resources planning and management of information service
Objectives To provide integrated global analyses, forecasts and projections; to complete a global system on human resources for monitoring purposes and for reporting to legislative bodies.
Assessment criteria

Timely, comprehensive and consistent analyses, forecasts and projections.

Major benefits realized

Longer-term maintenance and support for information systems was made a priority. Emphasis was placed on the needs of offices away from Headquarters in order to achieve the comparability of data worldwide. Consistent efforts were made to improve analysis and forecasting in the planning function, for example concerning trend analysis in the composition of the Secretariat.

Subprogramme 2. Operational services
Objectives To provide integrated support to planning, information management, staffing and staff administration; to pursue the reform initiatives by promoting organizational change, including through delegation of authority; to advance the automation, streamlining and simplification of administrative processes as part of the IMIS rollout procedures; and to integrate further recruitment, promotion and placement activities and to make them more efficient and cost-effective.
Assessment criteria

The number of staff and other clients served, timeliness of delivery of outputs, their cost-effectiveness, impact of guidelines and other assistance and advice.

Major benefits realized

The framework for and processes of a new system of recruitment, promotion and placement were finalized and submitted for review. A detailed monitoring and reporting capacity was created to track the progress in delegation of authority. In conjunction with IMIS Release 3, major entitlements processing packages were automated, with extensive testing and training programmes preceding implementation. The first stage of the staff skills inventory has been completed, covering over 40 per cent of the global Secretariat: at the same time initial succession plans have been developed as part of the Action Plans in Human Resources Management agreed by each programme manager with the ASG/OHRM. The Action Plans themselves provide a planning and management framework for each department and office to anticipate their needs and responsibilities with regard to staffing, including gender and geographical representation, mobility, early notification of vacancies, training and career development. In the cluster teams for staff administration, basic services for recruitment, placement and promotion of staff have been integrated with administration of benefits and entitlements. The consistency of application of the Staff Regulations and Staff Rules, as well as administrative instructions and guidelines has been monitored.

Subprogramme 3. Specialist services
Objectives To provide specialized advisory services concerning conditions of service of the United Nations staff worldwide; to attract highly qualified candidates to the Organization by streamlining and strengthening competitive entry processes; to foster the creation of organizational culture that promotes high performance, continuous learning and managerial excellence through the provision of Secretariat-wide staff development programmes, career support mechanisms, effective performance management systems and counselling services; to contribute to the development of competitive conditions of service; and to promote equity in the workplace through improved handling of disputes and disciplinary cases.
Assessment criteria

Numbers of staff served, timeliness of delivery of programmes and outputs, cost-effectiveness, level of client satisfaction, provision of legally sound and administratively enforceable advice, and extent to which services meet stated objectives.

Major benefits realized

Organizational core and managerial competencies were identified through a Secretariat-wide participatory process. These are being applied to other human resources systems such as recruitment, development and appraisal and are helping to promote a shared language and common standards of performance in the Organization. All staff development and learning programmes have been reviewed; new programmes introduced and others enhanced. Extensive advice on decentralized training resulted in significant improvements in departmental planning and reporting on expenditures and impact.. The Intranet website on staff development activities has been established. Almost all departments have commenced implementation of the PAS, and expanded career support programmes have been provided. National competitive examinations were held in 41 countries, enhancing the recruitment of staff from un- and under-represented countries; increased emphasis was placed on the involvement of departments in all phases of the process to facilitate placement of successful candidates; several new specialized exams with short time lines were developed; and increasing use was made of videoconferencing to interview candidates. Extensive advice was provided to staff and organizations of the common system on common system issues and compensation and classification policy. 46 salary surveys were conducted. During the biennium, 220 requests for administrative review, 118 appeals cases and 151 disciplinary cases were handled. Procedures were developed for the implementation of a pilot project on appeals to delegate responsibility to managers to defend decisions.

 

 

Subprogramme 4. Training and staff development programmes
Objectives To promote organizational culture change and assist in building present and future human resources capacity by identifying needs and developing targeted training programmes to build essential skills and competencies.
Assessment criteria

Number of staff trained, quality/relevance of programmes delivered, extent to which training programmes meet stated objectives, application of skills on the job, changes made in response to training/development undertaken.

Major benefits realized

There were over 40,000 participants in staff development programmes, including some 5,000 participants in supervisory and managerial development training which focused on planning, delegating, problem-solving, communication and conflict resolution. Training also aimed at building skills in setting performance standards, managing performance, managing change, and improving teamwork and accountability. Information technology training facilitated transition to new software standards, and assisted in mastering specialized and advanced skills (some 17,000 participants). Staff were given the opportunity to upgrade and update specific substantive or technical skills identified by departments/offices as necessary to carry out new and evolving mandates (some 5,000 staff). Multilingualism and respect for diversity were promoted through language training programmes in the six official languages (some 9,000 participants) and in programmes on gender issues in the workplace (1,000 participants). Programmes in United Nations Administration provided staff with knowledge and skills in budget, finance and procurement to promote more consistent standards across the organization and support staff in managing resources in a more decentralized environment with increased delegation of responsibility (some 1,000 participants).

Subprogramme 5. Medical services
Objectives To provide medical care and assure worldwide staff access to adequate medical care in the most cost-effective manner; to promote staff health and well-being and to minimize occupational health risks and injuries; to ensure that UN staff, including peacekeeping operations, funds and programmes meet the UN medical standards of recruitment/reassignment; and to assure staff access to benefit programmes in accordance with UN Staff Rules and established policy directives, and to protect those programmes at the same time.
Assessment criteria

Client satisfaction with the quality and timeliness of services; number of staff served; number of health promotion programmes and users; timely review of policy guidelines; standardization of criteria for medical classification, guidelines and medical examination forms; timely delivery of advice/decision to the Administration; client satisfaction with information and advice provided; and prompt and uniform response to medico-administrative matters.

Major benefits realized

For staff at Headquarters, there were over 6,500 full medical examinations; 92,750 consultations by physicians, nurses and medical consultants; over 12,600 immunizations and EKGs. For staff in field offices, over 2,400 medical evacuation cases were approved; medical facilities in 15 hardship duty stations were assessed; technical support was provided to 45 UN dispensaries; and the Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) kits were introduced. Regarding staff health promotion, the following additional programmes were established: (i) breast cancer support group; (ii) expanded the diabetes support group; (iii) extended annual Health Fair from 1 to 2 days; and (iv) initiated liaison with NYU Medical Center and Memorial Sloan Kettering Center to introduce early detection of breast and colon cancer and management of risk factors for coronary heart disease, and to facilitate staff access to these centers. Provided about 19,000 medical clearances for peacekeeping mission assignments: reviewed over 1,200 medical compensation cases; and recommendations were made regarding 1,620 pension disability cases. Medical standards of recruitment were reviewed; ST/AIs on family leave, sick leave and maternity leave, on medical standards and clearances and ST/IC on ergonomic workstations were issued.

Legislative review

The Fifth Committee and ACABQ reviewed all aspects of both the human resources management reform programme and the administration of staff on its biennial cycle (General Assembly resolutions 53/209, 53/212, 53/214, 53/221, 53/238, 53/239 and 53/240).

External review and evaluation

External audits covered the use of consultants, employment of retirees and gratis personnel, examinations and tests, the Sabbatical Leave Programme, training, identification, remuneration and evaluation of consultants, and institutional contracts. OIOS conducted management reviews of the use of retirees, consultants and the attendance and leave system. Measures have been taken to implement relevant recommendations, including the issuance of instructions on the use of retirees and consultants, review of eligibility requirements of applicants to examinations and new instruction on the Sabbatical Leave Programme. Guidelines were prepared for administration of recruitment, promotion and placement procedures.

Internal evaluation

and lessons learned

Several task teams undertook the review of specific issues (recruitment, placement and promotion, streamlining the rules/administrative issuances, consistency in administration of entitlements and benefits, attendance management). The participants of the task teams were assigned fully to the task before them. This initiative has proven to be far more effective in producing workable and concrete solutions to problems. In the area of medical services, the focus was on updating and simplifying relevant guidelines, discontinuing redundant procedures and enhancing health promotion programmes.

Impact of reform and restructuring

The work of the Office has been reorganized and new priorities set emphasizing support to managers in an increasingly decentralized environment with expanded delegation of authority.. The focus was on human resources policy development, simplification, streamlining, automation and monitoring of delegated functions, in addition to the development of new recruitment and planning modules.

Section 27D:

Support Services

Output/service by subprogramme Programmed

Number provided

 

1998-1999

1998

1999

Subprogramme 1. Security and safety
1. Security services
(a) Services related to office and conference facilities:  
Screening of persons, vehicles and packages entering and leaving the premises

*

1 137 792

1 217 930

Screening for concealed weapons with metal detectors

*/

11 876

8 945

Coverage at meetings, receptions and special events

*/

1 731

1 746

Conducting security training programmes

*/

1 047

1 319

544a

1 527b

Raising and lowering flags of States Members of the United Nations

*/

256

253

Operation and maintenance of the electronic surveillance and closed-circuit television security systems at Headquarters and at the residence of the Secretary-General

*/

365

365

(b) Services related to garage facilities:  
Screening of persons in vehicles entering the United Nations complex, including delivery vehicles

*/

c

c

Thorough spot-checking of diplomatic and staff members’ vehicles entering the garage

*/

 

c

Selling parking tickets, inspecting garage permits and recording overnight parking of delegation vehicles for payment purposes

*/

365

365

(c ) Special services:
Provision of protection detail for the Secretary-General and other dignitaries

*/

493

531

Conducting investigations relating to security matters

*/

497

572

Liaising with host country law enforcement agencies

*/

12

12

Provision of back-up protection escorts for the Secretary-General

*/

365

365

(d) Pass and identification services:

*/

101 276

115 789

Issuance of identification cards and passes

*/

87 098

94 402

Maintenance of related records

*/

256

253

Operation and maintenance of the photo and identification badge system and confiscation of outdated grounds passes

*/

2 063

1 719

(e) Locksmith Services:
Provision and maintenance of all locking systems, including safes, for the entire Headquarters complex

*/

15 898

7 583

2. Safety services:  
(a) Inspection of Headquarters premises, including lifts, escalators and machinery rooms, for safety and fire hazards

*/

12

228

12d

214e

Conducting safety training programmes for security officers, fire officials, industrial shop workers and guides

*/

22

24

Coordination of fire drills and safety engineering surveys

*/

225

158

Review of construction and alteration plans to ensure that safety and fire requirements are met

*/

147

103

Drafting safety reports and recommendations

*/

65

39

Monitoring and inspection of fire and water alarms, practice evacuation of United Nations premises

*/

365

365

Issuance of safety equipment to staff and contractual workers

*/

830

 
Health inspection of kitchen facilities

*/

6

0

Annual safety, sanitation/hygiene inspection of all food preparation, storage and serving areas

*/

6

0

(b) Inspection of areas during bomb threats

*/

8

5

Responding to all types of alarms and emergencies, such as fire suppression, opening stuck lift doors and undertaking first aid

*/

1 603

1 852

Conducting fire watches during welding operations

*/

30

12

Investigation of motor vehicle accidents, compensation cases, accidents involving visitors and staff members, illnesses involving visitors and damage to personal and United Nations property

*/

142

178

Subprogramme 2.

Information technology services:

1. Technological innovations
In the area of support for computer and network infrastructure
(a) Replacing small network servers by larger ones that will deliver standard computer applications to all users connected to the network

*/

37

30

(b) Continuing with the standardization of all personal computers using CMS and migrating to the Windows 95 operating system

*/

3 852

1 490

(c ) Providing assistance to substantive programmes in replacing technologically obsolete databases, so that access can be provided to a large number of users, including services to Member States

*/

   
2. Telecommunications
(a) Strengthening of the current physical data network to give proper support to the increasing use of network intensive computer applications such as the Internet, e-mail and IMIS

*/

130

130

(b) Upgrading the existing telephone system to ensure continued reliable voice and fax support for the Headquarters complex

*/

   
(c ) Enhancing the infrastructure for messaging and electronic mail and a phased replacement of cable and telex transmissions with e-mail and fax

*/

   
(d) Increasing support for data communications for the Organization for applications such as IMIS, the optical disk and the Internet, which depend on high-speed digital links

*/

 

o

(e) Establishing an Organization-wide video-conferencing network, which can be used, on demand by departments, permanent missions and other users in connection with United Nations programmes

*/

200

552

Subprogramme 3.

Integrated Management Information System

1. Management
Coordination of all of IMIS activities, liaison with user areas, including offices away from Headquarters to define priorities for system modification and expansions, ensuring timely delivery of the required software changes in accordance with priorities established by the IMIS Steering Committee.

*/

 

p

Administrative support, including budgetary control, liaison and coordination with other organizations of the United Nations system using IMIS in order to achieve economies through coordinated application of common interest

*/

   
2. Business analysis and programming  
(a) Enhancements and problem management
(i) Analysis of requests for system changes with a view to determining the most efficient technical solutions taking into account impact on the users and workflow-streamlining objectives

*/

p

p

(ii) Analysis of system changes to determine development costs, assignment of resources and implementation planning

*/

p

p

(iii) Monitoring of system performance to determine priority areas that may require tuning or design improvements

*/

q

q

(v) Construction of the changes to the system as approved in the workplan and coordination of testing and updating of procedural documentation as well as coordination of training of users whenever applicable

*/

p

p

(b) Substantive area support:
(i) Monitoring of the quality of data in the system worldwide, ensuring consistency, analysing issues and identifying solutions

*/

q

 
(ii) Assistance to user areas and offices away from Headquarters for resolution of data problems or identification of possible enhancements to the system to resolve local issues

*/

   
(iii) Consolidation of work programmes taking into account United Nations and other organizations’ requirements to ensure optimal utilization of resources, avoiding conflicts in the database and ensuring consistency in approach

*/

 

v

(iv) Production of ad hoc reports based on the internal audit log and analysis of information on administrative activities to determine, on the basis of frequency of types of transaction, areas that may benefit from a functional review on the part of users

*/

 

w

3. Technical support
(a) Maintenance of the development environment:

*/

 

x

(i) Establishment of standards for and support of developers in the areas of the UNIX operating system, database management system and the application development tools

*/

q

q

(ii) Management of the development environment by ensuring a close control over the versions of the system, various databases (development, testing, diagnostic, disaster recovery, etc.), strict configuration management, back-up and other physical security measures to ensure proper functioning of the development hardware and software

*/

 

y

(b) Research and testing of new tools and technical support
(i) Close monitoring of the development of new software and hardware tools, including upgrades to the tools used by the IMIS system to identify those likely to improve performance and add capabilities to the system

*/

q

 
(ii) Coordination of installation and testing of new tools towards the selection of the most appropriate for the system

*/

   
(iii) Provision of technical support to the development and operational units at other duty stations, as well as analyses of existing tools, in cooperation with the technical unit in charge of operations at headquarters, towards better utilization

*/

q

q

(c ) Technical support for operations
(i) Coordination of the quality assurance process for upgrades and fixes to the system before the new version is delivered for production

*/

   
(ii) Coordination of the distribution of the new software upgrades and fixes to the other duty stations and to other user organizations

*/

q

q

(iii) Coordination and monitoring of compliance with established procedures in the areas of maintenance of system and reference tables for which the entire system is dependent

*/

q

q

(d) Maintenance of the central reporting system
(i) Coordination with user areas for definition of requirements in terms of data needed for reporting purposes, design of the necessary reporting tools and distribution of the new or improved facilities worldwide

--New reports

--Redesigned reports

*/

 

51

50

 
(ii) Support of the users both at Headquarters and offices away from Headquarters for usage of the reporting system

*/

q

q

(iii) Coordination of reports development with other duty stations and the other organizations in order to avoid duplication of effort and to ensure sharing of reports developed

*/

 

ee

Subprogramme 4.

Procurement and transportation

1. Procurement services
Negotiation, preparation, execution and administration of contracts for the procurement of supplies, equipment, contractual services (including sea and air movements of goods and troops), external printing and binding services, presentation of cases to the Headquarters Committee on Contracts (HCC):

--Contracts

--Purchase orders

--Cases presented to HCC

*/

226

3 410

330

243

3 646gg

317

2. Support services
Raises and tracks case files and related documentation

*/

3 195

3 408ii

3. Transportation services
(a) Travel operations
Processing of laissez-passer and visa applications, customs clearances and travel transactions for staff members of the United Nations and specialized agencies and delegates attending sessions of the General Assembly

*/

45 623

46 356

(b) Traffic operations
Arrangement of incoming and outgoing shipments of household goods and personal effects for offices at Headquarters and overseas and for staff members of the United Nations and specialized agencies

*/

1 438

1 304

Custom clearances

*/

207

249

Filing and settlement of insurance claims

*/

808

678

Provision of stores and control services for expendable supplies for Headquarters and overseas offices

*/

28 970

24 502

Preparation of receiving and inspection reports

*/

5 576

6 998

Management and operation of official vehicles at Headquarters

*/

36

39

Provision of local transportation of mail and pouch items between the various locations of the Secretariat and other United Nations bodies in New York City

*/

28 646

28 260

Subprogramme 5.

Buildings management

(a) Facilities management and maintenance
Work orders completed

*/

18 470

19 724

Alteration and improvement projects

*/

7

6

Major maintenance projects supervised

*/

27

39

Electrical construction projects

*/

48

39

(b) Mail operations  
Incoming and outgoing pouch bags

*/

87 001

82 425

Pieces of incoming mail sorted

*/

6 483 265

6 567 075f

Pieces of outgoing postal mail dispatched

*/

974 162

816 224

Subprogramme 6.

Archives and records management

 
1. Records management and information resource management  
(i)Consulting and Training/Records Systems Analysis:
Briefings and demonstrations

*/

45

27

Needs assessment

*/

7

1

Records systems analysis

*/

0

2

Office-wide records systems analysis

*/

5

1

On-site systems implementation services

*/

155

9

(ii) Provision of technical services
Service request, internal

*/

983

1 118

Service request, external

*/

127

99

(iii) Policy and procurement research in records systems
Policy drafts

*/

1

0

Evaluations

*/

1

1

2. Archival processing and preservation and reference services  
Transferring inactive records from originating offices

*/

8 400

2 400

Appraising records for archival value and disposing of paper-based and electronic records no longer required

*/

4 190

3 020

Arranging and describing archival records according to international descriptive standards

*/

1 470

 
Providing reference services to Secretariat users and external researchers, including information retrieval, file loans and records reproduction

-- Reference service requests

-- Reproductions furnished

*/

3 370

7 500

Section 27D. Support services – qualitative assessment of programme performance

Subprogramme 1. Security and safety
Objectives To protect persons and property and to ensure safe and secure environment at United Nations Headquarters; to develop a unified command concept with other major duty stations; to provide training to security officers at these locations as well as to security staff assigned to field missions.
Assessment criteria

Effective security measures are in effect at all times throughout United Nations premises. A unified, cohesive, Organization-wide command structure. An adequate cadre of highly trained officers who are versatile in security operations. Improved fire and safety response mechanisms.

Major benefits realized

Ensured a safe and secure environment for the Organization, focusing on the security and safety of visiting dignitaries, delegates, staff and visitors, as well United Nations property within the Headquarters complex. The Security and Safety Service is regarded among its peers as a modern, fully trained security outfit, noted for its responsive management style, innovative initiatives and customer service approach.

Subprogramme 2. Information technology services
Objectives To upgrade and modernize the infrastructure at Headquarters to ensure cost-effective access and dissemination of information; to provide technical support services and monitor compliance with established standards; to provide guidance Secretariat-wide on best practices in applications development, data security, electronic document management and workflow systems.
Assessment criteria

Level of achievement of the objectives. Positive feedback from clients.

Major benefits realized

A modern and reliable infrastructure has been established that guarantees high availability of the overall LAN and WAN infrastructure, the migration to a modern e-mail system, consistent desktop and office automation tools throughout the campus. The consolidation of the LAN servers, the upgrade of more than 130 LAN closets and the full implementation of CMS, accompanied by the service level agreements have reduced the outages and ensured a consistent software basis. The Wide area network was upgraded at all major duty stations through the installation of new routers as a first step to implement more current technology. The Headquarters’ earth stations were also upgraded to meet the increased demands of peacekeeping operations and increased traffic. The private branch exchange was also upgraded pending its replacement to meet increased demand.

Subprogramme 3. Integrated Management Information System
Objectives To develop software to improve the system and maintain it current, coordinate among major users for choosing the best strategies for development and integration of new applications, define system modification and expansion priorities and coordinate technical support at Headquarters and offices away from Headquarters.
Assessment criteria

Level of achievement of the objectives. Positive feedback from clients.

Major benefits realized

While delays were incurred, the system continued to be improved, new releases were issued and successfully implemented, reports were increased and improved. Practically, by far the largest percentage of administrative transactions is now performed at Headquarters through IMIS. With the incremental implementation at offices away from Headquarters, the same takes place at these offices. The implementation of IMIS entails automatically total changes in the way the administrative work is performed. IMIS contributes to the reform process.

Subprogramme 4. Procurement and transportation
Objectives To restructure the procurement function to make it more responsive, expeditious and cost-effective and to ensure competitive, fair and transparent process. To provide effective and cost-efficient travel and transportation services by adjusting to changing market conditions and maximizing the UN purchasing power through the expansion of the common services approach between all New York-based funds and programmes.
Assessment criteria Various workload statistical data have been used to assess performance, in addition to timeliness, accuracy and client satisfaction regarding services delivered.
Major benefits realized The Procurement Division enhanced its Internet homepage to include registration programme and request for expression of interest, as well as information on current tenders and recent awards. Along with enhancing the transparency of procurement, efforts were made to improve business opportunities for suppliers in developing countries and countries with economies in transition by developing video and CD-ROM materials to introduce procurement activities and vendor registration procedures. In travel and transportation, the emphasis was on its common service aspect, which resulted in tangible savings through drawing a common contract for office supplies for the New York-based UN entities. United Nations travel standards were monitored; cost-efficient and timely delivery of goods and services was achieved Availability of discounted airfares to the United nations was increased through expanding relevant agreements with the airlines.
 

 

 

Subprogramme 5. Buildings management
Objectives To provide effective and efficient planning, management, maintenance and operation for all existing physical facilities and assets of the Headquarters; to undertake necessary space management, building renovation or alteration work. To support technically conference services and other activities of the Organization. To provide mail, diplomatic pouch, documents and information transmittal services; and to upholde the aesthetic, structural and environmental integrity of the buildings.
Assessment criteria

Timely, efficient and reliable provision of all services. Cost-effective delivery of services consistent with industry standards and benchmarking. Improved customer service and response time. Compliance with existing health, safety and building code regulations. Projects are successfully completed on time, within budget and with high quality.

Major benefits realized Proper and effective maintenance of the buildings and its systems as well as efficient and reliable services impacted positively the working environment of the staff and delegates. Safe, clean and comfortable surroundings enhanced the appearance of the facilities to the visitors and users of the buildings. Efficiencies in management of the utilities, space and rental costs, and in-house and contracted services saved resources that were used to promote other essential services for the Organization.
Subprogramme 6. Archives and records management
Objectives To preserve and service records with continuing value and to provide guidance to Secretariat offices on managing paper-based and electronic records. To develop more efficient transfer and retention scheduling procedures and to pursue aggressive appraisal and disposal of ephemeral records.
Assessment criteria Accuracy of the databases and establishment of intellectual control over information and records. Improvement in space efficiency. Improved protection and accessibility of records and archives. Timeliness of and user satisfaction with reference and record-keeping advisory services.
Major benefits realized Wider awareness of and stronger commitment to efficient record-keeping throughout the Secretariat. Identification of core holdings and acquisition of archivally acceptable venues to replace current archives and records management service sites and to service, in the future, as the basis for a possible Common Services Centre. Identification of non-core holdings subject to lower-cost commercial storage. Provision of expertise to the International Criminal Tribunals for Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia. Increased cooperation with other agencies.
Legislative review The progress in information technology and telecommunications, as well as the implementation of IMDIS were subject to detailed review by the General Assembly. While certain delays and cost overruns were criticized, it was recognized that considerable advances were made. Procurement reform and reorganization were continuously reviewed and its achievements were positively assessed by the General Assembly.
External review and evaluation All support services are subject to continuous and sometimes concurrent reviews by all oversight bodies focusing on variety of specific issues as well as on internal controls in general and on the efficiency of operations. The recommendations of such reviews are generally accepted and implemented.
Internal evaluation

and lessons learned

The common services continuously monitor their performance through workload statistics, customer satisfaction surveys and expert assessments by outside consultants. Some evaluations are aimed at benchmarking performance with similar services in the private and public sectors.

Impact of reform and restructuring

The reform and reorganization enhanced managerial flexibility, catalyzed synergies of common services, and encouraged staff to assume additional challenges and responsibilities. The management culture was evolving towards more, transparent, efficient and team-building operational modalities.

Section 27F:

Administration, Geneva

Output/service by subprogramme Programmed

Number provided

 

1998-1999

1998

1999

Subprogramme 1. Financial and electronic resources management service
1. Programme Planning and Budget Section      
(a) Allotments issued:

1 595

568

337

(b) Conference costings

556

174

152

2. Finance Section      
(a) Financial statement prepared

2 136

1 066

1 070

(b) Bank accounts reconciled

83

50

50

(c) Number of accounts maintained

23 000

30 760

30 800

(d) Obligations processed

95 302

42 419

41 212

(e) Claims and travel payments

18 355

9 475

11 696

(f) Education grant payments

6 322

3 501

1 703

(g) Other payments

25 000

20 054

8 624

(h) Journal vouchers

1 664

975

574

(i) Consultancy payments

5 909

1 494

1 739

3. Treasury      
(a) Investment vouchers

1 388

1 449

106

(b) Cheques issues

2 979

3 758

5 274

(c) Payment requests

42 304

14 913

18 931

(d) Receipts issued

12 269

6 647

2 776

4. Medical Insurance Unit      
Medical insurance claims requested

69 650

36 680

34 100

Electronic Services Section --1. Telecommunications      
(a) Number of organizations serviced directly (connected to PBX network or in Petit Saconnex buildings)

44

44

44

(b) Number of organizations serviced directly (accessing point to United Nations global network at UNOG)

10

10

10

(c) Number of extensions installed

5 200

3 075

2 215

(d) Number of voice mail installed

2 000

1 815

1 280

(c) Number of moves, adds and changes

8 500

4 380

4 615

2. Information on traffic      
(a) Number of calls on public network (local and long-distance, including international)

7 000 000

275 300

3 345 200

(b) Number of minutes on public network

16 500 000

9 701 500

9 698 700

(c) Number of calls on private network

3 000 000

2 480 600

2 525 800

(d) Number of minutes on private network

7 000 000

5 985 800

6 030 600

Subprogramme 2. Personnel service
(a) Bern Card actions

15 580

4 390

4 509

(b) P-5 actions processed

12 247

10 307

10 762

(c) Travel authorizations processed

834

710

319

(d) Letters of appointment issued

8 400

4 857

3 296

(e) Attestations for staff

1 990

963

1 405

(f) Home leave requests processed

738

439

328

(g) Within-grade increments processed

2 104

1 536

1 556

(h) Performance evaluation reports received

2 505

479

d/

Administration of justice      
(a) Joint Appeals Board cases

110

69

71

(b) Joint Disciplinary Committee cases

0

5

4

Language training      
Actual enrolment

3 698

1 862

2 026

Subprogramme 3. General services --1. Procurement contracts and supplies    
(a) Number of purchase orders

7 300

3 753

3 804

(b) Number of invoice payments processed

23 500

9 868

10 520

(c) Quantity of supplies (entries/issues)

12 000

8 796

9 072

(d) Number of Committee on Contracts presentations

150

85

67

(e) Number of requests for in-house printing

700

311

389

2. Transport and petrol card      
(a) Petrol cards

8 000

4 202

3 446

(b) CD car plates

450

199

261

(c) Import/export

7 000

5 890

7 693

(d) Other formalities

5 000

5 738

6 323

3. Travel documents      
(a) Travel authorizations

33 000

17 841

18 405

(b) Travel claims

18 500

9 342

10 506

(c) Laissez-passer issued

5 500

3 444

3 698

(d) Visas

8 000

3 858

3 736

(e) Family certificates

1 600

642

591

(f) United Nations certificates

1 800

581

856

d/ Figures not available at time of reporting.

 

 

Section 27F. Administration, Geneva - qualitative assessment of programme performance

Objectives 1. To provide policy advice and leadership to management and staff on major human, financial and information technology (IT) resources management issues;

2. To provide the full range of administrative and human resources management services, including language and staff development training, to all entities serviced, including staff counselling services, liaison with Swiss authorities and administration of justice;

3. To provide financial and budgetary services to substantive programmes and conference activities, including medical and life insurance services;

4. To provide support services to substantive programmes and conference activities, comprising security and safety, purchase and transportation, buildings management, mail and pouch and records management;

5. To provide the full range of information technology (IT) and telecommunications support services, including the development and maintenance of mission critical applications and campus-wide telecommunications facilities to substantive programmes and conference activities; and

6. To provide solutions to all potential problems linked to Year 2000 compliance.

Assessment criteria

Pending the development of performance indicators and efficiency assessment, client satisfaction with the timeliness, quality, responsiveness and costing of services provided was assessed via questionnaire. Other less formal means of assessment of service quality included written and verbal communications from clients. There has been a steady increase in demand for IT and other services, which may be used as an indicator of the quality of services provided.

Major benefits realized

Efficient and effective support services contributed to the programme implementation of various client entities. Responses from clients on all points rated the various aspects of services provided, as ranging from satisfactory to excellent with few exceptions. In particular a major impact has also been recognized in critical humanitarian relief activities supported by UNOG regarding emergency activities for disaster assistance and coordination. IT services provided by UNOG on a common services basis has led to an overall reduction of IT expenditure, though increased standardization and sharing of hardware, software and IT expertise. Decisions taken in the forum of the UNOG Technological Innovations Committee (TIC) have also been instrumental in achieving cost reductions. Substantial savings on telecommunications costs have been achieved by economies of scale realized through the central/common services approach. An integrated approach in the delivery of services in the human resources management area has led to increased motivation by broadening the scope of responsibilities and raising levels of quality.

External review and evaluation Services provided by UNOG were evaluated by the Joint Inspection Unit, the United Nations Board of Auditors and OIOS. A number of recommendations were acted upon, which addressed, inter alia, increased cost recovery and efficiency measures in the area of telecommunications, increased consistency in human resources management, increased inter-agency cooperation in the area of essential support services, critical review of methodologies for costing of services provided to extra-budgetary clients and reinforcement of security measures for financial processes.
Internal evaluation

and lessons learned

Internal evaluations were conducted in the various sections and services based on policy directives from UNHQ, "triggering events" and the results of the client satisfaction survey. In direct response to operational, organizational and strategic changes envisaged as a result of the Secretary-General’s programme of reform on human resources management, a programme of rationalization and regrouping of HRM functions continued, and in 1999, an integrated approach to operational functions was introduced as a mean to increase efficiency of service and facilitate service quality assessment. Improvements have also been made in the reduction of the backlog of cases in administration of justice, and in the delivery of training and examinations services.

A number of assaults on UNOG premises by militants and violent demonstrators resulted in reviews that led to strengthening of UNOG security and surveillance installations and the revision of UNOG security concept.

The preparations for the Y2K transition provided an opportunity to test the state of preparedness of UNOG, its ability to address, in a concerted team effort, a potential crisis and its capacity to develop office-wide contingency plans.

A number of improvements were also made regarding the information technology and software in use. Recognizing the intensive use of, and dependence on, information technology in financial processing and reporting, as well as in increasing the cost-effectiveness of service delivery, the strengthening of information technology and resources and capability is considered a key strategic element to the development objectives of the UNOG. There has been increased demand for the entire range of services provided by the Division, including IT services, which has substantially impacted its workload. This has signaled the need for formal service level agreements, charge-back methodologies and emphasis on client orientation and continuous training of staff.

Impact of reform and restructuring The restructuring measures relating to mandated savings and associated staff reductions did not negatively affect programme delivery in most areas. In the area of finance, particularly, programme delivery was assured by increased productivity realized through improved work methods and computerization. In the area of information technology, the restructuring resulted in a reduction in posts, which was accompanied by increased reliance, on a part-time basis, on outside contractors, particularly in Y2K preparations. This refocusing of resources allowed us to place ourselves on the cutting edge of the latest information technology.

Section 27G:

Administration, Vienna

Output/service by subprogramme

Programmed

Number provided

 

1998-1999

1998

1999

Subprogramme 1. Finance and budget      
(a) Preparation of the biennial programme and budget for the offices and programmes of the United Office at Vienna as well as for the United Nations International Drug Control Programme (regular budget only)

*

11

0

(b) Budgetary control of both regular budget appropriations and extrabudgetary resources for the said offices, including certification and staffing table control functions.

(i) Regular Budget organizational units monitored

(ii) Post management actions processed

*1

 

 

12

2 200

 

12

3 125

(c) Preparation of draft statements of programme budget implications for approval by Headquarters, and related services to functional commissions and committees.

- PBI's prepared

*1

 

 

4

 

1

(d) Submission of cost plans for extrabudgetary resources, excluding the United Nations International Drug Control Programme, and change-of-venue and related agreements.

- Extrabudgetary submission prepared (TF and other)

*1

 

 

8

 

8

(e) Accounting, payroll, payments and disbursements of funds and treasury functions for the organizational units of the United Office at Vienna and the United Nations International Drug Control Programme.

(i) Payment vouchers processed

(ii) Travel payments prepared

(iii) Treasury actions (EFT, Deposits, Cheques)

(iv) Payroll (number of staff)

*1

 

 

6 989

2 300

15 476

990

 

9 051

3 000

15 791

760

(f) Formulation of administrative responses to various organs such as the Board of External Auditors, the Office of Internal Oversight and the Joint Inspection Unit

(i) Number of external/BOA responses

(ii) Number of OIOS responses

*1

 

 

4

4

 

3

7

(g) Cost reimbursement agreements for programme support rendered to the Secretariat units funded from extrabudgetary resources, common system entities and intergovernmental organizations that utilize the facilities of the Vienna International Centre.

- Reimbursement agreements prepared and negotiated

*1

 

 

 

12

 

 

13

Subprogramme 2. Human resources management
(a) Policy direction, guidance and supervision.

- Consultation sessions and policy guidance provided as required

*1

 

0

0

(b) Personnel recruitment and administration. (i) Professional & General Service recruitments

(ii) Professional promotion placements

(iii) Meetings of the appointment and promotion bodies

(iv) Office (Personnel) files maintained

(v) Professional and General Service classification notices

(vi) Contracts issued

(vii) Number of retirees provided with administrative support

(viii) PAs raised and processed

(ix) Support to staff and families assigned to peacekeeping missions

(x) Interns recruited/supported

(xi) Associate experts administered

(xii) Volunteers recruited/supported

*1

111

107

54

3 550

124

900

260

3 007

20

45

11

10

206

112

68

3 594

260

1 032

260

3 739

35

77

17

14

(c) In-service staff training programmes.

(i) Office automation courses (hrs.taught)

(ii) Substantive skills training activities

(iii) Language training (number of participants

- Arabic

-Chinese

-English

-French

-Russian

-Spanish

*1

75

28

63

24

189

178

50

127

85

35

67

32

160

144

61

118

(d) Recruitment and placement of interpretation and other conference-servicing staff

- Short term conference service recruitment

*1

1 027

1 250

(e) Career development management.- NCRE and G-P exams administered. Also see (c) In-service staff training programmes and (h) Staff welfare and staff development

*1

6

4

(f) Staff management relations.--Consultations with staff representatives

*1

75

144

(g) Administration of justice, including substantive and secretariat support to the Vienna-based Joint Appeals Board and Joint Disciplinary Committee.--(i) Joint Appeals Board cases

(ii) Joint Disciplinary Committee cases

*1

 

14

1

6

0

(h) Staff welfare and staff development activities

(i) Number of UNOV/ODCCP staff that contacted staff counsellor

(ii) Number of seminars for staff retiring (jointly with UNIDO & IAEA)

*1

 

306

0

568

1

Subprogramme 3. Support services      
(a) Administration and operation of the United Nations communications system for United Nations offices at the Vienna International Centre.--(i) Number of registry items processed

(ii) Number of telexes transmitted

(iii) Number of faxes transmitted (pages)

(iv) Number of telephone extensions monitored

(v) Number of outgoing letter mail/printed material

(vi) Number of special courier consignments handled

(vii)Weight of bulk mail processed (kilos)

(viii) Weight of outgoing diplomatic pouches (kilos)

(ix) Number of staff served by messengers

*1

12 100

200

7 300

2 371

128 100

5 100

11 400

42 300

1 700

12 800

200

5 800

2 507

139 200

4 900

10 700

46 400

1 700

(b) Oversight of the commercial operations for United Nations organizational units and programmes at Vienna in the areas of procurement, inventory control and property management

(i) Number of purchases

(ii) Value of purchases

(iii) Number of contracts

(iv) Value of contracts

(v) Value of inventory managed

(vi) Value of office supply requests monitored

*1

 

273

1 600 000

89

2 700 000

11 900 000

215 000

 

410

3 400 000

77

3 300 000

14 400 000

205 000

       
* Not programmed in programme budget 1998-1999.      
(c) Arrangement of travel and transportation and issuance of laissez-passer and other travel documents to other international organizations at the Centre.--(i) Number of insurance claims

(ii) Number of shipments processed

(iii) Number of visa applications processed

(iv) Number of customs declarations processed

(v) Number of travel actions processed

(vi) Value of tickets purchased

(vii) Number of UN Laissez-passers processed

(viii) Number of UN certificates processed

*1

157

166

500

673

3 035

3 100 000

1 865

570

207

179

532

667

2 889

3 000 000

2 380

384

(d) Space allocation within the total area for the United Nations and coordination of related buildings services requirements.--(i) Space managed (square metre attributed to UNOV)

(ii) Buildings management actions (services provided, including wall and office movements)

*1

48 600

657

50 500

574

(e) Management of resource utilization for construction, alteration, improvements, major maintenance and garage operations.--(i) Value of alterations and improvements managed

(ii) Number of alterations and improvement projects implemented

(iii) Value of major maintenance

(iv) Quantity of vehicles using garage

*1

784 300

0

325 000

2 640

382 900

18

325 000

2 612

Subprogramme 4. Electronic support service
(a) Maintenance of and improvements to the existing mainframe and LAN-based computer applications that handle payroll, documents control, personnel master files, staffing tables, laissez-passer control and statistical data

(i) Number of monthly responses by help desk

(ii) Number of external gateways supported

(iii) Number of servers managed and run

(iv) Number of LAN applications supported

*1

 

1 000

12

34

40

 

1 232

6

34

47

(b) Preparation of an independent mainframe handling capacity

- Number of on-line disk capacity maintained (gigabytes)

*1

200

200

(c) Coordination of activities related to office automation

(i) Number of work stations supported by help desk

(ii) Number of printers supported by help desk

(iii) Number of users supported by help desk

*1

930

310

825

970

310

850

Subprogramme 5: Security and safety services      
(a) Screening of persons, vehicles and packages entering the premises of the Vienna International Centre

(i) Number of meetings covered

(ii) Number of delivery vehicles screened for access

(iii) Number of visitors/conference participants processed

(iv) Number of weapons detected

(v) Number of mail items screened through X-ray machine

*1

781

16 215

210 408

158

47 705

748

19 912

192 899

170

30 338

(b) Issuance of grounds passes and identifications cards

- Number of grounds passes issued/extended

*1

16 919

25 255

(c) Investigation of all incidents occurring on the premises which have security or safety implications

(i) Number of medical emergencies responded to

(ii) Responses to real and false fire alarms

*1

110

35

84

29

(d) Management of the security of approximately 11,000 door locks and 30,000 keys for all areas

(i) Number of keys issued/returned

(ii) Number of desks/area opened as special requests

*1

1 427

129

1 338

158

* Not programmed in programme budget 1998-1999.

Section 27G. Administration, Vienna - qualitative assessment of programme performance

Objectives 1. To provide the full range of human resources management services, including language and staff development training and the arrangements for medical services under the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) on Common Services, to all entities serviced, including staff counselling services, liaison with Austrian authorities and administration of justice;

2. To provide financial and budgetary services to substantive programmes and conference activities, including cost-sharing of common and joint services provided to VIC entities and implementation of Release 3 of IMIS;

3. To provide support services to substantive programmes and conference activities, comprising security and safety, purchase and transportation, buildings management, telecommunications support services, mail and pouch and records management; space allocation and the arrangements for buildings management services under the MoU on Common Services;

4. To provide the full range of information technology (IT) to substantive programmes and conference activities, including support for Releases 1 through 3 of IMIS and solutions to problems linked to Year 2000 compliance.

Assessment criteria

Performance indicators have been developed for various activities within the programme, and client satisfaction has been assessed via questionnaire. A less formal means of the assessment of service quality is maintained in files of correspondence with clients.

Major benefits realized

Administrative support has permitted effective programme implementation and conference service support for the range of entities served by the programme.

Net-budgeting was successfully implemented for the largest volume of jointly financed activities with other UN entities; programme support income was increased to $570,000; Release 3 of IMIS was successfully implemented and all balances between the mainframe system and IMIS ledgers were fully reconciled.

Accommodating increased personnel management services, including classification, to extrabudgetary staff within existing resources. Increasing the spectrum of training opportunities available to staff; launching workshops on gender sensitivity and mainstreaming; providing CD-ROM courses for self-learning in management, supervision, project management, team building, communications and performance appraisals.

Introduction of new communication technologies to speed up, simplify or reduce the cost of operations; ensuring full Y2K compliance; network performance and reliability was increased by completing the network backbone upgrade; the use of the Optical Disk System was enhanced and service delivery within Vienna stabilized; the use of the Intranet was expanded and more information put on-line. A new inventory system was introduced to ensure better inventory management and valuation. Better procurement planning procedures were introduced with substantive offices addressed individually in establishing a procurement plan for their budgets.

Security system was expanded and strengthened both inside and outside the building, a new, more cost-effective ID card system was implemented and training of security personnel was upgraded.

External review and evaluation Services provided by UNOV have been reviewed by the United Nations Board of Auditors and OIOS. The results of these audits indicate complete satisfaction with the performance of the Division. Recommendations suggesting increased monitoring as well as minor procedural improvements have been implemented.
Internal evaluation

and lessons learned

Internal evaluations, based on the performance indicators and related workload statistics have been undertaken on an informal basis, in direct response to operational, organizational and strategic changes envisaged as a result of the Secretary-General’s programme of reform.

In the light of the incursion of armed demonstrators in the VIC and the threat of repetition, UNOV security and surveillance installations were reviewed and revised.

Improvements were also made regarding information technology and software applications. In particular the implementation of IMIS Release 3 led to decentralization of the certification function. Language training, formerly administered by UNIDO under the MoU, has been provided by Human Resources Management Section and successfully managed, together with career development training.

Impact of reform and restructuring The mandated savings and associated staff reductions have not negatively affected programme delivery within the Division. Improved work methods and exploitation of computer applications have helped across the board to support the increased workload of UNOV’s substantive units and conference activities.

Section 27H:

Administration, Nairobi

Output/service by subprogramme

Programmed

Number provided

 

1998-1999

1998

1999

Subprogramme 1. Financial resources management  
(a) Financial statements prepared

*

277

386

(b) Cheques issued

*

11 818

12 478

(c) Wire transfer payments

*

2 890

3 777

(d) Journal vouchers processed

*

3 775

5 471

(e) Obligation documents processed

*

11 477

13 091

(f) Payments processed

*

1 606

2 298

(g) Travel claims

*

2 241

2 435

(h) Staff processed on payroll (all categories)

*

1 098

1 156

(i) Trust funds managed

*

80

91

(j) Project sub-allotments issued

*

81

78

(k) New projects approved

*

89

67

(l) Progress reports, terminal reports and audit certificates

*

233

167

(m) Donor agreements reviewed and issued

*

33

19

(n) Financial reports to counterpart contribution donors

*

33

34

(o) Budgetary and financial information reports issued

*

200

274

Subprogramme 2. Human resources management  
(a) Vacancy announcements issued

*

105

120

(b) Personnel actions processed

*

1 791

8 626

(c) Appointment letters issued

*

1 437

1 455

(d) Training programmes and tests conducted

*

273

262

(e) Patients treated

*

8 019

7 941

(f) Hours spent counselling staff members in person

*

12 878

13 201

(g) Travel claims approved

*

680

900

(h) Classification reviews processed

*

134

148

Subprogramme 3. Support services
(a) Area of conference and other space maintained (sq.m)

*

45 460

45 460

(b) Purchase orders issued

*

1 209

1 382

(c) Contracts issued

*

239

292

(d) Invoices processed

*

7 198

7 607

(e) Local contracts committee presentations

*

109

132

(f) Travel authorizations

*

4 384

4 540

(g) Laissez-passer and family certificates renewed

*

472

464

(h) Visas issued

*

577

631

Subprogramme 4. Information technology services
(a) IMIS releases supported

*

1

2

(b) Applications maintained

*

10

13

(c) File and printer sharing clients

*

1 425

1 750

(d) Help desk calls supported

*

8 513

12 753

(e) Personnel computers maintained

*

855

1 056

(f) Telephone extensions services

*

2 250

2 350


(g) Telephone calls on the public network

*

2 900 000

2 650 000

(h) Video conferences conducted

*

10

40

Subprogramme 5. Security and safety services
(a) Grounds passes issued

*

3 200

3 800

(b) Vehicles searched entering and leaving

*

9 800

11 100

(c) Traffic accidents investigated

*

200

275

(d) Calls for assistance provided

*

720

875

(e) Foot patrols conducted

*

1 050

1 140

(f) Security incident reports submitted

*

250

290

(g) Security site surveys conducted

*

90

110

(h) Burglary investigations conducted

*

40

43

Subprogramme 6. Conference services
(a) Intergovernmental meetings with interpretation

*

144

300

(b) Meetings without interpretation

*

150

200

(c) Non-calendar meetings

*

10

10

(d) Multilingual meetings with remote translation held outside Nairobi

*

180

200

(e) Pages edited and translated

*

25 000

29 000

(f) Pages of outsourced translation

*

5 000

7 000

(g) Output of print shop in millions of pages

*

45

55

* Not programmed in programme budget 1998-1999.

Section 27H.B(1-4) Administration, Nairobi - qualitative assessment of programme performance

Objectives 1. To provide timely and efficient human resources management services, including language and staff development training, medical assistance and implementation of IMIS HR releases in UNEP, UNCHS and UNON.

2. To provide financial services to UNON, UNEP and UNCHS, make the financial applications Y2K compliant and have necessary validations and edits in the new system.

3. To manage all UNON’s and UNEP’s regular budget and extrabudgetary resources and staffing tables.

4. To provide procurement of goods and services, travel and shipping, registry and buildings and grounds maintenance.

Assessment criteria 1. Timely processing of contracts, entitlements, classifying actions and filling vacancies. Percentage of correct Personnel Actions in IMIS. Implementation of audit observations. Number of courses offered to staff members; level of upgrading professional competency. Number of patients assisted.

2. Implementation of audit recommendations, clean-up of backlogs and improvements to financial systems as required by the users.

3. Resources are managed efficiently and effectively in accordance with set guidelines.

4. Timely delivery of goods and services and processing of travel documents.

Major benefits realized Improved services both in quality and quantity to the three organizational entities. Minimal audit observations in the area of contracts and procurement. Prompt/timely delivery of goods and services as per specifications. Successful conversion of financial systems to Y2K compliant.

Common services approach has led to economies of scale in the area of information technology services. Payment to staff members of lump-sum for security allowance through payroll instead of reimbursement on a claim basis has resulted in substantial savings to the organization.

External review and evaluation Service provided by the Human Resources Management Service (HRMS) and Financial Resources Management Service were audited and inspected by the United Nations Board of Auditors and OIOS. Most of the observations and recommendations made by them were accepted and significant progress was made in implementing them.
Internal evaluation

and lessons learned

In preparation for the implementation of IMIS in payroll, all types of staff entitlements were reviewed by comparing data in the current payroll with that of IMIS. Improvements were made in recruitment lead time and the delivery of training programmes.

Impact of reform and restructuring

In order to rationalize the structure of HRMS, it has been decided that the Classification Unit and Recruitment Section will be merged into one effective January 2000. A pilot project in time and attendance was successfully introduced in UNON.

 

Section 27H.B(5) Conference services, Nairobi - qualitative assessment of programme performance

Objectives 1. To provide cost-efficient and timely planning, coordinating and servicing of meetings, as authorized by the General Assembly, governing bodies of UNCHS (Habitat) and UNEP, and by the international convention secretariats in Nairobi and in other locations. In doing this, the service was expected to: maintain CS in Nairobi as essential element of UNON; increase utilization of UNON conference facilities; maintain and increase the client base; use remote translation technique for servicing all meetings held outside Nairobi.

2. To translate all official documents of UNCHS, UNEP and convention secretariats, including through contractual translation where appropriate and cost-effective, by using Internet networked contractual translators.

3.To provide institutional and extrabudgetary clients with high quality reproduction and printing services at competitive terms.

Assessment criteria

1.Increase in the demand for conference and meetings to be serviced by CS. Number of intergovernmental meetings with interpretation in Nairobi was to reach 190; number of meetings in Nairobi without interpretation 350; non-calendar meetings 20; multilingual meetings with remote translation outside Nairobi 380. Statistical analysis of the utilization factor to be provided to the Committee on conferences annually.

2. Increased productivity of translators. Without increase in staffing the number of pages edited and translated should reach 54,000, while outsourced translation reaches 12,000 pages. Chiefs of Language Units are empowered to make decisions on outsourcing translation to be able to meet deadlines and use scarce human resources for ongoing translation and servicing meetings.

3. Output of the printshop should reach 100 million page-units. Black-and-white reproduction migrates into digital printing. Colour printing becomes a major area of the printshop activity. Diversified range of products makes the printshop more attractive as a service centre.

Major benefits realized

1. CS has been maintained in Nairobi as an essential element of UNON. Level of meetings activity in Nairobi increased by 108 per cent in 1999, against 1998. Number of intergovernmental meetings with interpretation reached 444; meetings without interpretation 350; non-calendar meetings 20; multilingual meetings with remote translation outside Nairobi 380. The client base increased. The General Assembly decided to establish a permanent interpretation service at UNON, Nairobi is becoming a more attractive conference centre.

2. Through effective empowerment of Chiefs of Units in outsourcing translation, CS was able to service all meetings held in and outside Nairobi by remote translation without assigning language staff to venues; thus increasing utilization of human resources at Nairobi; with resulting increase of overall translation figures to the planned objective. The productivity of translators is 25 per cent higher than the workload standards.

3. In 1999, the printshop moved into digital printing, by installing two Docutech-Xerox units. They now cover 80 per cent of document reproduction needs, while operated by one operator each. The released capacity of offset equipment is used to produce colour products, which have higher market value. The released staff is used to reinforce other areas of printshop. Digital printing phases out the messenger service.

Legislative review Data on UNON Conference Services performance is submitted annually to the substantive session of the Committee on Conferences; actual and estimated workload indicators are submitted to the General Assembly every biennium in the course of budget preparation.
External review and evaluation OIOS recommended a review of the delegation of authority to service meetings with a view to the transfer to UNON of a larger share of responsibility over UN conferences and meetings. CS initiated the recommended survey of the potential demand for conference servicing, with special stress on interpretation, among the existing and prospective clients, and the results were shared with DGAACS in August 1999. By its resolution 54/248 B, the General Assembly decided to create a permanent interpretation team in Nairobi.
Internal evaluation and lessons learned Internal analysis of performance for the biennium shows that the operation of charge-back system has its benefits and deficiencies. The service is more client-oriented, resulting in higher client satisfaction and increased flexibility in meeting their demand. It increases production and stimulates creativity of the staff. Negative effects are: lower job security, that affects staff morale; excessive administrative and cost-accounting reporting to be done; less time left for long-term planning. Creation of the team of interpretation is a move in the right direction.
Impact of reform and restructuring

The restructuring and reorganization resulted in increased cost-effectiveness, higher efficiency and client satisfaction.

 

Section 28 Internal oversight

Output/service by subprogramme

Programmed

Number provided

 

1998-1999

1998

1999

Office of the Under-Secretary-General
Parliamentary documentation:
Annual analytical and summary report to the General Assembly on activities of OIOS

2

1

1

Substantive servicing:
Fifth Committee (1998/1999)

2

1

1

Subprogramme 1: Central evaluation
Parliamentary documentation:
Biennial report on strengthening the role of evaluation (1998)

1

1

-

In-depth evaluation reports

4

2

2

Triennial reviews of in-depth evaluations

4

2

2

Substantive servicing:      
Fifth Committee (1998)

1

1

-

Committee for Programme and Coordination (1998/1999)

2

1

1

Subprogramme 2: Audit and management consulting
Internal oversight services (RB/XB):
Audits of payroll and personnel management (incl. Consultancies), financial systems, procurement, property management and programme and project management

*

24

28

Peacekeeping audits

40-50

20

18

Audits of technical cooperation projects and information centres

*

4

14

Management audits

15(approx.)

8

3

Audits of electronic data processing

15(approx.)

6

5

Audits of UNHCR field operations and regular audits of support services at Headquarters

40-50

25

30

Audits of activities funded by UN International Drug Control Programme, ITC and UNJSPF (costs will be reimbursed)

*

12

11

Consulting services

*

2

2

Follow-Up on audit recommendations of earlier bienniums

*

   
Subprogramme 3: Central monitoring and inspection
Parliamentary documentation:
Report of the Secretary-General on the programme performance of the Organization for the biennium 1996-1997 (1998)

1

1

 
Report of the Secretary-General on Ways in which the full implementation and the quality of mandated programmes and activities could be ensured and could be better assessed by and reported to Member States (1999)  

0

1

Substantive servicing:
Fifth Committee (1998 and1999)

1

1

1

Committee for Programme and Coordination (1998 and 1999)

1

1

1

Internal oversight services:
Periodic monitoring of 26 budget sections

2

1

1

Inspections; follow-up on recommendations

8

3a/

4b/

Follow-up inspection reviews for UNEP and Habitat

*

 

2

Ensuring systems for self-monitoring and self-evaluation are established at the departmental level, and assess the adequacy and effectiveness of the systems as a management tool.

*

26 budget

sections

4

Assist programme managers in strengthening oversight functions through training and provision of guidelines.    

5

Subprogramme 4: Investigations
Internal oversight services (RB/XB)
Clearance of case backlog and new additional investigation

(a) Backlog

(b) New cases

450

151

212

251

255

Improvement of confidential reporting facility

ST/AI/397

31

17

Assess and analyse fraud potential in high-risk operations and recommendation of corrective action

*

0

1

Enhancement of existing liaison channels as well as establishment of new channels

*

c/

d/

Strengthen the capacity of the Nairobi office

*

0

 
Follow-up on earlier recommendations

(a) New recommendations

(b) Outstanding recommendations:

*

63

 

147

* Estimates not indicated in programme budget for 1998-1999.

c/ As a result of the criminal cases presented to national law enforcement jurisdictions by the Organization during 1998 and 1999, new contacts with national law enforcement authorities were made as well as enhanced. These liaisons are continuing rather than separate incidents.

d/ During 1999, two staff members were added to the existing Investigation Section in Nairobi, bringing the total professional staff to three. In addition, the capacity of the Investigation Section office in Nairobi was strengthened with technical equipment to assist the Section staff in the conduct of their work.

 

 

Section 28. Internal Oversight Services - qualitative assessment of programme performance

Sub-programmes

Objectives

Assessment criteria

Major benefits realized

1. Central evaluation To provide the Committee for Programme and Coordination (CPC) and the General Assembly with in-depth evaluation studies and reports to facilitate its triennial reviews of the implementation of recommendations previously approved by the General Assembly; to assist departments and offices throughout the Secretariat in implementing approved evaluation recommendations;

Acceptance and implementation by departments and offices of recommendations; endorsement of recommendations by CPC;

CPC endorsed 54 and reformulated 2, out of 65 recommendations put forward in eight evaluation reports. Out of 88 recommendations previously endorsed by CPC during the preceding three years, 16 were fully implemented; significant progress in the implementation of 68 recommendations were reported and four had not been implemented. Implementation of recommendations led, for example, to DPI pursuing a more active way of using traditional and new electronic media, and developing a more effective news-gathering and delivery system; and DPKO making significant progress in applying lessons learned, in particular those relative to the information aspects of peacekeeping missions, and the liquidation of missions.
2. Audit and management consulting To assist programme managers in the effective discharge of their responsibilities by providing information, analyses, and recommendations aimed at: the effective implementation of programmes and legislative mandates;

the adequate safeguarding of assets and the efficient and economical use of resources; compliance with General Assembly resolutions and with financial, staff, and programme regulations and rules and related administrative instructions; and the maintenance of effective internal controls.

Number of audits conducted; number of recommendations issued and accepted. A total of 2,233 audit recommendations were issued, of which 2,142 (96%) were accepted by the auditees, and 461 (22 %) were implemented during the biennium.

1,388 recommendations (62 per cent) related to strengthening management and internal controls, and 760 (34 per cent) aimed at improving operational efficiency and effectiveness and the accuracy of management information. The recommendations called for overpayment recoveries, cost reductions, and additional income amounting to $35.1 million and identified losses or waste of resources amounting to an additional $11.5 million. Internal management consulting services were also provided to a number of Secretariat clients. One was a workload and workflow analysis covering an entire department and resulted in recommendations to allow for the common setting of goals and priorities; strategic and tactical planning and decision making; improved departmental resource allocation; and greater effectiveness in meeting organizational demands.

3. Central monitoring and inspection To assist programme managers in utilizing monitoring as an integral part of their management and oversight responsibility, and assessing how effectively the accomplishment of those outputs have contributed to the achievement of objectives set out in the medium-term plan; to provide Member States with reports that provide analytical assessments of the programme performance of the United Nations; to identify problems affecting the efficient implementation of programmed activities and recommend corrective measures as appropriate; Continuous, compatible and efficient mechanisms and modalities for monitoring performance. Comprehensive, analytical reporting. Acceptance/implementation of

inspectoral recommendations.

Managers were aware on a continuing basis of the status of implementation of programmed activities and services, enabling timely and effective programme delivery, an ongoing assessment of attainment of objectives. Compatibility between resources utilized and final implementation were reported to CPC/GA.

Management controls were strengthened, and measures aimed at enhancing programme delivery, instituted. Recommendations relative to staff issues elicited proactive response from managers.

4. Investi-gations To investigate and detect fraud, misconduct, mismanagement, waste of resources, abuse of authority, violations of rules and regulations of the United Nations, and other malfeasances which have been reported, and to provide support to the Secretary-General and programme managers on legal or disciplinary action to be taken following such findings; to recommend policies and measures for corrective actions, as appropriate; to assess the potential within programme areas for fraud and other violations through the analysis of systems of control in high-risk operations; Continuing demand for Investigation Section services; number of cases received; number of reports and recommendations issued for corrective action or improvement of current systems; implementation rate of recommendations issued by the Section; acceptance of Investigation Section reports by programme managers; During 1998-1999, the acceptance of the Investigation Section’s role as an oversight tool is evident in the 30% increase in reports made to the Section as well as the 157 new recommendations issued by the Section. This in turn provides a deterrent against future violations as well as the means to detect those which have already occurred. As at the end of 1998, 97% of recommendations issued were accepted by management with an overall implementation rate of 92% (because many recommendations take time to implement, e.g. disciplinary measures, rates for 1999 may be determined later in 2000). 100% of reports issued in 1998-1999 were accepted by managers.
Legislative review CPC expressed appreciation for six out of eight in-depth evaluations and triennial reviews, and noted that the "activities of the Central Evaluation Unit were beneficial to both the United Nations and Member States". CPC concluded that the analytical approach of the programme performance report for 1996-1997 in the context of the medium-term plan 92-97 had facilitated discernment of the meaning of the data presented. Inspection, audit, and investigation reports, and annual reports on the work of OIOS in 1998 and 1999 were considered by the General Assembly at its 53rd and 54th sessions. In its review of the implementation of the resolution which established OIOS, the GA reaffirmed resolution 418B, recognizing the importance of OIOS in continuing to assist the Secretary-General in fulfilling his internal oversight responsibilities (GA Res. 54/244).
Internal and external assessments Efforts have been made to intensify dialogue with clients, to engage them more fully during the course of work, to more visibly and extensively reflect their comments, and to improve the quality and usefulness of those reports to management, which in turn has an impact on implementation. Within OIOS, reports are subject to peer review. The JIU and the Board of Auditors receive copies of OIOS reports for their comments as appropriate. In 1999, the External Auditors’ audit of AMCD called for improved procedures relating to the computerized information tracking system, timely issuance of reports, and the training and professional development of audit staff. Comments by the CPC and the GA on the content of reports, and on further requirements are embodied in resolutions and decisions which OIOS abides by, and reflects in future reports. Furthermore, OIOS gradually shifted its attention to a horizontal approach in looking for example at common services and how they function in different duty stations, at human resources management and information technology management, including efforts to address the year 2000 computer problem.
Impact of the reform and restructuring

The Secretary-General's Programme for Reform served as the basis for a number of OIOS audits, and all six inspections in the biennium, to assess progress in enhancing the programmatic and administrative efficiency of specific organizational entities.

 


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